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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    assets grand impressive strange tropical now gloomy and awe inspiring now fairy like and charming and again weird and wild nature as writer George Barbour described in his book for Florida tourists The Ocklawaha River flows north from Central Florida ending near Palatka Florida The river stretches over 100 African Americans in the Seminole Hotel Date s 1886 Location Tag s Economy Race Relations african americans Observing the history of Winter Park the Seminole Hotel which was built in 1886 is one location that is significant in many ways to the American Life especially for African Americans The Seminole Hotel was a grand resort in Lake Osceola and it was a vacation destination which attracted many wealthy northerners who were escaping the unpleasant weather from their home towns While it is evident that Eatonville and the Robert Hungerford Industrial School Date s 1888 to 1910 Location Tag s Education for blacks african americans Dr Robert Hungerford is best known for the school in Maitland Florida that was named after him however his willingness and selfless attitude in preaching education is what best characterizes the type of person he actually was Hungerford was a young white physician from Seymour Connecticut who spent a winter in Maitland Florida in hopes of bettering his health While in Maitland he became Job Opportunities at the Seminole Hotel Date s 1886 to 1902 Location Tag s employment african americans In 1886 an impressive hotel was built on Lake Osceola called the Seminole Hotel This hotel was a huge addition to the Winter Park community It consisted of two hundred rooms and provided plenty of activities to entertain the guests such as a bowling alley croquet tennis and a billiard room A bonus of being on the lake was that they were able to offer sailing

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/1443 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    Whig party with no other competing parties The first President of Liberia was a white man born and raised in the Unites States and many of the other party members had no actual African descent Because the political structure was a single party a kind of aristocracy arose among all of the settlers regardless of race seeing themselves as superior to the native people This strained tensions causing conflict between the natives and the settlers as we will examine later The total expenditure for just a few settlements for these 6 thousand people racked up a cost of over 100 000 which was a lot more money than the organizations were receiving from donors This over time resulted in the organizations having to sever support of Liberia staying on as a trustee type figure Unable to pledge any more funds to the forming colony both ASCPS and USACS were only to aid Liberia with advice and political decisions a role that was already filled by the forming aristocratic class making the founding organizations largely useless Because of the inability to produce further aid Liberia was requested by the organizations to declare their independence and did so in 1847 Liberia faced several adverse challenges during the beginning stages of its formation while it was under the leadership of The American Society for the Colonization of the Free People of Color of the United States and the American Colonization Society The native population who apparently was tricked into selling the land the freed slaves were settling had referred to this land as holy causing violent action to rise between the two factions There was also a large amount of goods that the settlers had with them and their general lack of protection making the settlement easy prey for the armed natives Bloody

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4852 (2016-02-15)
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    War Ever since American colonists had moved into Texas relations between the United States and Mexico were at a precarious position President John Quincy Adams had the auspicious task of keeping both sides happy in a desperate attempt to avoid any kind of armed conflict The first of what would become many troubling incidents for both parties occurred on January 21st 1827 Friar Joaquin Aremas Runaway Slaves Date s January 27 1827 Location ST CHARLES Louisiana Tag s African Americans Slavery The harshness of the institution of slavery is something that historians can agree on The lifestyle that enslaved people had to endure is one that many cannot imagine today It is not surprising therefore when slaves wished to be free of their masters and escape from plantations The reasons for slaves running away varied but usually included fear of punishment or resentment because of punishment The National Bank of South Carolina opens up to stock Date s February 1 1827 Location CHARLESTON South Carolina Tag s Economy The bank crisis is one issue that plagues American history during 1827 and throughout the Jacksonian Democracy On February 1st 1827 Charleston opened up its branch of the National Bank of the United States to private stock Limits were placed on the minimum and maximum amount of stock that could be purchased These bonds were meant to help the United States economic problems but many saw a Bankruptcy Bill voted down in Senate Date s February 1 1827 Location Washington City District of Columbia Tag s Economy On February 1st 1827 the United States Senate voted 2 to 1 against a bill presented by Senator Hayne advocating a bankruptcy bill By this time indebtedness was stretching through the country It had become a vicious cycle that most people cannot escape from once

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18270101-18471231 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Maryland The Settlement of Liberia and Hindrances to its Success Date s 1827 to 1847 Location Tag s Liberia Back to Africa During the 1810 s and 1820 s resettlement attempts of African Americans back to Africa took place most of which were largely unsuccessful One of the notable attempts was Liberia where around 6 000 freed slaves were brought to form a colony and escape racial prosecution in North

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/6075 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    By Relevance Chronology The Settlement of Liberia and Hindrances to its Success Date s 1827 to 1847 Location WASHINGTON Maryland Tag s Liberia Back to Africa During the 1810 s and 1820 s resettlement attempts of African Americans back to Africa took place most of which were largely unsuccessful One of the notable attempts was Liberia where around 6 000 freed slaves were brought to form a colony and escape

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/464 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    African American youth and eventually passed away in 1888 The following year the group of Negroes he first worked with in Maitland came together and started a small black school near Maitland naming it the Robert Hungerford School in memory great memory of their mentor The principle of the school was Russell C Calhoun who gained a college education and one of Dr Hungerford s brightest scholars A few years after the school opened Dr Hungerford s father gave the school one hundred and sixty acres of land as a memorial to his son and the school greatly expanded The Robert Hungerford Industrial School was soon established and it provided African Americans with means of learning as well as direct industrial work experience The school owned more than two hundred acres of suitable land for farming and building The students of both sexes would attend school for half of the day and work the other half of the day The county of the school was given two hundred and forty dollars a month to cover the wages of the teachers however the principle nor the treasurer received any pay for their work In a time where the country was going through much racism and hatred toward African Americans education was not viewed as very important This was until Dr Hungerford came into the scene and ultimately transformed education for the African American people of the South His generosity and willingness to help poor African American children was taken very seriously and opened the door for many young men and women The creation of the Industrial School provided real life work experience as well as many different learning opportunities Students came from all over Florida to take part in this excellent program that quickly took off from the very beginning The

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4842 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    was even used in paints Work at this camp started at 6 in the morning but it was the foreman s job to have every man up earlier than that The foreman had 18 men under him and everyone resided in his place he earned around 12 50 a week and received all the firewood and gardening space that he desired In this particular camp there were five chippers seven pullers another five dippers and a wood chopper Work on any gum path in the U S during the 1920 s and 30 s was grim long and often a repetitive and tiring process A picture in the Nassau County Record in 1930 of a Turpentine Distillery illustrates a factory like wooden building similar to what Hurston describes in her essay that was stocked with lumber large jars of gum and was surrounded by an excessive amount of Pine trees Also present in the picture is an all black work force and a variety of tools that were necessary for success in this important industry 1 While the African Americans were working the foreman made it a point to give Hurston the complete tour so she would become familiar with his business He noted that the chipper was the man who made the small slanting cuts on pine trees that excreted the gum The company would pay one cent a tree here 700 or more trees were chipped in a week A puller was a specialized chipper he chipped the trees when they had been worked too high for the chipper Every tree on the camp was chipped for three years pulled for three years and then abandoned The dipper s job was to take the cup off the tree remove the gum and put in back in place in

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4843 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Search
    and the Turpentine Camp Date s March 1939 to 1939 Location Collier Florida Tag s african americans Zora Hurston Turpentine Black Labor Zora Neale Hurston s expedition to a Turpentine camp in Cross City Florida was much more exciting and informative than it sounds Hurston described the start of her trip in an essay she wrote on her experience there as going up some roads and down some others to

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/19390301-19390331 (2016-02-15)
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