archive-edu.com » EDU » O » OSC.EDU

Total: 329

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • BOR directive creates OH-TECH to help streamline consortia
    according to an Ohio Board of Regents BOR directive While the Ohio Supercomputer Center Ohio Academic Resources Network OARnet and eStudent Services previously known as Ohio Learning Network will maintain its distinct identity and mission several governance structures are being modified to streamline management and some support functions are being merged to further increase the efficiency of these highly regarded organizations The official BOR announcement follows Chancellor Petro Announces Creation of Ohio Technology Consortium OH TECH Ohio s technology operations merge to cut costs improve efficiency The Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents BOR and The Ohio State University will enter into an agreement regarding the operations and management of the newly formed Ohio Technology Consortium or OH TECH By merging the Ohio Academic Resources Network Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC Ohio Learning Network OLN and shifting all IT personnel from OhioLINK into a single consortium the chancellor can leverage existing strengths for each organization and trim administrative costs technological and management duplication and inefficiency OH TECH will function as the umbrella organization for OSC s cutting edge research and OARnet s expansion of the broadband network to Ohio higher education K 12 schools and state and local government The consortium will also provide the IT infrastructure to the BOR and offer cutting edge and innovative student services for higher education customers in Ohio By establishing a more efficient technology consortia we will be better able to allocate resources and more effectively concentrate on the core mission to advance higher education said Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Jim Petro After factoring in potential severance costs associated with the staff reductions the consolidation results in estimated savings of 650 000 for the first year Once the merger of the consortia is complete the goal will be to look for additional efficiencies

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/highered.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • NSF funds research to simulate geoscience field trips
    limestone strata lying beneath a cap layer of sandstone Mammoth Cave National Park was established in 1941 to preserve the elaborate cave systems and protect unique plants and animals found above and inside the caves The two year proof of concept research project Expanding Geoscience Diversity through Simulated Field Environments for Students with Physical Disabilities seeks an alternative environment to the physically demanding conditions encountered during field study conditions that have led to a an underrepresentation of graduates with mobility impairments in the geosciences Traditionally performed outside of the laboratory geology is the study of the interrelationships between the natural processes that have shaped the earth over billions of years said Christopher L Atchison Ph D recently a graduate research assistant at OSC and now an assistant professor of geoscience education at GSU Although there are many sub disciplines within the geosciences that create different opportunities this science does not lend itself well to those who are physically unable to venture past the controlled laboratory setting In addition to structural data the research team previously obtained from the Cave Research Foundation they also will gather high precision data collected by laser remote sensing technology called LIDAR Light Detection And Ranging and through high resolution digital photography of specific geological formations needed for the training The data will be integrated into a virtual environment to emulate a typical field outing that will then be explored and evaluated for usability by a representative group of students with mobility impairments selected and supported by Ohio s STEM Ability Alliance To test the effectiveness of the virtual experience the research team will place the students in the various environments and evaluate their ability to convey their understanding of the content through questions asked during the simulation as well as online surveys conducted immediately following the simulation sessions Through this experience students will better inform the creation and development of a synthetic environment tailored to emulate a geological field study explained Don Stredney OSC senior research scientist for biomedical applications and director of the center s interface laboratory Additionally the students experiences will assist the developers in creating an environment that is tailored to their abilities as well as in establishing a sense of realism based on their experiences within the actual field site In developing a very basic simulation demo for an earlier planning study the team processed a polygon mesh model to make it compatible with a freely available 3 D gaming engine Following the application of texture maps to the mesh a player controlled camera with a headlamp was added to the program The research team designed the final demo to be run as a stand alone program or in a web browser on both Windows and Macintosh computer platforms By working with the content experts the research team will develop interactions within the virtual environment to allow users to call up additional information about the cave and karst system A karst is an area of irregular limestone that has been eroded

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/Mammoth.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Evolutionary computation offers flexibility, insight
    green shows the current average fitness value for the population in each generation Columbus OH August 2 2011 A Franklin University professor recently developed an evolutionary computation approach that offers researchers the flexibility to search for models that can best explain experimental data derived from many types of applications including economics Esmail Bonakdarian Ph D To test the algorithm underlying that approach Esmail Bonakdarian Ph D an assistant professor of Computing Sciences and Mathematics at Franklin leveraged the Glenn IBM 1350 Opteron cluster the flagship system of the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC Every day researchers are confronted by large sets of survey or experimental data and faced with the challenge of making sense of this collection and turning it into useful knowledge Bonakdarian said This data usually consists of a series of observations over a number of dimensions and the objective is to establish a relationship between the variable of interest and other variables for purposes of prediction or exploration Bonakdarian employed his evolutionary computation approach to analyze data from two well known classical public goods problems from economics When goods are provided to a larger community without required individual contributions it often results in free riding However people also tend to show a willingness to cooperate and sacrifice for the good of the group While OSC resources are more often used to make discoveries in fields such as physics chemistry or the biosciences or to solve complex industrial and manufacturing challenges it is always fascinating to see how our research clients employ our supercomputers to address issues in broader fields of interest such as we find in Dr Bonakdarian s work in economics and evolutionary computing said Ashok Krishnamurthy interim co executive director of the center Evolutionary algorithms are inherently suitable for parallel or distributed execution Bonakdarian said Given the right platform this would allow for the simultaneous evaluation of many candidate solutions i e models in parallel greatly speeding up the work Regression analysis has been the traditional tool for finding and establishing statistically significant relationships in research projects such as for the economics examples Bonakdarian chose As long as the number of independent variables is relatively small or the experimenter has a fairly clear idea of the possible underlying relationship it is feasible to derive the best model using standard software packages and methodologies However Bonakdarian cautioned that if the number of independent variables is large and there is no intuitive sense about the possible relationship between these variables and the dependent variable the experimenter may have to go on an automated fishing expedition to discover the important and relevant independent variables As an alternative Bonakdarian suggests using an evolutionary algorithm as a way to evolve the best minimal subset with the largest explanatory value This approach offers more flexibility as the user can specify the exact search criteria on which to optimize the model he said The user can then examine a ranking of the top models found by the system In addition to these measures

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/Bonakdarian.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • XSEDE project brings advanced cyberinfrastructure, digital services, and expertise to nation’s scientists and engineers
    of local computing hardware at sites around the country advanced supercomputers at larger centers generally available software packages and fast networks Ideally they should all work together so the researcher can move from local to national resources transparently and easily XSEDE and the experts who lead the program will make that ideal a reality Through this project we hope to work with universities around the country to formalize computational science education programs and prepare a future workforce that can apply computational modeling to solve challenging science and engineering problems said Steven Gordon Ph D who is interim co executive director at Ohio Supercomputer Center Gordon will lead the XSEDE education program XSEDE will replace and expand the TeraGrid project that started more than a decade ago More than 10 000 scientists used the TeraGrid to complete thousands of research projects at no cost to the scientists That same sort of work only in more detail generating more new knowledge and improving our world in an even broader range of fields will continue with XSEDE The TeraGrid really helped invent the concept of having digital resources like supercomputers tools and expertise spread across the country and allowing researchers to easily use them said John Towns of the University of Illinois s National Center for Supercomputing Applications Towns will lead the XSEDE project and also had a variety of roles in the TeraGrid project This is much more than just the same old resources that TeraGrid offered Towns said XSEDE will take the next step by lowering technological barriers to access and use We are creating a distributed cyberinfrastructure in which researchers can establish private secure environments that have all the resources services and collaboration support they need to be productive The XSEDE User Access Layer for example will provide a comprehensive

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/XSEDE.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OSC lifts OSU land speed racer toward 400-mph goal
    new vehicle will be to surpass all previous electric vehicle records In 2004 the team achieved distinction on the speedway at Bonneville Salt Flats in Wendover Utah by setting the U S electric land speed record at just over 314 mph with the original Buckeye Bullet a nickel metal hydride battery powered vehicle Several years later the team returned with the Buckeye Bullet 2 a completely new vehicle powered by hydrogen fuel cells and set the international land speed record for that class at nearly 303 mph The team then replaced the power source once again using the same frame and body with a new generation of lithium ion batteries and set an international electric vehicle record in partnership with Venturi Automobiles and A123 Systems at just over 307 mph OSC has been a partner of the Buckeye Bullet team throughout the project s history said Ashok Krishnamurthy OSC interim co executive director We ve been extremely pleased to provide computational resources and technical assistance to the student engineers as they learn valuable computational science skills that they can easily transfer to careers in the automotive industry and elsewhere This spring the Buckeye Bullet team again in partnership with Venturi and A123 Systems began the development process for a completely re engineered vehicle designed to break the 400 mph mark In consideration of that blistering speed one of the first critical aspects the team had to consider was the aerodynamic design of the vehicle This goal places the team in direct competition with many of the fastest internal combustion cars in the world said Cary Bork chief engineer for the team and an OSU graduate student in mechanical engineering What sets the new design apart from the previous Buckeye Bullet vehicles is that at these higher speeds it is possible to produce shock waves under the vehicle Such shock waves under the vehicle negatively affect the vehicle drag and can produce lift Lift is undesirable in this application Minimizing or eliminating these shock waves is critical to ensuring the safety and stability of the vehicle Carey Bork For both versions of the Buckeye Bullet 2 student engineers ran aerodynamics simulations on OSC computer systems to compliment studies of physical models tested in wind tunnels However the current team quickly found that wind tunnels with a rolling road component required to test land bound vehicles at the target speeds don t exist Rizzoni and Bork therefore leveraged the flagship IBM 1350 Opteron Cluster at OSC to run extensive simulations initially focusing on validating performance of Buckeye Bullet 2 and eventually giving shape to the lean new streamliner We re using computational fluid dynamics CFD to design and optimize the vehicle shape said Cary Bork a graduate student and chief engineer for the project The simulations are needed to accurately predict the aerodynamic forces on the vehicle at these speeds and can only be run on large computing clusters Various mesh sizes have been used from 1 million to 50 million cells

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/CAR.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Middle school girls to learn science, math, technology skillsMiddle school girls to learn science, math, technology skills
    subjects and careers by engaging them practical interesting scientific studies The students also will hear from women who work in diverse industries throughout the week about different career opportunities We provide the YWSI participants with an immersive experience said Kathryn Kelley director of YWSI Not only do the girls engage in hands on investigation of an issue with real life impacts they also are surrounded by female mentors who guide them through every step of the process Throughout the weeklong residential program students learn to test the chemical properties of streams take field trips to the stream and Ohio State University research labs and stay in residence halls on the OSU campus Students will learn how to apply the scientific method to analyze the health of Ohio watersheds through both physical observation and computer modeling and analysis The students will visit Darby Creek a state and national scenic river southeast of Columbus and compare the test results obtained on site to their group s watershed projects based on Ohio Environmental Protection Agency data During the final ceremony at OSC the girls will present their findings to an audience of scientists OSU administrators parents teachers and staff Through annual surveys and longitudinal studies conducted in 2004 and 2010 YWSI participants have indicated that the program positively influenced them During the most recent study approximately 74 percent of the students who participated in YWSI indicated that their interest in science and or math classes increased since their participation in the program more than 75 percent of the participants conveyed they had greater confidence in math and science classes since participating in YWSI Five teachers selected for the program also benefit by gaining experience in project based teaching using modeling programs to guide research and learning and effectively integrate technology into classroom activities YWSI is a program of the center s Ralph Regula School of Computational Science and was sponsored this year by Battelle American Electric Power Procter Gamble Insight Dana Rogers The Ohio State University Campus Campaign and OSC For more information about the YWSI program for sixth and seventh grade girls please visit www ywsi org Editors The list below arranged by last name identifies the students and teachers who will participate in YWSI this year 2011 YWSI participating students Rama Balasubramaniam Sells Middle School Kayla Caswell Fallen Timbers Middle School Eliza Fisher St Vincent Elementary Kristiana Gresham Davis Middle School Melissa Gu Olentangy Liberty Middle School Autumn Harvey Kettering Middle School Ashwini Kamath Wilson Elementary Anitra Karthic New Albany Middle School Mikayla Knerr Village Academy School Amelia Lee Henry Karrer Middle School Ellora Majumber Grizzell Middle School Madeline Smith Kettering Middle School Salmika Wairegi Berwick Alternative Elementary School Athena Williams Licking Heights Middle School Annie Zou Phoenix Middle School 2011 YWSI participating teachers Katie Hendrickson Athens Middle School Laura Kramer Calumet Christian School Kristi Krupp Bowling Green Middle School Jenny Lang Alexander Local Schools Rachel Micic Upper Arlington High School Paula Williams Bowling Green Middle School lead teacher 2011 YWSI

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/YWSI2011.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Scientists model physics of a key dark-energy probe
    more accurate understanding of certain aspects of large scale structure such as the effect of the expansion of the universe on the growth of density fluctuations Knowing how the dark matter reacts to the expansion of the universe is crucial for learning the most about dark energy and dark matter from large astronomical surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey of which OSU is a collaborating member said Orban In particular there is a subtle clustering feature seen in this data set called Baryon Acoustic Oscillations BAO which turns out to be very useful for constraining cosmological parameters like the equation of state of dark energy The oscillations come from fluctuations in the distribution of hot plasma in the early universe researchers can identify this feature by measuring the cosmic microwave background The BAO signature gets imprinted on the dark matter very early on but the feature changes over cosmic time potentially biasing its use as a cosmological tool Orban explained It s a complicated non linear problem and physicists are very fond of simplifying complicated problems to gain a more in depth understanding This is exactly what we did for the first time in our paper using N body simulations For current state of the art astronomical surveys the main non linear effects that we investigate in the paper are negligible compared to other sources of error but next generation surveys will need to be far more sophisticated in this regard said Orban s academic advisor David Weinberg Ph D who is a professor of astronomy at OSU and the project scientist for the Sloan Survey This places the utmost importance on making reliable and precise predictions for these non linear effects a task which cosmological N body simulations are in many ways well suited to do Since early 2009 Orban and Weinberg have employed nearly 200 000 processor hours of computational time on the OSC s flagship Glenn Cluster and eight terabytes of storage space on its Mass Storage Environment The Glenn Cluster offers researchers more than 9 600 Opteron cores 24 terabytes of memory and a peak computational capability of 75 teraflops which translates to 75 trillion calculations per second For software the researchers employed the state of the art Gadget 2 N body code to calculate the trajectories of more than a hundred million particles and set the initial conditions using the 2LPT code developed by their collaborators at New York University This research project represents a fantastic conjunction of people and disciplines observed Ashok Krishnamurthy co executive director of OSC It brought together professionals in the fields of physics astronomy and computational science to produce impressive results that might not otherwise have come together for many years OSC is proud to have contributed to these achievements Orban and Weinberg authored a paper on this research Self similar Bumps and Wiggles Isolating the Evolution of the BAO Peak with Power law Initial Conditions which is slated for publication in the journal Physical Review D The project

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/orban.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OSC-Led Team to Develop Apps on Intel® Many Integrated Core Architecture
    material sciences The findings will be jointly presented by OSC and Intel at the Supercomputing Conference in November 2011 Intel will also provide OSC with early access to the first commercial Intel MIC coprocessors code named Knights Corner enabling OSC to ensure that workloads achieve maximum performance on these first Intel MIC coprocessors We are excited to be an early evaluator of the Intel MIC Architecture since it promises to provide performance and power efficiency similar to GPU based solutions on highly parallel workloads but most importantly without the need for new programming models said David Hudak Ph D program director for cyber infrastructure and software development at OSC We see this as an important contribution in the research community and beyond since the same well established software tools and techniques used for Intel Xeon processor based systems can also be applied to the Intel MIC Architecture Intel MIC Architecture can support existing parallel programming models like OpenMP MPI and Intel Threading Building Blocks and we see real promise in Intel s tool implementations In addition Intel s support for other parallel programming solutions such as Intel Cilk Plus and Intel Array Building Blocks provide a unique opportunity to expand parallel solutions As discussed at the International Supercomputing Conference last week the path to exascale will not only take research in new technologies and architectures but will also require a deep understanding of how to adapt applications to take advantage of these developments said Anthony Neal Graves vice president Intel Architecture Group and general manager Many Integrated Core Computing Intel OSC s work in studying applications for extreme parallelism on Intel MIC Architecture will help us gain this understanding and ultimately help make exascale computing both more achievable and more practical The Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC provides a robust shared

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/oscteam.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •