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  • Recent Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    by Jason Read University of Southern Maine Published December 03 2015 2015 12 04 Stefano Marino Aesthetics Metaphysics Language Essays on Heidegger and Gadamer Cambridge Scholars Reviewed by John McCumber UCLA Published December 02 2015 2015 12 03 John Gibson ed The Philosophy of Poetry Oxford University Press Reviewed by Ole Martin Skilleås University of Bergen Published December 02 2015 2015 12 02 Steven Vogel Thinking like a Mall Environmental Philosophy after the End of Nature MIT Press Reviewed by Gary Varner Texas A M University Published December 01 2015 2015 12 01 John Walker ed The Impact of Idealism The Legacy of Post Kantian German Thought Volume II Historical Social and Political Thought Cambridge University Press Reviewed by Tatjana Sheplyakova Goethe University Frankfurt Published November 30 2015 2015 11 31 Michael Martin and Keith Augustine eds The Myth of an Afterlife The Case against Life after Death Rowman and Littlefield Reviewed by William Hasker Huntington University Published November 30 2015 2015 11 30 Timothy Secret The Politics and Pedagogy of Mourning On Responsibility in Eulogy Bloomsbury Reviewed by Dawne McCance University of Manitoba Published November 29 2015 2015 11 29 Erin M Cline Families of Virtue Confucian and Western

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/recent-reviews/ (2015-12-05)
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  • About // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    publication Reviews are commissioned and vetted by a distinguished international Editorial Board We do not accept unsolicited reviews or proposals to review The journal is published only electronically available free through e mail subscription RSS feed and on this website Co Editors in Chief Gary Gutting Anastasia Friel Gutting Editorial Assistant Jack Himelright All material appearing in NDPR is reproduced with the permission of the contributing author Any material appearing

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/about/ (2015-12-05)
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  • Archive // Review // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    2013 27 August 2013 35 July 2013 41 June 2013 34 May 2013 32 April 2013 33 March 2013 34 February 2013 30 January 2013 35 December 2012 23 November 2012 33 October 2012 31 September 2012 26 August 2012 46 July 2012 44 June 2012 43 May 2012 31 April 2012 30 March 2012 34 February 2012 46 January 2012 39 December 2011 27 November 2011 39 October 2011 29 September 2011 33 August 2011 38 July 2011 40 June 2011 28 May 2011 24 April 2011 17 March 2011 36 February 2011 40 January 2011 32 December 2010 15 November 2010 13 October 2010 27 September 2010 25 August 2010 34 July 2010 31 June 2010 41 May 2010 25 April 2010 15 March 2010 15 February 2010 22 January 2010 27 December 2009 13 November 2009 27 October 2009 22 September 2009 37 August 2009 33 July 2009 35 June 2009 34 May 2009 38 April 2009 30 March 2009 34 February 2009 35 January 2009 28 December 2008 15 November 2008 18 October 2008 23 September 2008 21 August 2008 25 July 2008 33 June 2008 42 May 2008 32 April 2008 31 March 2008 27 February 2008 24 January 2008 21 December 2007 15 November 2007 20 October 2007 22 September 2007 19 August 2007 23 July 2007 21 June 2007 22 May 2007 22 April 2007 27 March 2007 28 February 2007 24 January 2007 20 December 2006 16 November 2006 19 October 2006 22 September 2006 24 August 2006 23 July 2006 20 June 2006 22 May 2006 22 April 2006 20 March 2006 22 February 2006 20 January 2006 20 December 2005 17 November 2005 20 October 2005 20 September 2005 20 August 2005 18 July 2005 18 June 2005 18 May

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/archives/ (2015-12-05)
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  • Editorial Board // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    UC Riverside Paul Griffiths Sydney Anil Gupta Pittsburgh Karen Hanson Minnesota Sally Haslanger MIT Brad Hooker Reading Philip Ivanhoe City University Hong Kong Michael Kremer Chicago Peter Lamarque York Charles Larmore Brown Leonard Lawlor Penn State Brian Leiter Chicago Jerrold Levinson Maryland Todd May Clemson M M McCabe King s College London Howard McGary Rutgers Michael Morgan Indiana Toronto Paul Moser Loyola Chicago Lenny Moss Exeter Robert Pasnau Colorado John

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/editorial-board/ (2015-12-05)
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  • Reviewers' Guidelines // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    Reviewers of anthologies should give an overall sense of the contents They may if appropriate choose to focus on a subset of the essays for detailed discussion The review should offer an evaluation of at least some key aspects of the book and not merely provide a summary It is also important to give reasons for any evaluations particularly negative ones For easier readability online we strongly suggest avoiding paragraphs that are longer than half a single spaced page Please do not underline or use bold font Use italics other than for book and journal titles sparingly Reviews should typically fall within the range of 1500 2500 words Reviewers who think a book requires longer or shorter treatment should check with the editors A primary goal of NDPR is to provide timely reviews of new books Therefore a review is due no later than three months after the reviewer receives the book Please submit the review as an email attachment preferably a doc x file An rtf file is also acceptable We are not able to format and edit pdf wpd or LaTeX files Please begin the review with a bibliographical entry for the book that follows the following format

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/reviewers-guidelines/ (2015-12-05)
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  • Free Subscription // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    our reviews in several ways via Email To subscribe via email visit our listserv signup form via RSS Feed RSS feed for all reviews Don t know what a feed is Learn more We strongly suggest that you add the NDPR address below to your email contacts address book trusted sender list or white list Doing so will ensure that you receive all the reviews since it will prevent our

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/free-subscription/ (2015-12-05)
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  • Space, Geometry, and Kant's Transcendental Deduction of the Categories // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    local space the latter of which is to be accounted for by Vinci s special reading of the container view help to shed light on previously obscure aspects of Kant s arguments The reader may experience some frustration in these early chapters caused by not understanding why these complex distinctions are necessary Chapter 3 maintains with Richard Aquila that Kant s objects of intuition should be read as intentional objects in Franz Brentano s sense On this hypothesis spatio temporal objects become vehicles of intentionality These objects are mind dependent and yet the cognitive states corresponding to them intend objects separate from the mind It would be clearer to say that they intend mind independent things although it must be granted that Kant uses the term objects promiscuously to refer either to objects of appearance or things in themselves an ambiguity that can only be resolved by attention to the context Vinci develops a projectionist account of intuition representations in which the form must be spatial in order for the objects of these representations to be themselves spatial Projectionism entails that for Kant empirical intuitions along with their form must be distinguished from intuitions in general or in Vinci s words that properties of the structure of intuitions themselves are projected onto the intentional objects of intuitions 225 Here again Vinci s interpretation runs counter to the standard interpretation in which intuitions in general would be read as including both empirical intuitions and pure intuitions such as mathematical constructions without giving clear grounds for this departure until much later He develops an analogy with a geographical map in order to motivate his account In the analogy intuitions in general correspond to symbols on the map whereas the blank space in which the map is constructed represents pure intuitions of local spaces For this reviewer the map analogy does not quite succeed in its purpose of clarifying the distinction between local and global space Vinci ends Chapter 3 by recognizing that our global representation of a topologically unified space requires a synthesis thus adding an active though noncategorial element to receptivity Vinci uses Chapter 4 for an extended exploration of Kant s theory of geometry and the ways in which he uses the example of geometry in defense of transcendental idealism The account of geometry is developed in conjunction with Philip Kitcher s interpretation and over against those of James Van Cleve Michael Friedman and Wayne Waxman It is beyond the scope of a review to go into the details of the debate here Vinci s unfolding of it is exhaustive as regards the English language commentators and seeks to clarify especially the relation of pure to applied geometry The chapter could stand on its own as a significant contribution to Kant s philosophy of mathematics Suffice it to say that the purpose of the foray into geometry is to develop the main point of the book to demonstrate that the proof structure of the Transcendental Deduction is parallel to that

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/62989-space-geometry-and-kant-s-transcendental-deduction-of-the-categories/ (2015-12-05)
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  • Spinoza's Critique of Religion and Its Heirs: Marx, Benjamin, Adorno // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
    a heartless world What Marx adopts from Spinoza is the assertion that religion must be understood as much as an effect as a cause a product of its material conditions as the ideal expression that in turn perpetuates these conditions Dobbs Weinstein rejects a fundamental teleology underlying Marxist theory not just the teleology that posits history as the inevitable progression to communism but the teleological progression that posits the critique of religion as necessarily prior to the critique of politics and culminating in the critique of political economy For Dobbs Weinstein the critique of religion is not the antechamber of true materialist critique the critique of political economy but a necessarily recurring aspect of critique Religion is nothing other than the transformation of material conditions into ideas the point where the existing social relations become metaphysics Dobbs Weinstein s invocation of the seventh proposition of Part Two of the Ethics could be then interpreted as another point of articulation of the Marx Spinoza relation As such it would take its place alongside the already mentioned Appendix to Part One of the Ethics the basis for Althusser s critique of ideology as well as Negri s understanding of the multitude in the Political Treatise as a point of philosophical transformation where the propositions of one philosopher resolve the problems of the other and vice versa The entire history of Marxist Spinozist scholarship can be understood as a history of similar points of articulation and transformation They are points where the ideas of one philosopher transform and interrogate the ideas of the other Here the critical point concerns the identity and non identity of things and ideas material conditions and their ideological expressions It just so happens that it was Max Horkheimer at the occasion becoming Director of the Institute for Social Research who gave the clearest formulation of this problem After stating that the fundamental problem of social philosophy is that of the connection between the economic life of society the psychological development of its individuals and the changes within culture Horkheimer maps out the different philosophical responses to this problem according to three major philosophers Horkheimer argues that a poor Marxism what one could call vulgar Marxism reduces everything to the first term the economic life while Hegel reduces everything to the second the spiritual development of individuals Lastly Horkheimer adds that the economy and spirit are the respective expressions of one and the same essence this amounts to a bad Spinozism As much as Horkheimer s remark seems like an aside like another one of the Frankfurt School s dismissive remarks about Spinoza it touches on something central to not only the Frankfurt School but dialectics in general the necessity of thinking together identity and non identity in ideology critique Religion as ideology may be nothing other than its material conditions mapped differently but this difference makes a difference Thought has to be seen as a product of its material conditions but still existing as thought The materialist understanding

    Original URL path: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/62969-spinoza-s-critique-of-religion-and-its-heirs-marx-benjamin-adorno/ (2015-12-05)
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