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  • Recent Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    Reviewed by Douglas McDermid Trent University Published November 19 2012 2012 11 22 Jessica Brown and Mikkel Gerken eds Knowledge Ascriptions Oxford University Press Reviewed by Stephen Hetherington The University of New South Wales Published November 19 2012 2012 11 21 Jay Lampert Simultaneity and Delay A Dialectical Theory of Staggered Time Continuum Reviewed by Felix Ó Murchada National University of Ireland Galway Published November 18 2012 2012 11 20 Robert Sinnerbrink New Philosophies of Film Thinking Images Continuum Reviewed by Jason M Wirth Seattle University Published November 18 2012 2012 11 Joseph Almog and Paolo Leonardi eds Having In Mind The Philosophy of Keith Donnellan Oxford University Press Reviewed by Julie Wulfemeyer Colgate University Published November 16 2012 2012 11 18 Peter C Hodgson Shapes of Freedom Hegel s Philosophy of World History in Theological Perspective Oxford University Press Reviewed by Mark Tunick Florida Atlantic University Published November 15 2012 2012 11 17 Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick The Soul of Nietzsche s Beyond Good and Evil Cambridge University Press Reviewed by Mattia Riccardi Universidade do Porto Published November 14 2012 2012 11 16 Daniel W Smith Essays on Deleuze Edinburgh University Press Reviewed by Keith Ansell Pearson University

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/recent-reviews/ (2012-11-25)
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  • About // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    months of a book s publication Reviews are commissioned and vetted by a distinguished international Editorial Board The journal is published only electronically available free through e mail subscription RSS feed and on this website Co Editors in Chief Gary Gutting Anastasia Friel Gutting Editorial Assistant Robby Gustin All material appearing in NDPR is reproduced with the permission of the contributing author Any material appearing in NDPR may be copied

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/about/ (2012-11-25)
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  • Archive // Review // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    2010 25 August 2010 34 July 2010 31 June 2010 41 May 2010 25 April 2010 15 March 2010 15 February 2010 22 January 2010 27 December 2009 13 November 2009 27 October 2009 22 September 2009 37 August 2009 33 July 2009 35 June 2009 34 May 2009 38 April 2009 30 March 2009 34 February 2009 35 January 2009 28 December 2008 15 November 2008 18 October 2008 23 September 2008 21 August 2008 25 July 2008 33 June 2008 42 May 2008 32 April 2008 31 March 2008 27 February 2008 24 January 2008 21 December 2007 15 November 2007 20 October 2007 22 September 2007 19 August 2007 23 July 2007 21 June 2007 22 May 2007 22 April 2007 27 March 2007 28 February 2007 24 January 2007 20 December 2006 16 November 2006 19 October 2006 22 September 2006 24 August 2006 23 July 2006 20 June 2006 22 May 2006 22 April 2006 20 March 2006 22 February 2006 20 January 2006 20 December 2005 17 November 2005 20 October 2005 20 September 2005 20 August 2005 18 July 2005 18 June 2005 18 May 2005 9 April 2005 9 March 2005 12

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/archives/ (2012-11-25)
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  • Editorial Board // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    Fischer UC Riverside Paul Griffiths Sydney Anil Gupta Pittsburgh Karen Hanson Indiana Sally Haslanger MIT Brad Hooker Reading Philip Ivanhoe City University Hong Kong Michael Kremer Chicago Peter Lamarque York Charles Larmore Brown Leonard Lawlor Penn State Brian Leiter Chicago Jerrold Levinson Maryland Todd May Clemson M M McCabe King s College London Howard McGary Rutgers Michael Morgan Indiana Lenny Moss Exeter Paul Moser Loyola Chicago John Perry Stanford UC

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/editorial-board/ (2012-11-25)
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  • Reviewers' Guidelines // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    with a brief paragraph or two giving any overall characterization of the book so that readers can tell quickly if they are interested in reading the entire review Reviewers of anthologies should give an overall sense of the contents They may if appropriate choose to focus on a subset of the essays for detailed discussion The review should offer an evaluation of at least some key aspects of the book and not merely provide a summary It is also important to give reasons for any evaluations particularly negative ones For easier readability online we strongly suggest avoiding paragraphs that are longer than half a single spaced page Reviews should typically fall within the range of 1500 2500 words Reviewers who think a book requires longer or shorter treatment should check with the editors A primary goal of NDPR is to provide timely reviews of new books Therefore a review is due no later than three months after the reviewer receives the book Please submit the review as an email attachment preferably a doc x file An rtf file is also acceptable We are not able to format and edit pdf wpd or LaTeX files Please begin the review with a

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/reviewers-guidelines/ (2012-11-25)
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  • Free Subscription // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    s Guidelines Free Subscription Free Subscription Search Search Author Title Reviewer Keyword You can subscribe to our reviews in several ways via Email To subscribe via email visit our listserv signup form via RSS Feed RSS feed for all reviews

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/free-subscription/ (2012-11-25)
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  • Philosophical Delusion and its Therapy: Outline of a Philosophical Revolution // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    let s cure ourselves of such delusions My admiration for this methodically neat treatment of the presentation is constant throughout the book Fischer never lets go of the orderly building of his argument even though he needs to traverse several different planes while doing so connecting philosophical concepts to their psychological linguistic pictures establishing the fascinating pedigree of these pictures in historical models relating these histories to current or at least 20 th century successors and providing the comprehensive harbingers of therapeutic philosophy in the thought and more importantly action of Austin and Wittgenstein Pictures rather than propositions metaphors rather than statements determine most of our philosophical convictions 21 Thus begins the first chapter of the first part of the book this is the unsubstantiated to my mind claim that drives the whole book Philosophers are under the spell of philosophical pictures such pictures actually metaphors and analogies now amenable to linguistic and psychological description and analysis thanks to the scientific work recently done in linguistics and psychology This analysis propels us forward to the errors we make unintentionally when our reasoning is based on such pictures The ultimate example of such a picture is the one bequeathed us by Locke modern philosophy s conception of the mind as a perceptual space which holds objects of perception and as a perceptual organ This metaphorical conception and the unconscious reasoning based on it is shown by Fischer to be responsible for all those famous issues of modern philosophy that we in turn might bequeath to future generations of philosophers the mind body problem substances and accidents primary and secondary qualities and all our questions about perception The complex point made in this first part of the book is elucidatory of all philosophical discussion and doctrine Faced with ordinary facts of our senses and our common sense we become troubled only because we have posited unintentionally perhaps other facts that are based on our picture driven inferences and this incongruence gives rise to the traditional terminology issues and problems of philosophy But the original fact to be explained the original picture was actually a bogus explanandum suggesting a wild explanation and providing the premises of what argument is subsequently adduced in its support 109 The distance from this culmination of the first part on philosophical pictures to philosophical delusions is not far Just as philosophical pictures were dissected to begin with by data and research coming out of linguistics and psychology and showing how we reason wrongly based on our working out of metaphors and structural analogies now another scientific psychological concept is put to work to explain how philosophers in this case Berkeley and Ayer maintain doctrines which are absurd as a matter of delusion Berkeley s process of argumentation is played out including several fallacies such as the fallacy of question begging Assuming the Conclusion and the psychological construct of belief bias Ayer s arguments for sense data are similarly explained using both linguistic and psychological explication But both of

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/35797-philosophical-delusion-and-its-therapy-outline-of-a-philosophical-revolution-2/ (2012-11-25)
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  • Stoic Pragmatism // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    about the world and about ourselves and this means that no philosophy can be reckoned adequate unless it acknowledges that animal faith commits us to a certain shared conceptual scheme and that our scheme s structure and content are susceptible of philosophical analysis But analysis without synthesis is sterile and reason is less important in philosophy than imagination and sensibility Philosophers must speak to our condition and the worth of a philosopher s work is negligible unless it can change the aspect under which we see our lives The greatest American philosophers Emerson Thoreau James Royce Santayana and Dewey never forgot that philosophy must be relevant to the lives of individuals and this is one reason why reading their works is still rewarding The book s fifth strand intertwined with its fourth consists of Lachs s critical reflections on the current state of academic philosophy in the United States Here his remarks are almost certain to vex and nettle many members of the professoriate Why Because Lachs does nothing to disguise his disappointment with what he thinks has happened to American philosophy in the last century Too many present day American philosophers he complains are afflicted with physics envy p 61 cf p 13 Impressed by science s magnificent achievements they assume that philosophy ought to follow its lead and they think of themselves primarily as professional researchers engaged in purely theoretical pursuits Encouraged to define themselves as specialists many professors write exclusively for a tiny sub set of the scholarly community and their highly technical work offers little sustenance to a non academic audience hungry for insight into the human condition Not coincidentally their hearts and minds are not transformed by their thoughts for them philosophy is essentially an agreeable way of earning a living not a way of life which makes special moral demands on souls who feel called to follow it The result of all this Lachs thinks is that philosophy is no longer taken very seriously by non philosophers and that more than a few philosophy professors lead lives of quiet desperation no longer sure what their subject is good for For where they ask themselves are the grand discoveries dreamt of by science besotted philosophers And what contribution they wonder has what now passes as philosophy really made to the betterment of man s estate 4 While I think there is some truth in what Lachs says about the current state of academic philosophy yes Virginia there are some philosophers who are positively green with science envy who live by philosophy but not for it the phrase is Schopenhauer s who are proud of the fact that their interests are narrow and their papers jargon laden who loathe teaching Philosophy 101 and who have nothing to say qua philosophers to non academics his treatment of its defects strikes me as exaggerated and one sided For one thing more than a few contemporary American philosophers and Lachs himself is one of them 5 have written highly

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/35748-stoic-pragmatism-2/ (2012-11-25)
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