archive-edu.com » EDU » O » OSC.EDU

Total: 329

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Surveillance research group meets to review year’s work
    meeting earlier this week at the Ohio Union at The Ohio State University The Center for Surveillance Research CSR is a National Science Foundation Industry University Cooperative Research Center that was organized a year ago to develop a principled theory and advanced practice for modern surveillance systems CSR is a collaborative effort by academia government and industry to conduct pre competitive research and student training for the next generation of technology leaders The primary focus of this week s meeting was to review research projects conducted over the last 12 months and to consider proposals for new or continuing programs for the next year said Alan Chalker program manager for CSR as well as director of Client Engineering for the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC Also students involved in the program demonstrated the progress of their research projects during a poster session interacting with numerous professionals in the field of surveillance In addition to participants from The Ohio State University OSU Wright State University WSU and OSC the meeting drew surveillance specialists from the Air Force Research Laboratory the Army Research Laboratory SAIC Etegent Technologies Boeing and Raytheon CSR members at the March 28 29 meeting also discussed strategies to expand participation to additional industry government and academic organizations Details on CSR activities including affiliate membership benefits and requirements can be found at csr osu edu or by contacting Chalker at alan osc edu The CSR partnership benefits from the strong and complementary nature of existing academic research programs at both OSU and WSU In the surveillance area OSU has strengths in video surveillance and machine learning distributed sensor networks hyper spectral imaging radar image exploitation human factors and multi sensor integration Wright State University brings expertise in information theory for automated threat recognition radar system design including waveform diversity and

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/csr.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • At SxSW Interactive, Sensable Customers on “Stop the Bleeding!” Panel Advocate for Better Surgical Training With Touch-enabled Simulation
    way to train the next generation of surgeons worldwide and Sensable s role in furthering the trend All three members of a panel discussion on advanced medical simulation entitled Stop the Bleeding have deployed sophisticated medical simulation applications using Sensable s Phantom haptic devices and OpenHaptics software toolkit This includes a touch enabled temporal bone surgical simulator from the Ohio Supercomputer Center that was recently used by Nicaraguan ear nose throat ENT surgical residents as part of a humanitarian initiative and two representatives of BioDigital a 3D medical simulation firm with its touch enabled dental nerve block injection simulator created by professors at the University of California at San Francisco Dental School With cadavers being expensive often hard to access and providing limited practice opportunities along with escalating concerns over patient safety Sensable s customers at the SxSW panel will give attendees the opportunity to feel how adding the sense of touch to medical simulations can create better learning environments for surgeons to attain and perfect their clinical skills with zero risk to patients WHERE South by Southwest Interactive Conference Austin TX Hilton Austin Salon H 500 East 4th Street WHAT Stop the Bleeding Immersive Simulations for Surgeons using the Sensable family of Phantom haptic devices WHEN Saturday March 12 at 9 30 am CT WHO Dr Gregory Wiet Associate Professor Otolaryngology Nationwide Children s Hospital The Ohio State University Frank Sculli and John Qualter Partners Co Founders BioDigital INTERVIEWS Available on request contact Sensable 978 685 3136 The touch enabled simulators to be showcased during the SxSW Stop the Bleeding panel include Virtual Temporal Bone Surgery Simulator whose real time interactive computer simulations help surgeons learn the difficult and delicate surgical techniques associated with ear surgery that requires drilling into a bone in the skull called the temporal bone During his fourth annual trip to Escuela Hospital Antonio Lenin Fonseca in Managua Nicaragua in January 2011 Dr Greg Wiet and team performed several days of delicate ENT surgeries and during this visit the team also delivered touch enabled training to otolaryngology residents using the simulator As a country where cadaveric materials are hard to access Nicaragua typifies the setting where advanced surgical simulators can play an important role in training and provide the humanitarian benefit of helping to ensure that patients can access even highly specialized clinical skills from local ENT surgeons Dental Nerve Block Injection Simulator which teaches dental residents how to perform an inferior alveolar nerve IAN block one of the most common but more difficult dental injections since the exact location for the injection must be identified by nearby anatomical landmarks and with a restricted range of sight Developed in concert with Dr Janice Lee of UCSF and her colleagues the Nerve Block Injection Simulator is built upon the BioDigital Platform a software solution upon which numerous medical simulators can be developed About Sensable Founded in 1993 Sensable remains the leading developer of touch enabled solutions and technology that allow users to not only see and

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/senasble.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Study analyzes role of PARP enzyme in eukaryotes
    wide range of organisms animals plants molds fungi algae and protozoa whose cells contain complex structures enclosed within membranes While PARP proteins can be found with any of these supergroups they have been most extensively studied in mammals In these organisms PARPs have key functions in DNA repair genome integrity and epigenetic regulation said Lamb More recently it has been found that proteins within the PARP superfamily have a broader range of functions that initially predicted The researchers used computers to identify 236 PARP proteins from 77 species across five of the six supergroups Lamb then accessed the Glen Cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC to perform extensive phylogenetic analyses of the identified PARP regions This is computationally intensive work that would have been impossible without the computer resources provided at OSC Lamb said In particular the ability to try a variety of tools that require a great deal of CPU and memory capabilities was essential for success Amongst other tools she employed the PhyML3 0 software package which fit a statistical model to the aligned sequence data and provided estimates for the model s parameters Dr Lamb s project is an excellent example of a scientist running a very domain specific software package on our state of the art systems said Ashok Krishnamurthy Ph D interim co executive director of OSC While the center maintains a large collection of licensed and open source software there are occasions where very specialized or customized applications are required Our staff mdembers are very good at working with researchers to modify these codes to get them installed running and delivering results Access to powerful OSC systems allowed the researchers to experiment with a wide variety of options and parameters in order to achieve the best results Lamb noted PARPs are found in

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/rslamb.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Grant funds simulation & modeling study at Youngstown firm
    Senior Counselor for Manufacturing Policy Ron Bloom Council on Competitiveness President CEO Deborah Wince Smith front Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce Brian P McGowan President s Senior Advisor for Manufacturing Policy Sean McClure University of Chicago Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics Donald Lamb United States Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra National Center for Supercomputing Applications Private Sector Program Director Merle Giles and Council on Competitiveness Computer Scientist in Residence Rob Neeley Washington DC March 2 2012 The White House today announced a 5 million grant to the Ohio Supercomputer Center and several partner organizations to support the advanced manufacturing efforts of midwestern small and medium sized manufacturers SMEs Representatives from the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC the Ohio Board of Regents OBR The Ohio State University Procter Gamble PolymerOhio and the Council on Competitiveness were among those present as White House and Department of Commerce officials formally announced the Economic Development Administration grant for the Midwest Project for SME OEM Use of Modeling Simulation and Analysis The federal officials also formally signed a memorandum of understanding between the federal government and the participating Original Equipment Manufacturers OEMs The EDA project will introduce modeling simulation and analysis MS A to supply chain manufacturers in Ohio Illinois Indiana and Michigan who do not alone have the resources to implement this technology into their workflow The grant funds efforts in the four state region over the first 18 months and creates a five year public private partnership that will then expand the initiative nationally The Obama Administration expressed its commitment to building a 21st century manufacturing economy by supporting small business development to create the technologies and industries of the future The influx in technology is intended to promote job retention supply chain growth new exports and reshoring OSC will receive nearly 2 million of the 5 35 million public private partnership project and will serve as one of four resource providers with a number of subject matter experts working with SME enterprises to help them adopt MS A in their business process OSC experts will extend specialized web portals and create additional portals derived from OEMs to assist manufacturing suppliers This initiative is a perfect example of industry and academic organizations working together to directly address the technical barriers costs and training necessary to effectively use advanced technologies in manufacturing said Ashok Krishnamurthy interim co executive director at OSC By leveraging each other s strengths we can create an advanced manufacturing supply chain that uses modeling and simulation tools to greatly increase American competitiveness The center has been working to promote MS A to manufacturers through its internationally recognized Blue Collar Computing program OSC will work with OEMs to assist their suppliers to bring production up to code and to speed products to market enhancing global competitiveness In addition OSC will stand up a high performance computational cluster valued at 500 thousand to be used as a platform for computational work required by small and large industry partners The award comes on the

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/coc.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OSC partners with P&G on modeling and simulation projects
    industry academic partnerships that drive the state s economic competitiveness to new heights said Caroline Whitacre vice president for research at Ohio State Having the innovative resources of the Ohio Supercomputer Center located at Ohio State and being able to help drive research innovation at an industry powerhouse such as P G are the types of collaboration we seek to foster Under the terms of the two year master alliance agreement the OSC will provide P G with access to the center s computational systems and collaboration on modeling and simulation projects OSC s IBM Glenn Cluster flagship system features 9 500 cores 24 terabytes of memory and a peak computational capability of 75 teraflops This critical partnership accelerates the innovation process so that we can propel better designed products into the global marketplace said Tom Lange director of corporate research and development modeling and simulation at P G This project is aimed at making us more competitive while also providing significant benefit to the university community by furthering its educational and research objectives OSC s widely recognized industrial outreach program Blue Collar Computing provides modeling simulation and analysis resources to businesses both large and small to refine their products to a degree that could not be achieved with in house resources More than 30 large and small companies have used OSC computational facilities hardware software and expertise to stay competitive in the international marketplace This noteworthy project is a natural extension of the strategic partnership that OSC has had with P G for many years said Ashok Krishnamurthy interim co executive director at OSC Along with supporting our Blue Collar Computing program this collaboration will enhance our ability to better serve Ohio industry A master alliance agreement between the Ohio State and Cincinnati based P G simplifies the legal

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/osupgosc.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Doctors deliver high-tech training to Central America
    doctors and medical students Drs D Richard Kang and Gregory Wiet pediatric otolaryngologists from Nationwide Children s Hospital and The Ohio State University OSU visited Escuela Hospital Antonio Lenin Fonseca in Managua Nicaragua in January This was their fourth annual trip to the facility which serves as the country s focal point for medical and surgical training Kang Wiet Upon arrival the two surgeons conducted their typical schedule of a day of outpatient evaluation followed by several days of delicate surgeries including airway and middle ear procedures In addition they provided training to otolaryngology residents and attending physicians through both lectures and the surgical procedures they performed The unique aspect to this year s visit however was Kang and Wiet s presentation of a virtual temporal bone dissection course Participants were trained on the unique Virtual Temporal Bone surgery simulation system developed at Nationwide and OSU in conjunction with the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC through funding from the National Institutes of Health RO1 DC006458 The system creates real time interactive computer simulations for surgeons to learn the difficult and delicate surgical techniques associated with ear surgery which involves drilling into a bone in the skull called the temporal bone explained Don Stredney senior research scientist for biomedical applications at OSC whose team helped develop the simulation Because the temporal bone lies close to a major artery and critical nerves for the face learning to perform the surgery can be tricky Without a virtual simulation environment medical residents would learn this surgery by working on cadavers and through apprenticeships in an operating room Through multi institution validation studies Stredney and Wiet believe that this simulation technology will increase the efficiency of a resident s training while also raising his or her proficiency Ultimately they assert this innovation could provide a safe cost effective way to provide students with experience in the early stages of developing surgical technique The system makes use of a laptop computer with powerful graphics processing capability and a haptic device which provides force feedback This feature simulates for the surgical trainee the feel of the drill interacting with the temporal bone the portion of the skull just behind the temples and above the ear With this type of training surgeons are not only learning with their eyes but also with their sense of touch noted Wiet This could be an important tool in the learning process for surgeons to develop all their senses in order to guide their surgery A pilot phase of the system received the prestigious Dr Frank H Netter Award for Special Contributions to Medical Education from the Vesalius Trust for Visual Communication in Health Sciences in 2008 The award recognizes the person or persons who have recently developed visually oriented educational materials with either proven or potential impact on the way health sciences are taught and or practiced Kang and Wiet plan to continue to return to Nicaragua on a regular basis not only to provide care for the population but also to

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/simulator.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Computer-assisted diagnosis tools to aid pathologists
    computer assisted diagnosis tools that will provide pathologists grading Follicular Lymphoma samples with quicker more consistently accurate diagnoses The advent of digital whole slide scanners in recent years has spurred a revolution in imaging technology for histopathology according to Metin N Gurcan Ph D an associate professor of Biomedical Informatics at The Ohio State University Medical Center The large multi gigapixel images produced by these scanners contain a wealth of information potentially useful for computer assisted disease diagnosis grading and prognosis Follicular Lymphoma FL is one of the most common forms of non Hodgkin Lymphoma occurring in the United States FL is a cancer of the human lymph system that usually spreads into the blood bone marrow and eventually internal organs A World Health Organization pathological grading system is applied to biopsy samples doctors usually avoid prescribing severe therapies for lower grades while they usually recommend radiation and chemotherapy regimens for more aggressive grades Accurate grading of the pathological samples generally leads to a promising prognosis but diagnosis depends solely upon a labor intensive process that can be affected by human factors such as fatigue reader variation and bias Pathologists must visually examine and grade the specimens through high powered microscopes Processing and analysis of such high resolution images Gurcan points out remain non trivial tasks not just because of the sheer size of the images but also due to complexities of underlying factors involving differences in staining illumination instrumentation and goals To overcome many of these obstacles to automation Gurcan and medical center colleagues Dr Gerard Lozanski and Dr Arwa Shana ah turned to the Ohio Supercomputer Center Ashok Krishnamurthy Ph D interim co executive director of the center and Siddharth Samsi a computational science researcher there and an OSU graduate student in Electrical and Computer Engineering put the power of a supercomputer behind the process Our group has been developing tools for grading of follicular lymphoma with promising results said Samsi We developed a new automated method for detecting lymph follicles using stained tissue by analyzing the morphological and textural features of the images mimicking the process that a human expert might use to identify follicle regions Using these results we developed models to describe tissue histology for classification of FL grades Histological grading of FL is based on the number of large malignant cells counted in within tissue samples measuring just 0 159 square millimeters and taken from ten different locations Based on these findings FL is assigned to one of three increasing grades of malignancy Grade I 0 5 cells Grade II 6 15 cells and Grade III more than 15 cells The first step involves identifying potentially malignant regions by combining color and texture features Samsi explained The second step applies an iterative watershed algorithm to separate merged regions and the final step involves eliminating false positives The large data sizes and complexity of the algorithms led Gurcan and Samsi to leverage the parallel computing resources of OSC s Glenn Cluster in order to reduce

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/lymphoma.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • OSC, Nationwide Children’s use supercomputers to speed diagnoses
    the parents worst fear their 18 month old little girl had neuroblastoma a rare pediatric cancer that involves the adrenal glands Several years ago every child diagnosed with neuroblastoma would have received a standardized treatment regimen of chemotherapy bone marrow transplant surgery and radiation With the advancements in omics genomics proteomics etc technologies and the aim to support personalized medicine physicians would have the capability to modify this one size fits all approach through advanced computation Physicians may now look at 10 to 12 different genes with a neuroblastoma tumor and conduct a complete biological and molecular analysis that leads to a diagnosis and treatment recommendation tailored to the child s genetics Medical data is often so complex that using visualization to track the progression of the disease and potential cures is still computationally intensive Visualization technologies can help simplify and magnify the drug identification process and greatly assist medical researchers in developing faster more personalized medical solutions Working from an agreement inked last year to collaborate on informatics services the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC and The Research Institute at Nationwide Children s Hospital have begun offering a production environment services and support to speed discovery techniques of childhood diseases from pediatric cancers to muscular dystrophy Our intent is to assist institutions and medical professionals by developing innovative and cost effective solutions to enhance their research and translational initiatives said Dave Billiter director of the Research Informatics Core at Nationwide Children s Biopathology Center We believe this partnership with OSC will aid in transforming pediatric patient treatment by adding a translational component to speed the bench to bedside process essential to biomedical findings Under the agreement OSC provides The Research Institute with production level storage computation and software for running simulations on the Center s sophisticated systems In 2009 the

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2011/oscnationwide.shtml (2013-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •