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  • Young women celebrate their scientific achievements
    celebrated their many accomplishments at a final ceremony attended by parents teachers and staff at the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC YWSI was designed by OSC to help young women develop a deeper interest in the fields of science technology engineering and math or STEM by solving a practical interesting scientific problem During the week students conducted hands on streamside quality monitoring and chemical testing of Darby Creek a state and national scenic river just southeast of Columbus They then analyzed their samples with the latest in computer technology comparing their results with Ohio Environmental Protection Agency data for their small group watershed projects Participants also interacted with successful women scientists to learn about their professional contributions to math engineering and science fields Throughout the weeklong residential program students shared in activities at OSC took field trips to the creek and specialized Ohio State University facilities and stayed in residence halls on the OSU campus YWSI provides girls with not only the skills but also the confidence to pursue science and technology fields said Kathryn Kelley director of YWSI If this class s enthusiasm and proficiency during the activities are a good indication they stand to make strong contributions in these fields in the not too distant future Through annual surveys and longitudinal studies conducted in 2004 and 2010 YWSI participants have indicated that they learn a great deal from the program One participant commented in her final program evaluation I liked everything I especially liked the way it was designed so that we got to experience many different types of science the way we got to explore OSU and how we learned so much Five teachers selected for the program also benefited by gaining practical experience in project based teaching using real data to teach and conduct research and learning

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/YWSI2010.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Fish, visualization experts to track species in Gulf oil spill
    and a Louisiana ichthyologist are using Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC systems to help map data on the extent of the spill and chemicals and the distribution of various fish species We know very little about deep sea life and even less about the interactions between this biota and these toxic chemicals said Prosanta Chakrabarty Ph D an assistant professor of ichthyology at Louisiana State University The northern Gulf of Mexico is home to over 600 species of fish and new ones are being described every year Through our efforts and by making the informatics tools available over the Web our aim is to map baseline data about nearly every northern Gulf of Mexico species that may be impacted Several universities and federal agencies including NASA NOAA and USGS are focused on tracking the oil and dispersants on the surface of the Gulf and in shallow waters and marshes To complement these efforts the researchers are repurposing a computer application that was designed to track infectious diseases to collect and reinterpret data for oil dispersants and fish including those at great depth We have developed DEPTHMAP depthmap osu edu a web accessible mapping application for historical species collection records to combine baseline information about the range of these species with respect to data on the extent of the spill said Daniel Janies Ph D an associate professor of Biomedical Informatics at The Ohio State University From museum records wildlife and fisheries collections data we can measure the impact of this spill on marine species with various habitats life histories and ranges Janies has created several applications to track the avian influenza virus H5N1 and more recently to monitor the H1N1 virus on a real time geographic information system Janies and his colleagues teamed up with OSC staff to tune these codes to run on the Center s IBM Cluster 1350 Glenn system which features 9 500 cores and 24 terabytes of memory Now wildlife data are being mapped onto a similar real time geographic information system to show researchers which species habitats are located in the region of the Gulf affected by the spill over time Without historical baseline data like that we are mapping future faunal surveys will not illustrate the impact of this deep water oil spill said Janies We will make the maps and underlying informatics tools we develop available to a wide community of users via the web such that other resource managers and researchers can leverage our efforts for a wide variety of species of interest The species being tracked will include commercially important grouper snapper and croaker species as well as ecologically important species near the bottom or top of the food chain including batfishes and sharks Data collected at intervals since the spill began is being incorporated and compared to show changing distributions deaths lost spawning seasons and year classes and potentially extinctions Unfortunately the deployment of an unprecedented amount of dispersant at the well head a mile below the surface has created plumes

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/oilspill.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Moldex3D donates over $1M in software licenses to extend OSC’s training program to manufacturers
    050 000 in support of OSC s Ralph Regula School of Computational Science education program Moldex3D eDesign provides industrial designers easy and efficient 3 D solutions in product development Using parallelized simulation packages manufacturers can analyze part design for manufacturing optimization beyond what is offered by standard CAD and CAM applications Moldex3D will be included in OSC s partnership with PolymerOhio which offers its membership a one stop resource that bundles modeling and simulation services with training in computation and 3 D modeling training as well as access to commercial software These educational software licenses provide a strong boost in the types of training we offer to higher education and industry through our baccalaureate minor associate degree and industry certification programs said Steve Gordon interim co executive director of OSC and director of the Ralph Regula School for Computational Science The certificate program is supported in part by grants from the National Science Foundation As part of its Blue Collar Computing offerings OSC will provide manufacturers with the training and computational resources needed to use advanced modeling and simulation to test processes and product design Industries participating in the OSC s Blue Collar Computing program gain access to its advanced modeling and simulation resources and services in order to reduce the time and expense involved in determining proof of concept and designing new products as well as to improve production efficiency The program also uses custom designed web portals to give businesses secure easy access to processing power and mass storage systems without the need for in house infrastructure or computational science expertise Partnering with OSC allows us to demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of Moldex3D eDesign package for training purposes said Venny Yang president of CoreTech System Co Ltd the company that produces Moldex3D Manufacturers will be able to

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/Moldex.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Talented students learn about technology, teamwork
    and Engineered Targets in the Department of Physics Summer Institute teaches STEM basics to future tech experts Columbus Ohio July 6 2010 Four teams of talented high school students just completed two weeks of intensive study at Summer Institute where they searched for new comets programmed for obstacle avoidance enhanced a virtual surgery application or researched cellular communication The 21st class of students graduated from Summer Institute SI during the annual residential STEM enrichment program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC held June 20 July 2 2010 on the campus of The Ohio State University Throughout their two week stay sixteen high school freshmen sophomores and juniors from across Ohio conducted university level research on OSC supercomputers interacting with scientists who provided tours of their labs and assisted with sponsored research The Summer Institute students are now part of a successful international community of professors company owners and world renowned thinkers said Jim Giuliani SI director We were amazed at how wonderfully inquisitive and enthusiastic this year s students were in developing new approaches to problems Working in four project teams the students solved practical yet complex science and engineering problems In the process they developed and applied fundamental computing skills in areas such as programming languages and techniques operating systems and visualization SI participants also learn how to work with each other in various team building activities I understood programming before but in abstract terms said Tom Shkurti a participant from Upper Arlington High School Learning what an algorithm does in the real world was something of a new experience for me and an enlightening one During a final ceremony the students presented their findings to parents staff and researchers based on the following projects Comet Search Project The team wrote a program to process NASA satellite images to identify and track comet movement Obstacle Avoidance Roomba Project The team reprogrammed a common high tech household appliance to auto navigate around a set of obstacles Medical Image Visualization Project The team rendered a temporal bone and optimized block sizes for performance and realism using GPU Raycasting and CUDA programming Biomedical Cellular Organization Project The team determined how cells communicate with each other and with collagen fibers to grow new tissue Through OSC s Ralph Regula School of Computational Science OSC provides a variety of education programs to encourage student interest in science technology engineering and math careers This year more than 50 K 12 students will participate in these programs which include SI Young Women s Summer Institute for middle school girls the Choose Ohio First bioinformatics program and internships for nearby Metro High School students In this ever more complex global and knowledge economy those who embrace new technologies will be those who will succeed and lead tomorrow said Steve Gordon OSC interim co executive director during the final ceremony We at OSC believe Summer Institute provides talented students a rare opportunity to further develop interests in both technology and learning SI 2010 was sponsored by AMD and

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/SummerInstitute2010.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Ohio Supercomputer Center and Sciences Computers Consultants forge alliance to expand offerings to international clients
    SCC numerical simulations applications are used by companies in high technology fields within the polymer energy automotive and food industries SCC has procured from OSC a startup package that consists of 2 500 production level compute cycles and advanced technical support As part of the biannual agreement SCC will receive up to 150K CPU hours and 250GB of storage per year as well as 20 user accounts for each project outside network connectivity and technical support SCC intends to install its flagship software product XimeX on OSC s systems for scalability testing and small pilot projects OSC and SCC will partner with PolymerOhio to select businesses from the polymer industry to serve as pilot case studies for the advanced simulation portals being developed PolymerOhio will offer its membership a one stop resource that bundles modeling and simulation services with computation and processing training and access to commercial software We see this as a logical step to expanding the Blue Collar Computing program as SCC is a leader in software applications for the polymer industry and Ohio contains over 2800 companies concentrated in this industry segment said Alan Chalker program director for OSC s Blue Collar Computing Industries participating in the Blue Collar Computing program gain access to its advanced modeling and simulation resources and services in order to reduce the time and expense involved in determining proof of concept and designing new products as well as to improve production efficiency The program also uses custom designed portals to give businesses secure easy access to processing power and mass storage systems without the need for in house infrastructure or computational science expertise Partnering with OSC allows us to develop a significant toehold in the U S to answer industrial needs for process analysis and validation material behavior analysis and other engineering

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/SCC.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Ohio Supercomputer Center serves new research groups with launch of ‘Csuri’ Advanced GPU Environment
    The conference will provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussing approaches research findings and educational experiences arising from computational investigations of biological problems Next year the conference returns to Athens Ohio where the inaugural conference was held in 2006 Other conferences were held in Oxford 2007 Toledo 2008 and Cleveland 2009 The 2011 version of OCCBIO will become the Great Lakes Bioinformatics conference to expand involvement to a larger audience An important goal of the conference continues to be fostering long term collaborative relationships among practitioners in the field The three day meeting is designed for experts in bioinformatics as well as non experts who make substantial use of bioinformatics tools in their work or would like to expand such use Over the past few decades major advances in molecular biology and genomic technologies have led to an explosive growth in the biological information generated by the scientific community This deluge of information led to the development of large sophisticated computer databases to store organize and index the data and for specialized tools to view and analyze the information A bottleneck in the analyses has developed though due to insufficient numbers of broadly educated and computationally skilled people who are able to understand the biological principles behind the data engage in multi disciplinary talk and generally make sense of the data being collected The Ohio Bioinformatics Consortium which supports OCCBIO is striving to meet the demand by enhancing educational opportunities and research infrastructure The consortium s goal is to make Ohio a world leader in bioinformatics and to facilitate new discoveries in data intensive biomedical research Featured speakers for this year s conference will be Ward Wheeler Ph D curator of the Division of Invertebrate Zoology at the American Museum of Natural History Wolfgang Sadee Ph D Felts Mercer Professor of

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/bioohio.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Doctoral candidate devises genetic prediction algorithm
    complex optimized algorithms that he estimated would have taken him more than three and half years to run on a typical desktop computer Shepard s research introduces a novel algorithm for the prediction of certain genomic sequences known as exons and introns using mid range sequence patterns of 20 to 50 nucleotides in length These genomic patterns are said to display a non random clustering of bases referred to as mid range inhomogeneity or MRI We based our approach on Markov chain models which are the basis for many gene prediction programs Shepard explained During the project our algorithm read 12 million nucleotides of exons and introns each and three million each were used to test the predictions Markov models are built using the analysis of short DNA words However recent research showed multiple types of non random associations of nucleotides within genomic regions of 30 to 1000 nucleotides long that form specific sequence patterns Shepard and his team hypothesized that the MRI patterns were different for exons and introns and would serve as a reliable predictor To circumvent the limitations of traditional Markov models Shepard developed a technique known as binary abstracted Markov modeling BAMM The procedure involves creating rules that reduce mountains of nucleotide information into a much smaller binary code based upon word length and the nucleotide bases found within those words For instance if looking for a sequence rich in guanine Shepard might break the sequence into three letter words and assign the binary code of 1 to each word containing 2 or more guanines and 0 to each word that doesn t Shepard was able to test his abstraction rules for words of one or two nucleotides locally at the University of Toledo As more bases are used to create each binary digit however the possible abstraction outcomes increased exponentially requiring far more computational horsepower To test rules for longer word lengths Shepard turned to the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC and its flagship system the 9500 node IBM Cluster 1350 Shepard and fellow student Andrew McSweeny accessed the Glenn Cluster to optimize the abstraction process by using hill climbing techniques that determine a single maximal value for each abstraction space rather than each of its possible values The trials required approximately 116 individual supercomputer jobs each using 128 computer cores 32 physical nodes and taking a little over two hours of wall time per round Shepard said Total optimization for the tetranucleotide abstraction rule took more than ten and a half days for 324 million abstraction rules Researchers at Ohio universities are fortunate to have at their disposal the resources of the Center when their investigations require computational resources beyond those found on their campuses said Yuan Zhang client and technology support engineer at OSC Beyond the big hardware OSC also offers researchers the expertise to prepare their jobs to run efficiently on parallel systems Shepard and his colleagues then combined different abstraction models to improve accuracy Using support vector machine technology they achieved a

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/shepard.shtml (2013-06-13)
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  • Battery pack modeling & simulation key to PHEV success
    State University recently collaborated with the Ohio Supercomputer Center OSC to better understand the characteristics and behavior of large battery packs A vehicle s battery management system BMS monitors and protects the battery pack prolongs its life and keeps it ready to deliver full power when called upon The BMS equalizes the voltage drawn from each of the cells and interfaces with other on board systems such as engine management climate control communications and safety The power needs for extended all electric operation of plug in hybrid electric vehicles PHEVs require much more on board energy than typically provided by the nickel metal hydride batteries found in standard gasoline electric hybrids According to experts PHEVs will be commercially viable and mass produced once engineers refine the lithium ion battery and management systems needed to support the range and power demanded by consumers The current engineering solution is to link several parallel strings of lithium ion battery cells within a battery module and to link several modules into larger battery packs However until now these configurations had not been empirically tested to determine how the state of charge SoC deviation and therefore battery life is affected by changing temperature and energy load on individual cells Yurkovich first identified the model parameters of individual battery cells from various makers by using a 72 node cluster computer that he had helped construct at CAR Each cell in a battery pack is unique said Yurkovich who earned a bachelor s degree in computer science last year and will add a master s degree in mechanical engineering from OSU this summer They vary in manufacturing variability cell history and existing conditions such as temperature current and state of charge These factors must be considered by a battery management system to achieve optimum voltage equalization Yurkovich turned to The MathWorks numeric computation and visualization software known as MATLAB He devised a battery model based on the experimental battery cell data and simulation algorithms to analyze voltage current and SoC deviation of parallel strings of batteries With assistance through OSC s Remote MATLAB Services RMS Yurkovich transitioned his MATLAB scripts to run on 200 nodes of OSC s IBM Cluster 1350 supercomputer Nicknamed the Glenn Cluster OSC s flagship system features 9 500 cores 24 terabytes of memory and a peak computational capability of 75 teraflops which translates to 75 trillion calculations per second The simulations considered two different battery pack configurations profiles for both hybrid and plug in hybrid vehicles three different temperatures two different variations of internal resistance and capacity three different states of charge and three different variations for the standard deviation Yurkovich explained Each simulation contained 10 000 parameter varied individual pack Monte Carlo calculations In less than eight hours the Glenn Cluster computed more than a million successful individual iterations of Yurkovich s model He estimated that it would have taken a year and a half to run his algorithms on his desktop computer and more than a week to run them

    Original URL path: http://archive.osc.edu/press/releases/2010/yurkovichBattery.shtml (2013-06-13)
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