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  • Spatial and Temporal Cetacean Distribution
    Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Spatial and Temporal Cetacean Distribution Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Marine Mammal Studies Project Description The Gulf of California constitutes 39 of all marine mammal species and a third of all cetacean species in the world It is therefore one of the most biologically diverse seas on the planet In the Gulf of California the Kino Bay area and adjacent waters area important meeting place for many year round residents and winter migrant cetacean species Currently the Kino Bay Research Center has recorded 18 cetacean species The continuous monitoring and evaluation of species diversity in the region provides important baseline data for the future development of scientific and management projects Since 1997 the MMP has kept a registry of all cetacean species sighted At every sighting data is recorded regarding various associated environmental and biological factors This is in order to gain a better understanding the diversity and seasonality of the cetaceans in the region Project Results In the last five years the Center has completed 189 outings and accumulated 124 effort hours in which we have recorded 876 sightings of 13 species of cetaceans representing 5 families The species with the largest number of recorded individuals are the Long beaked Common Dolphin 88 000 the Bottlenose Dolphin 6 500 the Short finned Pilot Whale 1 100 and the Fin Whale 700 With all of our current data we have information regarding the spatial and temporal distribution of cetaceans within Kino Bay and the surrounding area From 1997 to 2009 799 sightings of 18 species of cetaceans during 177 outings were recorded The results from the time period of 1997 2003 of this project were presented in 2004 at the Gulf of California Conference hosted by the Arizona Sonoran Desert Museum Reports Publications Lindner D J 2011 Habitat Use Characterization of Sperm Physeter macrocephalus and Fin Balaenoptera physalus Whales in the Midriff region of the Gulf of California through Incidental Sighting Analysis via Geographic Information Systems Senior Project for College of the Atlantic 19 pp Research and

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/marine-mammal-studies/spatial-and-temporal-cetacean-distribution.php (2016-02-13)
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  • Marine Mammal Program
    the President Academics Undergraduate Degrees Graduate Degrees Faculty Mentor Guides The Prescott Difference Academic Calendar Course Schedules Non Degree Academic Resources Community Campus Resources Exchange Opportunities Orientation Colloquium Apply Application Forms for All Programs Resident Undergraduate Degrees Resident Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Undergraduate Programs Limited Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Marine Mammal Program Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Marine Mammal Studies Photo By Naomi Blinick Photo Gallery The Gulf of California constitutes 39 of all marine mammal species and a third of all cetacean species in the world It is therefore one of the most biologically diverse seas on the planet All of the marine mammal species present in the Gulf of California are protected either nationally or internationally Marine mammal research in the Midriff Island Region and in particular Kino Bay has been sporadic and limited to certain areas The Kino Bay Center recognized the importance of studying the regions cetaceans and created the framework for the Marine Mammal Program MMP in 1997 collaborating at the outset with various principally Mexican institutions At that time the work with cetaceans was divided into three parts 1 Sperm whale photo identification 2 Fin whale photo identification and 3 recording incidental cetacean sightings The MMP went through a period of interruption between 2004 and 2008 when there were very few opportunistic outings The program was revived in 2009 with the objectives of contributing to the knowledge of resident and migratory marine mammal populations and offering information about the seasonal and spatial use of the area by various species Another goal of the program is to create opportunities for Prescott College students and members of the community to participate in developing marine mammal research in the region Marine Mammals Projects Cetacean photo identification The photo identification technique is a vital and non invasive tool in biological and ecological studies that utilizes naturally occurring marks on animals Learn more Spatial and Temporal Cetacean Distribution The Gulf

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/marine-mammal-studies/index.php?show_desktop_mode=false (2016-02-13)
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  • Documentation of Sensitive and Commercially Valuable Species in Shrimp Trawler By-catch
    Orientation Colloquium Apply Application Forms for All Programs Resident Undergraduate Degrees Resident Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Undergraduate Programs Limited Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Documentation of Sensitive and Commercially Valuable Species in Shrimp Trawler By catch Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Project Description This study investigated what species are caught in by catch with a focus on monitoring the extent of the extraction of sensitive and commercially important species This was achieved by measuring the landed biomass and the size frequency of the individuals encountered in by catch Project Results In the six years of the by catch monitoring project the presence of many endangered by catch species has been observed These species include the Pacific Seahorse Hippocampus ingens Totoaba Totoaba macdonaldi Loggerhead Turtle Caretta caretta Pacific Angel Shark Squatina californica Scalloped Hammerhead Sphyrna lewini Shovelnose Guitarfish Rhinobatos productus and Golden Cownose Ray Rhinoptera steindachneri all of which are listed on the IUCN Red List under varying degrees of severity from Critically Endangered to Near Threatened Additionally there are several species common in the by catch which have commercial importance to the local panga fishers of Kino whose populations in the Gulf of California have not been subject to scientific investigation These include the Bullseye Pufferfish Sphoeroides annulatus and the Finescale Triggerfish Balistes polylepis and almost all of the 18 species of elasmobranchs As the practice of selling by catch to local panga fishers has become more prevalent researchers have noted a marked increase in the retention of sensitive and commercially valuable species onboard trawlers In a further study data were collected from 18 trawls on one trawler over 4 nights in November of 2009 to address the presence of juveniles in the by catch Through literature reviews it was determined that 100 of Finescale Triggerfish 95 of Bullseye Pufferfish and 80 of male and 78 of female Shovelnose Guitarfish recorded in our study were below the

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/shrimp-trawler-by-catch-studies/valuable-species-shrimp-trawler-bycatch-.php (2016-02-13)
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  • Shrimp Trawler By-catch Monitoring
    Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Undergraduate Programs Limited Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Shrimp Trawler By catch Monitoring Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Project Description Beginning in 1999 on board shrimp trawler studies in the Kino Bay region have been carried out The study began as an educational experience for students in the Marine Conservation class Research relative to the economic development of the fishery and the economic and ecological impacts of by catch mortality resulting from shrimp trawling has been carried out Over the course of the study photographs have been taken of every species and compiled into a Power Point Catalog to be used for training and onboard reference by observer teams In 2009 regional taxonomy experts reviewed the cumulative photo catalogue to ensure correct species identification Project Results Since 2003 by catch from 55 trawls on five boats over 14 nights during November of 2003 2004 2006 2007 2008 and 2009 has been sampled In a six year period ending in 2009 a total of 183 species including 116 species of fish from 55 families 66 species of invertebrates from eight phyla and one sea turtle species have been documented An 85 9 rate of by catch was calculated based on data collected throughout the course of the project Results from this study were used to submit comments to INAPESCA for use in the revisions of the Carta Nacional Pesquera In 2009 data collection protocols were revised and new research questions and methodologies were added to further study the impact of trawling on certain sensitive and or commercially important by catch species The preliminary data from a study in 2009 focusing on certain sensitive and or commercially important by catch species showed a statistically significant percentage of juveniles of certain commercial species being landed as by catch This study highlighted the strong ecological and economic rationale for by catch management within the shrimp fishery of

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/shrimp-trawler-by-catch-studies/shrimp-trawler-bycatch-monitoring.php (2016-02-13)
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  • By-catch Studies
    Research Ethics IRB Employer of National Service Office of the President Academics Undergraduate Degrees Graduate Degrees Faculty Mentor Guides The Prescott Difference Academic Calendar Course Schedules Non Degree Academic Resources Community Campus Resources Exchange Opportunities Orientation Colloquium Apply Application Forms for All Programs Resident Undergraduate Degrees Resident Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Undergraduate Programs Limited Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español By catch Studies Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Photo By Maria Johnson Students working hand in hand with Center researchers and trawler crews Photo Gallery Global shrimp trawling has an average rate of 84 by catch the highest by catch percentage of any fishing industry The shrimp fishery is the most important fishery in Mexico in terms of value exports and employment According to world averages compiled by the FAO global shrimp trawling has an average rate of 84 by catch the highest by catch percentage of any fishing industry and produces one third of global fisheries discards By catch rates in the southern Gulf have been documented between 83 and 97 exemplifying that the percent of by catch from the trawled shrimp fishery in the Gulf is generally higher than the global average The Kino Bay Center has run an ongoing shrimp trawler by catch monitoring project since 2003 with participation from students in the Marine Conservation course offered in fall quarters through Prescott College s Resident Degree Program The data which is collected by students working hand in hand with Center researchers and trawler crews is used to address regional conservation issues by government fisheries managers scientists and local NGO s working towards sustainable fisheries Shrimp Trawler By catch Projects Documentation of Sensitive and Commercially Valuable Species in Shrimp Trawler By catch This study investigated what species are caught in by catch with a focus on monitoring the extent of the extraction of sensitive and commercially important species Learn more Shrimp Trawler By catch Monitoring Beginning

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/shrimp-trawler-by-catch-studies/index.php?show_desktop_mode=false (2016-02-13)
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  • Ecological and socio-economic description and conservation feasibility study for Estero Cardonal
    Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Ecological and socio economic description and conservation feasibility study for Estero Cardonal Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Wetland Studies Project Description Of the three aforementioned estuaries Estero Cardonal is the most pristine with no direct impact from aquaculture development yet it is surrounded by expanding aquaculture facilities In the fall of 2009 the RCP and the Prescott College Marine Conservation class did a conservation feasibility study of Estero Cardonal In order to assess the feasibility and rationale for conservation of this estuary it was necessary to describe the biodiversity and socioeconomic characteristics of the estuary and evaluate the ecological and economic importance of this small wetland Preliminary inventories of plants waterbirds fish and invertebrates were conducted and biological and oceanographic properties of the estuary were documented Furthermore interviews were carried out in the small fishing community This study was designed as a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of and justification for attaining protected status for Estero Cardonal Project Results The preliminary study revealed several factors highlighting the importance of and potential for conservation of Estero Cardonal Indicators for conservation were The estuary is ecologically important as Habitat for neotropical migrants and nesting waterbirds including seven species listed on the NOM 059 SEMARNAT 2001 25 species of Continental or Regional Concern under the Sonoran Joint Venture analysis and two species considered Near Threatened on the IUCN Redlist Habitat supporting five species in numbers close to at or exceeding 1 of regional populations qualifying Estero Cardonal for designation as a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance and an Important Bird Areas Habitat and nursery grounds for several species of commercial importance Habitat for one plant listed on the NOM 059 SEMARNAT 2001 Habitat for nesting sea turtles including Leatherbacks all of which are protected in Mexico There is a real and apparent threat from aquaculture Unique estuarine habitat is zoned for Conservation and can actually be conserved before perturbation if action is

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/wetland-studies/estero-cardonal-ecological-socio-economic-description.php (2016-02-13)
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  • Vegetation community mapping of Estero Cardonal
    Staff Resources for Prospective Students Current Students Alumni Parents Family Faculty Staff Community Featured Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Prospective Students Current Students Alumni Parents Family Faculty Staff Community 877 350 2100 Prescott College Explore History Values Vision Plan a Visit At a Glance Campus Field Stations Student Life Athletics Veterans Research Ethics IRB Employer of National Service Office of the President Academics Undergraduate Degrees Graduate Degrees Faculty Mentor Guides The Prescott Difference Academic Calendar Course Schedules Non Degree Academic Resources Community Campus Resources Exchange Opportunities Orientation Colloquium Apply Application Forms for All Programs Resident Undergraduate Degrees Resident Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Undergraduate Programs Limited Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Vegetation community mapping of Estero Cardonal Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Wetland Studies Project Description In January 2010 the Prescott College Field Methods for Plant Ecology class along with two of the Conservation Fellows conducted fieldwork and GIS analysis to create a vegetation map of Estero Cardonal and the surrounding ejido land Project Results In total 68 species representing 23 plant families were identified Nine unidentified grasses and 12 unidentified non grass species were also recorded In addition 12 vegetation associations were identified and lumped into eight vegetation community types This resulted in a community vegetation map and the establishment of permanent long term survey points that can be used for various future studies Reports Publications Vegetation Community Mapping Project El Cardonal Sonora Mexico 2010 Richard Leslie Brown Anthony Culpepper Jessie Pierson Lucy Woodward and David Hanna Information Center The information center connects community members researchers Learn more Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery The Kino Bay photo database is a searchable and diverse collection of Learn more Find us on Facebook Find the Prescott College Kino Bay Center on Facebook Visit site Español My Academic Interests Please select your academic interests below to

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/wetland-studies/vegetation-community-mapping-estero-cardonal.php (2016-02-13)
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  • Wetland Studies
    877 350 2100 Prescott College Explore History Values Vision Plan a Visit At a Glance Campus Field Stations Student Life Athletics Veterans Research Ethics IRB Employer of National Service Office of the President Academics Undergraduate Degrees Graduate Degrees Faculty Mentor Guides The Prescott Difference Academic Calendar Course Schedules Non Degree Academic Resources Community Campus Resources Exchange Opportunities Orientation Colloquium Apply Application Forms for All Programs Resident Undergraduate Degrees Resident Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Undergraduate Programs Limited Residency Master of Arts Program Limited Residency Master of Science in Counseling Limited Residency Master of Education Limited Residency Ph D Program Education Teacher Preparation Financial Aid Costs and How to Pay Apply Online True Cost Calculator Instant Decision Day Connect Faculty Mentor Guides Highlights Directory Departments Offices Experience News Events Publications Blogs Symposiums Give Ways to Give What to Give Annual Report Explore Endowments Planned Giving Donor Recognition Meet our Staff My Prescott Calendar Email Search Quicklinks Directory Calendar Email My Academic Services My Prescott My Classroom Moodle Library Admissions Financial Aid Virtual Tour Give to Prescott College Sustainability Employment Opportunities Español Wetland Studies Kino Bay Center Home Estero Santa Cruz Ramsar Site Kino Bay Center Photo Gallery Regional Ecology Culture Classes Programs Research Conservation Waterbird Monitoring Studies Marine Mammal Studies Shrimp Trawler By catch Studies Wetland Studies Research Support and Collaboration Environmental Education Community Leadership Indigenous Community Partnership High School Partnerships Information Center Visitor Information Conservation Fellowship News Stories Staff Jobs Internships and Scholarships Donate to the Kino Bay Center Send Us a Message Find us on Facebook Prescott College Home Kino Bay Center Research Conservation Wetland Studies Photo By Naomi Blinick Investigating coastal regions incredibly rich in biodiversity Photo Gallery The estuaries along the Sonoran coast are incredibly rich in biodiversity and hold a very high importance as nurseries for hundreds of species of invertebrates and fish many of which are harvested commercially Migratory and resident birds use these estuaries as stopover wintering feeding and breeding sites Additionally coastal wetlands are the only suitable habitat in Sonora for certain federally protected species like the Clapper Rail Rallus longirostris There are three small to medium sized estuaries on the central Sonoran coast south of Bahia Kino Esteros Santa Cruz Cardonal and Tastiota These precious coastal environments are increasingly threatened by development and tourism activities Since 2000 the shrimp aquaculture industry has expanded dramatically along this coastline These estuaries have received little research or conservation attention while aquaculture has rapidly encroached on these sensitive and unique ecosystems Prescott College is promoting effective and collaborative estuary conservation and research efforts by working with conservation and community groups to discuss the problems define objectives and strategic actions to achieve increased protection of these estuaries Wetland Projects Ecological and socio economic description and conservation feasibility study for Estero Cardonal This study was designed as a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of and justification for attaining Learn more Vegetation community mapping of Estero Cardonal In January 2010 the Prescott College Field Methods for Plant Ecology

    Original URL path: http://www.prescott.edu/kino-bay-center/research-conservation/wetland-studies/index.php?show_desktop_mode=false (2016-02-13)
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