archive-edu.com » EDU » P » PSU.EDU

Total: 24

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    of bringing extinct species back to life but despite the availability of many bones and other remains attempts to read thylacine DNA sequences which should be far easier than trying to clone an extinct animal had so far been largely unsuccessful A team led by Drs Stephan Schuster and Webb Miller at the Pennsylvania State University has now successfully sequenced the DNA found in the mitochondria of two thylacine specimens Our findings are presented in a paper and supplementary material published in the journal Genome Research One of the specimens was from the Smithsonian Institution and much is known about its history The other specimen was from the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm DNA was extracted from hair shafts sequenced and analyzed using techniques pioneered by Schuster Miller and colleagues for the most part these were the same methods that succeeded with the woolly mammoth genome Our data include the mitochondrial sequence of a living marsupial the numbat which we used to help determine how thylacines were related to other mammals This project is a step toward the team s overarching goal of studying museum specimens by using modern methods for determining and analyzing DNA sequences a field

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/ (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    s back and tail protruding from the mother s pouch in the above painting Thus it was more closely related to kangaroos and koalas than to dogs or tigers though unlike kangaroos but like most other Australian marsupials their pouch opens to the back not the front In recent history it was found only in Tasmania though in prehistoric times it also lived on the Australian mainland Tragically this magnificent species became extinct in 1936 when the last known one died in a zoo in Tasmania only about 130 years after the species first encounter with European settlers This was recently enough that there exist movies of zoo specimens There are still occasional unconfirmed reports of thylacine sightings in the Tasmanian forests however few if any scientists believe there is any chance that the species survives A 2006 story reports the existence of 714 known dead thylacine specimens Unfortunately efforts to preserve thylacine specimens were spotty The exquisite Smithsonian specimen that we sequenced is at one extreme however a book by Robert Paddle reports page 232 that the Tasmanian Museum failed in 1936 to preserve the last thylacine and the year before had destroyed five mounted specimens Quick Facts Clade

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/thylacine.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    University press release Genome Research press release A story that ran in the Irish Times reported another factor contributing to the thylacine s extinction collection by museums Apparently at least one thylacine was shot in 1917 at the request of

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/media.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    marsupials In particular we learned that the thylacine s closest living relatives include Tasmanian devils and certain other marsupials e g numbats and quolls that separated from the thylacine lineage around 40 million years ago What kinds of non thylacine DNA were present Not all of the DNA in our samples was from the thylacines In addition to filtering out contaminating DNA from the humans who handled the specimens over

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/research.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    is described in great detail in the excellent book by Robert Paddle The Last Tasmanian Tiger The History and Extinction of the Thylacine Cambridge University Press 2000 One of the controversial claims made in the book pages 22 24 is that thylacines may have survived in mainland Australia into the early 1800s Additional details about the history of the thylacine mother and cubs at the National Zoo in Washington D

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/readings.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    Dr Stephan C Schuster Project Leader Daniela I Drautz Aakrosh Ratan Dr Bob Harris Dr Ji Qi Dr Arthur M Lesk Lynn P Tomsho Michael D Packard Dr Fangqing Zhao Our collaborators outside Penn State Tom Gilbert Daniel Huson Love

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/people.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    free to contact us at scs bx psu edu or webb bx psu edu Alternatively you can write to us at Thylacine Sequencing Project 310 Wartik Lab University Park PA

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/contact.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Thylacine Sequencing Project at PSU
    images of the skin of USNM 125345 young adult male which died in 1905 at the U S National Zoo this was thylacine specimen 1 sequenced in our study Photo

    Original URL path: http://thylacine.psu.edu/thyla1.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive