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  • Publications | Olesik Research Group
    912 98 104 Newsome Toni E Joseph W Zewe and Susan V Olesik Electrospun nanofibrous solid phase microextraction coatings for preconcentration of pharmaceuticals prior to liquid chromatographic separations Journal of Chromatography A 2012 1262 1 7 Clemmons Jacqueline Lauren Henderson Tamanda Chanza Kenneth LaiHing Michael Beilke and Susan V Olesik Fabrication of a hydrophobic nanofiber protective coating for an electrochemiluminescent detector In ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 2012 Vol 243 1155 16TH ST NW WASHINGTON DC 20036 USA AMER CHEMICAL SOC Philibert Gwenaëlle S and Susan V Olesik Characterization of enhanced fluidity liquid hydrophilic interaction chromatography for the separation of nucleosides and nucleotides Journal of Chromatography A 2011 1218 45 8222 8230 Pomeranz Cherie N and Susan V Olesik Separation of poly 3 hydroxyvalerate co 3 hydroxybutyrate through gradient polymer elution chromatography Journal of Chromatography A 2011 1218 44 7943 7947 Borteh Hassan M Nicholas J Ferrell Randall T Butler Susan V Olesik and Derek J Hansford Peptide induced patterning of gold nanoparticle thin films Applied Surface Science 2011 258 1 230 235 Treadway James W Gwenaelle S Philibert and Susan V Olesik Enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography for hydrophilic interaction separation of nucleosides Journal of Chromatography A 2011 1218 35 5897 5902 You Jia Liwen Wang Motoyasu Saji Susan V Olesik Matthew D Ringel David M Lucas John C Byrd and Michael A Freitas High sensitivity TFA free LC MS for profiling histones Proteomics 2011 11 16 3326 3334 Susan V Olesik Joseph w Zewe U S Patent Application 13 582 339 Justin W Shearer Clark J E Clark Susan V Olesik Optimization of electrospinning an SU 8 negative photoresist to create patterned carbon nanofibers and nanobeads Journal of applied polymer science 2010 118 1 405 412 Jonathan E Clark Susan V Olesik Electrospun glassy carbon ultra thin layer chromatography devices Journal of Chromatography A 2010 1217 27 4655 4662 Joseph w Zewe Jeremy K Steach Susan V Olesik Electrospun Fibers for Solid Phase Microextraction Analytical Chemistry 2010 Published to Web Jonathan E Clark Susan V Olesik Technique for Ultrathin Layer Chromatography Using an Electrospun Nanofibrous Stationary Phase Analytical Chemistry 2009 81 10 4121 4129 Dave F Farson Hae Woon Choi Burr Zimmerman Jeremy K Steach Jeffery J Chalmers Susan V Olesik L James Lee Femtosecond Laser Micromachining of Dielectric Materials for Biomedical Applications Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering 2008 18 3 035020 1 035020 9 Susan V Olesik Enhanced Fluidity Mixtures Fundamental Properties and Chromatography Advances in Chromatography 2008 46 423 449 Justin W Shearer Lunhan Ding Susan V Olesik Solvation Parameter Models for Retention on Perfluorinated and Fluorinated Low Temperature Glassy Carbon Stationary Phases in Reversed Phase Liquid Chromatography Journal of Chromatography A 2007 1141 1 73 80 Lunhan Ding Susan V Olesik Carbon Microbeads Produced Through Synthesis and Pyrolysis of Poly 1 8 dibutyl 1 3 5 7 octatetrayne Chemistry of Materials 2005 17 9 2353 2360 Matthew Giardina Lunhan Ding Susan V Olesik Development of Fluorinated Low Temperature Glassy Carbon Films for Solid

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/olesik.1/publications/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Research | Olesik Research Group
    well as the analysis time Nanofibrous materials are also valuable for solid phase microextraction SPME These devices provide large surface areas per weight of nanomaterial which allows for improved extraction efficiency for a range of compounds of interest such as pharmaceuticals in waste water and herbicides in natural waterways II Ordered carbon materials Glassy carbon surfaces have at least two different types of carbon available as interaction sites edge plane and basal plane carbon Using highly unsaturated oligomers as precursors to glassy carbon or templating methods we are evaluating the possibility of improving chromatographic separations using carbon stationary phases by controlling the homogeneity of the carbon surface III Enhanced fluidity Liquid Chromatography EFLC Enhanced fluidity liquids EFL also called gas expanded liquids GXL are solvent mixtures containing high proportions of a liquefied gas These liquid mixtures have mass transport properties rates of diffusion and viscosity that are intermediate between those of liquids and supercritical fluids Significant increases in the rate of diffusion cause corresponding improvements in the chromatographic efficiency Another strong attribute of EFLs is that while the mass transport properties are improved by adding large proportions of liquefied gases the solvent strength of the liquid is maintained to a value close to that of the original mixtures In the past we have shown that by using EFLC the speed of the separation and the efficiency improve for mixtures of moderately polar analytes We are currently moving this technology toward applications that include highly polar mixtures such as those in biological systems For example nucleotide and nucleoside separations without gradient elution methods are now viable IV Nanofibers for SALDI and ME SALDI Electrospun carbon and polymer nanofibers were studied as possible substrates for surface enhanced laser desorption ionization Using the carbon nanofibers organic polymers could be observed using SALDI ionization

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/olesik.1/research/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Photos | Olesik Research Group
    Tel 614 292 0733 Lab Rooms 3015 3017 McPherson Lab Tel 614 292 6327 Group Office Room 3005 McPherson Lab Tel 614 292 6327 Mailing Address Dr Susan Olesik Department of Chemistry 100 W 18th Ave Columbus OH 43210 Email

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/olesik.1/46-2/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Group News | Pei Group
    Alumni Contact Resources Group News May 18 2015 Cyclic peptidyl Ras inhibitor paper is recommended in F1000Prime Inhibition of Ras Signaling by Blocking Ras Effector Interactions with Cyclic Peptides published this May in Angew Chem Int Ed DOI 10 1002 anie 201502763 has been recommended by F1000Prime May 11 2015 Cyclic peptidyl Ras inhibitor paper is highlighted in C EN as News of The Week Inhibition of Ras Signaling by

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/pei.3/group-news/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Research | Pei Group
    acid based drugs e g siRNA We recently discovered a small cyclic peptide cyclo Phe Nal Arg Arg Arg Arg Gln as an exceptionally active membrane transporter We are currently studying its mechanism of cell entry searching for transporters of still higher activity and applying the transporters to deliver small molecules peptides proteins and nucleic acids into human cells Macrocycles as Protein Protein Interaction Inhibitors Protein protein interactions represent a very exciting but also extremely challenging class of drug targets because their binding sites are usually flat surfaces to which conventional small molecules molecular weight 500 do not bind with high affinity or specificity We and others have found that macrocycles molecular weight of 500 2000 are very effective inhibitors of protein protein interactions We have recently developed a methodology to chemically synthesize and screen large libraries of natural product like cyclic and bicyclic peptides We are now applying this method to develop macrocyclic inhibitors against a variety of protein protein interactions involved in human diseases e g cancer diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis Discovery of Ligands of Protein Binding Domains In eukaryotic cells many protein protein interactions are mediated by small protein binding domains e g SH2 PTB BIR BRCT BUZ and PDZ domains which recognize short peptide motifs in their partner proteins We employ a chemical bioinformatics approach to identify the in vivo binding partners of these domains First a protein domain is screened against a peptide library to identify its peptide recognition motif s The peptide motif is next used to search the human proteome to identify its potential cellular targets Finally the putative interactions are validated in vivo by cell biology and or proteomics methods Identification of Kinase and Phosphatase Substrates In addition to protein protein interaction physical event cells use posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation chemical

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/pei.3/research/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Medicinal Chemistry & Drug Discovery | Pei Group
    reach an intracellular target This is especially problematic for peptide protein and nucleic acid based drugs e g siRNA We recently discovered a small cyclic peptide cyclo Phe Nal Arg Arg Arg Arg Gln as an exceptionally active membrane transporter We are currently studying its mechanism of cell entry searching for transporters of still higher activity and applying the transporters to deliver small molecules peptides proteins and nucleic acids into human cells Macrocycles as Protein Protein Interaction Inhibitors Protein protein interactions represent a very exciting but also extremely challenging class of drug targets because their binding sites are usually flat surfaces to which conventional small molecules molecular weight 500 do not bind with high affinity or specificity We and others have found that macrocycles molecular weight of 500 2000 are very effective inhibitors of protein protein interactions We have recently developed a methodology to chemically synthesize and screen large libraries of natural product like cyclic and bicyclic peptides We are now applying this method to develop macrocyclic inhibitors against a variety of protein protein interactions involved in human diseases e g cancer diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis Additional Reading 120 Cell Permeable Bicyclic Peptide Inhibitors against Intracellular Proteins J Am Chem

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/pei.3/research/medicinal-chemistry/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Chemical Biology | Pei Group
    employ a chemical bioinformatics approach to identify the in vivo binding partners of these domains First a protein domain is screened against a peptide library to identify its peptide recognition motif s The peptide motif is next used to search the human proteome to identify its potential cellular targets Finally the putative interactions are validated in vivo by cell biology and or proteomics methods Identification of Kinase and Phosphatase Substrates In addition to protein protein interaction physical event cells use posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation chemical event to mediate and regulate cellular processes More than a third of human proteins are reversibly phosphorylated on 100 000 serine threonine and tyrosine residues by the opposing actions of 500 protein kinases and 100 phosphatases We use a chemical bioinformatics approach to identify the protein substrates of kinases and phosphatases A peptide library is screened against a kinase or phosphatase of interest to determine its substrate specificity profile The consensus sequence s is then used to search the protein databases to identify its potential protein substrates which are subsequently validated by cellular techniques Additional Reading 118 Diverse Levels of Sequence Selectivity and Catalytic Efficiency of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Biochemistry 2014 53 2 397

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/pei.3/research/chemical-biology/ (2015-07-10)
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  • Publications | Pei Group
    of Sequence Selectivity and Catalytic Efficiency of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Nicholas G Selner Rinrada Luechapanichkul Xianwen Chen Benjamin G Neel Zhong Yin Zhang Stefan Knapp Charles E Bell and Dehua Pei Biochemistry 2014 53 2 397 412 The sequence selectivity of 14 classical protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPs PTPRA PTPRB PTPRC PTPRD PTPRO PTP1B SHP 1 SHP 2 HePTP PTP PEST TCPTP PTPH1 PTPD1 and PTPD2 was systematically profiled by screening their catalytic domains against combinatorial peptide libraries All of the PTPs exhibit similar preference for pY peptides rich in acidic amino acids and disfavor positively charged sequences but differ vastly in their degrees of preference disfavor Some PTPs PTP PEST SHP 1 and SHP 2 are highly selective for acidic over basic or neutral peptides by 105 fold whereas others PTPRA and PTPRD show no to little sequence selectivity PTPs also have diverse intrinsic catalytic efficiencies kcat KM values against optimal substrates which differ by 105 fold due to different kcat and or KM values Moreover PTPs show little positional preference for the acidic residues relative to the pY residue Mutation of Arg47 of PTP1B which is located near the pY 1 and pY 2 residues of a bound substrate decreased the enzymatic activity by 3 18 fold toward all pY substrates containing acidic residues anywhere within the pY 6 to pY 5 region Similarly mutation of Arg24 which is situated near the C terminus of a bound substrate adversely affected the kinetic activity of all acidic substrates A cocrystal structure of PTP1B bound with a nephrin pY1193 peptide suggests that Arg24 engages in electrostatic interactions with acidic residues at the pY 1 pY 2 and likely other positions These results suggest that long range electrostatic interactions between positively charged residues near the PTP active site and acidic residues on pY substrates allow a PTP to bind acidic substrates with similar affinities and the varying levels of preference for acidic sequences by different PTPs are likely caused by the different electrostatic potentials near their active sites The implications of the varying sequence selectivity and intrinsic catalytic activities with respect to PTP in vivo substrate specificity and biological functions are discussed 117 Screening Bicyclic Peptide Libraries for Protein Protein Interaction Inhibitors Discovery of a Tumor Necrosis Factor α Antagonist Wenlong Lian Punit Upadhyaya Curran A Rhodes Yusen Liu and Dehua Pei J Am Chem Soc 2013 135 32 11990 11995 Protein protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets because their large flat binding sites lack well defined pockets for small molecules to bind We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small molecule scaffolds With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein protein interactions Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor α TNFα identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα induced cell death Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein protein interactions 116 Profiling the Substrate Specificity of Protein Kinases by On Bead Screening of Peptide Libraries Thi B Trinh Qing Xiao and Dehua Pei Biochemistry 2013 52 33 5645 5655 A robust high throughput method has been developed to screen one bead one compound peptide libraries to systematically profile the sequence specificity of protein kinases Its ability to provide individual sequences of the preferred substrates permits the identification of sequence contextual effects and nonpermissive residues Application of the library method to kinases Pim1 MKK6 and Csk revealed that Pim1 and Csk are highly active toward peptide substrates and recognize specific sequence motifs whereas MKK6 has little activity or sequence selectivity against peptide substrates Pim1 recognizes peptide substrates of the consensus RXR H R X S T it accepts essentially any amino acid at the S T 2 and S T 1 positions but strongly disfavors acidic residues Asp or Glu at the S T 2 position and a proline residue at the S T 1 position The selected Csk substrates show strong sequence covariance and fall into two classes with the consensus sequences of D E EPIYϕXϕ and D E E D S E D I YϕXϕ where X is any amino acid and ϕ is a hydrophobic amino acid Database searches and in vitro kinase assays identified phosphatase PTP PEST as a Pim1 substrate and phosphatase SHP 1 as a potential Csk substrate Our results demonstrate that the sequence specificity of protein kinases is defined not only by favorable interactions between permissive residue s on the substrate and their cognate binding site s on the kinase but also by repulsive interactions between the kinase and nonpermissive residues 115 Specificity Profiling of Protein Phosphatases toward Phosphoseryl and Phosphothreonyl Peptides Qing Xiao Rinrada Luechapanichkul Yujing Zhai and Dehua Pei J Am Chem Soc 2013 135 26 9760 9767 A combinatorial library method was developed to systematically profile the substrate specificity of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl pS and phosphothreonyl pT peptides Application of this method and a previously reported phosphotyrosyl pY library screening technique to dual specificity phosphatase DUSP VH1 of vaccinia virus revealed that VH1 is highly active toward both pS pT and pY peptides VH1 exhibits different and more stringent sequence specificity toward pS pT than pY substrates Unlike previously characterized protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPs the activity and specificity of VH1 are primarily determined by the amino acid residues C terminal to the pS pT or pY residue In contrast the mammalian VH1 related VHR DUSP has intrinsically low catalytic activity toward pS and pT substrates suggesting that its primary physiological function is to dephosphorylate pY residues in substrate proteins This method is applicable to other DUSPs and protein serine threonine phosphatases and the substrate specificity data will be useful for identifying the physiological substrates of these enzymes 114 Inhibition of Ras effector Interactions by Cyclic Peptides Xianghong

    Original URL path: https://research.cbc.osu.edu/pei.3/publication/ (2015-07-10)
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