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  • breac // University of Notre Dame
    the usual mixture of amusement and resentment that surrounds a critical rebuke the authorship of the review remains to this day uncertain The purpose of this article is to investigate the possible candidacy of Thomas Moore as the author of the provocative review It seeks to solve a puzzle of almost two hundred years and in the process clear a valuable scholarly path in Irish Studies in the field of Romanticism and in our understanding of Moore s role in a prominent literary controversy of the age Read More Posted In Digital Humanities Networking a Scholarly Edition Networking Ulysses as a Digital Text and Research Site Published October 07 2015 Author Hans Walter Gabler Ludwig Maximilians Universität München Comments Assuming a graded distinction between information sites knowledge sites and research sites 1 what is it that specifically marks out the digital research site The types of site are all repositories of content The content they comprise and harvest is substantial knowledge The research site in particular is structured by nodes for content enrichment Assembling recording and holding knowledge the research site serves simultaneously to modify revise and increase it In research practice this happens in a man to machine query response interaction Utilizing the dynamic potential of the digital medium the digital research site brings to the fore the dynamic process nature of knowledge The constant dialogic negotiation of its content and substance is what renders the digital site a research site Read More Posted In Digital Humanities Current Articles Preface Published October 07 2015 Author Sonia Howell University of Notre Dame and Matthew Wilkens University of Notre Dame Comments In The Digital Humanities Manifesto 2 0 2009 the authors define the Digital Humanities as an array of convergent practices that explore a universe in which a print is no longer the exclusive or the normative medium in which knowledge is produced and or disseminated instead print finds itself absorbed into new multimedia configurations and b digital tools techniques and media have altered the production and dissemination of knowledge in the arts human and social sciences 1 Read More Posted In Digital Humanities The Emergence of the Digital Humanities in Ireland Published October 07 2015 Author James O Sullivan Penn State University Órla Murphy University College Cork Shawn Day University College Cork Comments Digital Humanities is not some airy Lyceum It is a series of concrete instantiations involving money students funding agencies big schools little schools programs curricula old guards new guards gatekeepers and prestige It might be more than these things but it cannot not be these things 1 Read More Posted In Digital Humanities An Digitiú agus na Daonnachtaí in Éirinn Published October 07 2015 Author Pádraig Ó Macháin University College Cork Comments Is féidir sainmhíniú fíorshimplí a dhéanamh ar an digitiú is é sin eolas a chruthú i bhfoirm leictreonach nó a aistriú go dtí an fhoirm sin Chomh fada siar le 1993 léirigh an Dr Peter Robinson na prionsabail bhunaidh phraiticiúla a bhain le foinsí scoláiriúla

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/ (2016-02-05)
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  • About Us // breac // University of Notre Dame
    are nearer in practice than they seem This journal proceeds in such a manner to write in splotches and specks to balance the beauty of particularities in a medium that is open interdisciplinary and global A peer reviewed paperless academic journal Breac begins with Irish Studies and looks outward It pairs the work of accomplished and emerging scholars in short focused issues with the hope of cultivating international discussions in a digital forum Each year we will publish two issues supplemented with additional interviews and reviews The online journal will utilize its medium and include pictures and clips sound bites and shorts The goal is to create a new space for conversation that pairs the accessibility of a digital medium with the commitment to cultural linguistic disciplinary and historic diversity Perhaps then we can wade cautiously into the broken uncertain breacsholas Terms of Use Directors Editorial Boards John Dillon Director Nathaniel Myers Associate Director Aedín Clements and Sonia Howell Senior Archive Editors Julie McCormick Weng and Jessica Kim Senior Reviews Editors General Editorial Board Viviane Carvalho da Annunciação ABEI USP UFBA Katarzyna Bartoszynska Bilkent University Guinn Batten Washington University in St Louis Lisa Caulfield University College Dublin Ronan Doherty National University of Ireland Maynooth Kara Donnelly University of Notre Dame Maud Ellmann University of Chicago Anna Finn University of California Irvine Derek Hand St Patrick s College Drumcondra Lindsay Haney University of Notre Dame Sonia Howell National University of Ireland Maynooth Alvin Jackson University of Edinburgh Vicki Mahaffey University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign PJ Mathews University College Dublin Nicole Miller University of Notre Dame Robinson Murphy University of Notre Dame Brian O Conchubhair University of Notre Dame Diarmuid Ó Giolláin University of Notre Dame James M Smith Boston College Kelly Sullivan Boston College Spurgeon Thompson Fordham University Sonja Tiernan

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/about/ (2016-02-05)
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  • Reviews // breac // University of Notre Dame
    Press 2015 xii 210 pp Read More Posted In Review Savage Indignation Civilized Published January 14 2016 Author Helen Deutsch University of California Los Angeles Comments Claude Rawson Swift s Angers Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2014 xiv 305 pp Read More Posted In Review Tainted Love Published January 07 2016 Author Sylvie Mikowski Université de Reims Comments Deirdre Brennan Staying Thin for Daddy Dublin Arlen House 2014 191 pp Read

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/reviews/ (2016-02-05)
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  • Submissions // breac // University of Notre Dame
    the broadest sense We invite submissions from a range of disciplines and shall conceive of psychoanalysis in therapeutic cultural as well as literary theoretical and epistemological terms We are interested in examining how the different schools of psychoanalytic practice classical linguistic object relations and so on have figured in Irish history and society We welcome psychoanalytic readings of Irish culture as well as readings of the culture of psychoanalysis in Ireland As well as the editors this issue of Breac will include works by Anne Mulhall University College Dublin Ed Madden University of South Carolina Beryl Schlossman UC Irvine Andre Furlani Concordia U and Ariel Watson Saint Mary s U Typical articles for submission vary in length from 3 000 8 000 words but we are happy to consider pieces that are shorter or longer We particularly welcome submissions that are suitable to a digital format The deadline for submissions is August 31st 2015 All submissions will be peer reviewed Full submission instructions are available at http breac nd edu submissions Please send all submissions to submissions breac org Questions are welcome and should be sent to info breac org Guidelines for Submissions Breac seeks to publish groundbreaking and innovative work in the field of Irish Studies alongside work from relevant adjoining fields such as Digital Humanities and Critical Theory If accepted your work will be seen by an international audience who will be able to engage in a scholarly conversation regarding your work on the Breac website Your work will also be securely stored in the Breac Archive which is sustained by CurateND at the University of Notre Dame We welcome submissions in any format especially those which take advantage of the digital nature of the journal Peer Review Process Breac employs a rigorous two part blind peer review

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/submissions/ (2016-02-05)
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  • BreaCam // breac // University of Notre Dame
    lectures interviews and exhibitions from around the world The aim is to make it possible to watch events that were previously inaccessible to the global Irish Studies community due to constraints of place and time Every few weeks a new video is featured Previous videos are currently archived through Breac Vimeo If you are interested in streaming or recording an event with BreaCam please contact us at info breac org

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/breacam/ (2016-02-05)
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  • Subscribe // breac // University of Notre Dame
    Home Subscribe Subscribe It is entirely free to subscribe to Breac If you subscribe you will recieve email notices when new issues are published as well as new Call For Papers Fill out my online form Copyright 2016 Keough Naughton

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/subscribe/ (2016-02-05)
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  • Preface // Articles // breac // University of Notre Dame
    as possible and through the development of a user centred content management system NícGhabhann situates the Monastic Ireland Project both within the historiography of Irish medieval architecture and within work in the field of the Digital Humanities both at the national and international scales In detailing the methodologies being employed in developing the digital repository NícGhabhann calls attention to the challenges posed by the nature of the source materials for the study of Irish medieval architectural heritage for Digital Humanities researchers and developers and to the importance of designing for user experience Staying with digitization in Ogham in 3D Nora White provides a detailed account of the how of digitization Against claims that work in the Digital Humanities can be driven by technologies rather than by the merit thereof to the objects being studied White describes how new developments in 3D laser scanning are used to record Ogham inscriptions and to provide representations of these unique aspects of Irish cultural heritage that are superior to those that have been provided by the older technologies of print and photography Moreover White outlines the ways 3D data is employed to assist in the reading of problematic inscriptions to inform conservation policy through deviation analysis and to analyze carving techniques and tools uses Thus like the Monastic Ireland project the Ogham in 3D project is driven by the desire to preserve and increase accessibility to information on Ogham inscriptions stones and sites and to facilitate the generation of new knowledge thereof In Requirements and National Digital Infrastructures Digital Preservation in the Humanities Sharon Webb expands on White s call for a national digital infrastructure for the purpose of preservation by offering an account of the Digital Repository of Ireland DRI As Webb points out scholars require sustainable access to sources in order to cultivate and maintain trust credibility and authority in his or her scholarly endeavors Given the complexities of access and preservation in the digital age Webb posits that Digital Humanities projects as well as other types of digital research should utilize existing digital environments such as the DRI in order to fulfill requirements such as storage and access Webb argues that in so doing researchers can focus more usefully on developing digital tools that engage different users in new types of knowledge creation and development In The Murals of Northern Ireland Project Tony Crowley provides a personal account of the development of the Murals in Northern Ireland Archive From physically gathering the data on the streets of Northern Ireland to manually logging the metadata in a digital database Crowley outlines the challenges of creating the archive Among the benefits of digitizing the murals Crowley lists increased accessibility to previously hidden or obscure material and new ways of engaging with this material In keeping with both of these aims we have utilized Crowley s article as a means of exploring new affordances offered by digital publishing platforms Specifically we present Crowley s article using SCALAR a publishing platform developed by Tara McPherson

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/articles/61572-preface-2/ (2016-02-05)
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  • Digital Humanities // Articles // breac // University of Notre Dame
    Ogham stone Dingle Peninsula I Introduction Ogham stones are among Ireland s most remarkable national treasures These perpendicular cut stones bear inscriptions in the uniquely Irish Ogham alphabet using a system of notches and horizontal or diagonal lines scores to represent the sounds of an early form of the Irish language The stones are inscribed with the names of prominent people and sometimes tribal affiliation These inscriptions constitute the earliest recorded form of Irish and as our earliest written records dating back at least as far as the fifth century A D they are a significant resource for historians as well as linguists and archaeologists 1 Read More Posted In Digital Humanities Requirements and National Digital Infrastructures Digital Preservation in the Humanities Published October 07 2015 Author Sharon Webb Digital Repository of Ireland Comments We historians literary scholars linguists philosophers musicians and others as practitioners of humanities have embraced the use of digital technology in all aspects of our work We use online digital infrastructures to access the vast majority of our sources we use bibliographic management systems to automate the referencing and organization of source material we use spreadsheets and databases to structure analyze and visualize our data and we use powerful text editors to typeset our work which in many ways support rapid prototyping of scholarly texts We also disseminate our research online through tweets blogs and personal and academic websites In a sense these new tools have seeped into the culture of humanities research and have become part of what we do they are immersed in the culture of the humanities and extend the humanities toolkit 1 Read More Posted In Digital Humanities Digitizing the Murals of Northern Ireland 1979 2013 Images and Interpretation Published October 07 2015 Author Tony Crowley University of Leeds Comments If your browser does not load the project iframe click here Read More Posted In Digital Humanities Visualizing a Spatial Archive GIS Digital Humanities and Relational Space Published October 07 2015 Author Ronan Foley Maynooth University and Rachel Murphy University College Cork Comments Introduction A Spatial Approach to the Digital Humanities Geography matters In any reading of literature or history paper or digital our imaginations are often invoked through a spatial sense In a country where the importance of dinnseanchas or place lore remains a significant contemporary component a reading of place regularly features across the multiple strands of Irish Studies 1 Read More Posted In Digital Humanities Computing Ireland s Place in the Nineteenth Century Novel A Macroanalysis Published October 07 2015 Author Matthew L Jockers University of Nebraska Lincoln Comments Introduction 1 Right now in 2015 we are in the early stages of articulating or defining a new type of literary criticism It whatever it may be goes by various names For describing this kind of work many have latched on to the recently minted newly popular and annoyingly imprecise term Digital Humanities To my mind this thing that we have come to call Digital Humanities is neither a method

    Original URL path: http://breac.nd.edu/articles/category/digital-humanities/ (2016-02-05)
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