archive-edu.com » EDU » R » RICHMOND.EDU

Total: 1312

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Search
    Duffie Duel Date s June 8 1822 to June 18 1822 Location CHARLESTON South Carolina Tag s Crime Violence Health Death Law Politics Migration Transportation On June 8 1822 in Savannah Ga Col Cumming and Mr M Duffie carried out a long anticipated duel over a political dispute M Duffie was shot in the back he lived and Col Cumming was not injured M Duffie was a congressman for South

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18220608-18220618 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive


  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Tag s Arts Leisure Economy Education Betting during the earlier decades of the nineteenth century was remarkably more popular among southern citizens than among citizens of the northern states Although forms of gambling were less common up north it was a prevalent facet of southern society in 1821 While New Orleans proved to be the major gambling center in the south even rural South Carolinians were likely to bet on cards dice Oration Delivered to the Charleston Riflemen Date s July 4 1821 Location Tag s Government Slavery Robert Elfe Esq delivered an oration to the Charleston Riflemen about where America has been and where it is going In the printed version he used terms such as liberty and fellow citizens in bold face all caps suggesting that these are words he emphasized in his speech He spoke on the importance of government stating Man s elevation or depression in society is the effect of good or bad laws Mummy Visits Charleston Date s January 31 1824 Location Tag s Arts Leisure Church Religious Activity Health Death Education The Lady of Thebes Mummy was exhibited in Charleston and described in the Charleston Courier on January 31 1824 The mummy was on a tour and had already visited Boston Massachusetts It s coffin was covered in hieroglyphics and it was really a sight to see for the people of Charleston The ancient Egyptian burial rites were a whole different world to the white Christians of South Carolina The Southern Review Date s September 27 1827 Location Tag s Arts Leisure Economy Education Politics Robert Y Haynes of Charleston South Carolina sent a letter to Littleton Waller Tazewell of Norfolk Virginia encouraging Tazewell to lead Virginians in participation via entries and subscriptions to the Southern Review The hand written letter is written

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/11453 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    city As quoted in his letter Your demand for the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts is refused Instead of fighting or surrendering Hardee chose to retreat unharmed leading his troops across a readily built bridge over the Savannah River and out of the city on December 20 Sherman s forces subsequently captured the city on December 21 Following his successful siege of Atlanta in the fall of 1864 it took Sherman and his troops a mere 24 days to march south across Georgia before they reached Savannah the state s largest and most valuable port Sherman encountered little resistance during his March to the Sea and when he arrived outside of Savannah on December 10 the Civil War was essentially over Union General Ulysses S Grant had Robert E Lee pinned down outside of Richmond while Confederate General John Bell Hood had encountered stiff resistance from Union forces in Tennessee The fall of Savannah was not as significant as the capture of Atlanta but it was nonetheless a severe blow to the morale of the Confederacy Sherman used the city as a springboard for his ensuing drive north into South Carolina On February 17 1865 Sherman arrived at the state capital of South Carolina Columbia where his troops set fires that burned the majority of the central part of the city to the ground The next day February 18 1865 Union forces entered Charleston reclaiming Fort Sumter where the war had begun nearly four years prior The Fifty fourth Massachusetts a regiment comprised of African American soldiers marched in singing John Brown s Body a song popular amongst Northern abolitionists Sherman s utter decimation of Georgia and South Carolina in the winter of 1864 and 1865 wholly demoralized white Southerners and ultimately pushed Lee to surrender to Grant

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3389 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Search
    to December 18 1864 Hardee Refuses to Surrender Savannah Date s December 17 1864 to December 18 1864 Location CHATHAM Georgia Tag s Migration Transportation War On December 17 1864 Union General William Tecumseh Sherman and his army were hovering on the doorstep to Savannah Georgia Just four days before on December 13 Union forces had overrun Fort McAllister a Confederate earthwork fortification built primarily for defense against naval attacks

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18641217-18641218 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Union General William Tecumseh Sherman and his army were hovering on the doorstep to Savannah Georgia Just four days before on December 13 Union forces had overrun Fort McAllister a Confederate earthwork fortification built primarily for defense against naval attacks With Fort McAllister toppled Sherman was poised to sack Savannah He sent the head of Confederate A Day of Fasting Humiliation and Prayer Date s August 21 1863 Location Tag s Church Religious Activity Politics On Friday August 21 1863 Reverend Stephen Elliot delivered a sermon to Christ Church in Savannah Georgia In his sermon Elliot compared the plight of Southern citizens to that of the biblical figure Ezra who is thought to have led 5 000 Israelite exiles living in Babylon to Jerusalem in 459 B C As quoted from Elliot s sermon We find ourselves in a condition which calls for a wisdom superior Passage of Shermans Special Orders No 15 Date s January 16 1865 Location Tag s African Americans Race Relations Slavery War Although many regard war as good for absolutely nothing the truth of the matter is that troops are not the only things that advance in war In fact some of the greatest advancements

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/1632 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    being held at a local creek and it would have considered un Christian to refuse passage of a black man to a religious service Many whites justified slavery as a way to spread Christianity to people who would otherwise live without it There were rewards for the return of Tom to the owner B S Thomas that increased depending on the effort involved in Tom s return His description is given as 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high of a bright yellow complexion Tom was not black at least not fully nor was he a stereotypical enslaved person He was literate and worked in a trade for a major company Clearly he had some advantages afforded to him that many plantation field hands lacked and which put him in the perfect position to run away Charleston differed from many Southern towns and counties in its freedoms given to enslaved people Slaves often took care of their own living arrangements and food and made some though very small income Charleston did not have the large plantations and thus it did not have the high demand for manual labor Most owners hired out their slaves most of whom were domestics or skilled in a trade to other individuals to use The owners were paid in return and were able to make profit off their slaves work Many slaves were allowed to retain some of the payment and thus allowed some minor freedoms This autonomy and the ability of many Charleston slaves to read and write made a lot of Charlestonians fear rebellion and runaways Black people had to wear specific badges to identify them as free blacks or hired out slaves The lack of a badge would indicate runaway status Badges were often traded among slaves and free blacks or counterfeited

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3379 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Search
    In early 1815 a charitable religious organization in Norfolk Virginia by the name of the Norfolk Bible Society published its first annual report in the form of a small pamphlet The pamphlet which was presented at the annual meeting of the Society remarked upon both the activities of the Society in the past year as well as the Society s plans for the future The pamphlet stated that the principal A Change in Feminine Duties Date s 1814 Location SUMTER South Carolina Tag s Arts Leisure Race Relations Slavery Women A letter from Mrs Harriet Lucas Huger to her friend Mrs William Lowndes reveals three things one that she had a lot of extra leisure time two that she had a sick father about whom she was concerned and three that she did not like the city of Charleston South Carolina Though her concern for her father s ill health was quite natural it was quite surprising to learn of her distaste for Battle of Fort Bowyer Date s February 8 1815 to February 11 1815 Tag s War This battle was the last battle of the War of 1812 even though a treaty declaring the end of the war had already been signed in Ghent After the British were cruelly defeated in the Battle of New Orleans the British did not want to leave America without striking one last attack against the Americans Major General Lambert commanded the British forces while Lieutenant Colonel William Lawrence Battle of New Orleans Date s January 8 1815 Location ORLEANS Louisiana Tag s War The War of 1812 ended on December 24 1814 with the Treaty of Ghent However one more battle against the British was fought in New Orleans on January 8 1815 before news of the treaty had reached New Orleans

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18150502 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive

  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    of a slave girl by the name of Mary or Mary Ann from Joseph Maybank on the 12th of the same month The advertisement described her as standing 5 8 tall with a yellow complexion and a split front tooth There was an offered award of 20 for her capture and return It was not uncommon for four or more advertisements Free Persons of Color Granted Land for Burial Site Date s August 1816 Location Tag s African Americans Church Religious Activity Health Death Law Race Relations A piece of legislation was passed in August 1816 that granted land to free blacks to create a cemetery This land was not a gift but rather made legally available for purchase The plot was known as Cart s Lot and was located on Boundary Street next to the Methodist Church It was implied that only members of this church would buy and use the land It was specified that no one may be buried after Directory of Charleston 1816 Date s 1816 Location Tag s Government Urban Life Boosterism Women The Charleston Directory and Strangers Guide offered a listing of the residents and businesses of Charleston name address job title if one

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/11452 (2016-02-15)
    Open archived version from archive



  •