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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Schools
    Section Number End Date HST 41 America 1820 1890 2007 2008 08 01 HST 321 History of Urban and Suburban America 2008 12 25 HST 224 American Civil War Era 2009 12 15 HST 223 America 1820 1890 2010 2010 06 02 HST 224 American Civil War Era 2011 05 07 HST 323 Nineteenth Century Urban Epidemics 2012 06 01 HST 321 Urban and Suburban America 2012 12 25 HST

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/schools/view/4 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    who he believed were adequate candidates P P Barbour William C Rives and P V Daniel These men were acceptable because the writer avowed their political preferences are well known Although Tyler identified himself as a Democrat at the time of this letter he opposed many of Jackson s policies and antagonized members of Jackson s administration Additionally he was the only Democrat in the Senate to oppose an act allowing the federal government to ignore South Carolina s policy of nullification In January 1833 Virginia s legislature resolved not to sanction nullification further opposing Tyler s personal belief in states rights This belief eventually overrode Tyler s commitment to Jackson and the Democratic Party In 1836 Tyler resigned from the Senate after the Virginia General Assembly ordered him to support Jackson s policies regarding the Bank of the United States This letter to the Enquirer therefore reflected the Virginia legislature s opinion that Tyler s views ran counter to Virginia s overall political platform Interestingly some of the other candidates mentioned in the letter had connections to Tyler Jackson appointed Barbour as a circuit court judge in Virginia in 1830 and Barbour subsequently became a Jacksonian whom Tyler opposed

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3915 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Schools
    School Abbreviation UVA URL http www virginia edu Courses Using the History Engine Sort By Department and Section Number End Date HIUS 323 01 Rise And Fall of the Slave South 2014 12 01 HIUS 323 Rise and Fall of

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/schools/view/1 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    however Chinese immigrants were barred from becoming citizens of the United States due to the Burlingame Treaty of 1868 and so felt a strong obligation to obey decrees and laws of their homeland On December 26 1910 in the final days of the Qing Dynasty for instance the provisional national assembly decreed that all citizens should cut off the traditional long braid or queue On January 13 1911 the New Orleans Times Democrat reported that the Chinese population of New Orleans welcomed the decree because the braids were burdensome as well as troublesome Around one fourth of New Orleans Chinese immigrants including prominent members of the community like Hom Kin had already cut their queues by this time and most Chinese had ceased wearing traditional Chinese attire Furthermore with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 restricting the flow of new Chinese immigrants into New Orleans the younger generation of Chinese Americans within the city began to lose touch with their cultural heritage Kin s son also queueless expected to be more American in his ways than his Father and American born Chinese readily adopted the language dress and customs of the interracial neighborhoods of Chinatown Many Chinese immigrants lived in nearby interracial neighborhoods though most worked in laundries located throughout the city According to period photographs and research conducted by Richard Campanella the core of China town only consisted of a handful of shops grocers and restaurants along the 150 foot long 1100 block of Tulane Avenue Several other Chinese establishments dotted the surrounding cityscape The district was popular with New Orleanians of all races and social classes who ate at the restaurants shopped at the stores and grocers and took their clothes to the laundry mats They also compelled many Chinese immigrants to abandon their customs in order to

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4438 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    As the supposed daughter of a ruling family in Senegal in West Africa Anna went on to lead a royal lifestyle in Florida and to leave behind a legacy of strength and determination After her purchase at a slave market in Cuba Zephaniah Kingsley 30 years her senior took Anna as his wife and brought her to his plantation Laurel Grove in then Spanish East Florida south of modern day Jacksonville Anna s life story provides a glimpse into the lives of the many African women who were enslaved in the New World and taken as wives by their masters The practice of interracial marriage between slaves and Europeans was not uncommon in Spanish colonial times as society was much more racially mixed than society in English colonies The Spanish treated slaves more humanely than the French and the English and gave them many chances to gain their freedom allowed them to become full citizens after liberation and frequently built families with Africans In fact the first free black town was formed in Spanish Florida Unlike her husband s other numerous slaves who lived in 32 tabby slave shacks Anna Kingsley resided in the Laurel Grove s main plantation house In 1811 just five years after her purchase Anna was unbound from the ties of slavery by her husband By this time the African princess had given birth to three of Zephaniah s children George Martha and Mary The three mulatto offspring of both African and European ancestry were also freed by their Spanish father The couple s fourth child John was later born on Fort George Island Anna Kingsley survived enslavement separation from her homeland and family the Middle Passage across the Atlantic purchase in Cuba and a lifetime of struggle against expanding racist attitudes and laws in Florida

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4840 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Schools
    2008 08 01 RCC 100 Culture Power and Society 2008 12 30 HIS 240 HIS 240 African American History I 2013 08 13 HIS 142 HIS 142 United States History to 1877 2012 12 07 HIS 346 United States Since 1945 2012 12 17 HIS 120 2 Decade of Decision 1950s 2013 05 09 RCC 100 The Comic Book City 2013 12 15 HIS 120 Decade of Decision 1970s 2014

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/schools/view/5 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    properties of the yearly tobacco yield as well as how farmers should pack and present them for sale and production One measure recommended was to be sure to remove all impure tobacco so as not to taint the yield Brown went on to claim that from 1840 to 1850 tobacco production dropped by ten percent in the United States however production increased by ten percent as well He cited these figures as evidence that tobacco would be able to command a good price in 1853 Brown also stated that Virginia s tobacco crop would never be able to compete in terms of quantity with that produced in the western United States therefore farmers in Virginia should strive to tout the superior quality of their tobacco in order to make sales He went on to advise that in order to achieve this quality farmers should take proper care of their soil as well as the crops themselves There is little doubt that tobacco was at the heart of Virginia s prewar economy and Richmond itself was the major trafficking point within the state Farmers from the fertile hills of central Virginia and the Piedmont traveled to Richmond in hopes of securing

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/2610 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    Declaring war was the next step for many United States politicians though not all congressmen agreed on declaring war against Great Britain Federalists and some Republicans had strong concerns about the effects of war on the new nation Virginian John Randolph had previously voiced Republican apprehensions about the implications of the impending war for the United States Randolph worried that American citizens would not want to pay increased taxes and that New England merchants would not support a war that would make their ports vulnerable to the British Randolph tried to convince other Southern Republicans of the possible dangers a war would cause Federalist Laban Wheaton had opposed war with Great Britain since his time in at the Massachusetts Statehouse In 1808 Wheaton presented the Wheaton Resolves in response and opposition to the national Embargo Act James Sullivan a Democratic Republican and Governor of Massachusetts had seen the Federalist Campaign in Massachusetts as a betrayal of President Jefferson and he had feared that opposing the national government would lead to anarchy Sullivan tried to present the Embargo Act in a positive light as a federal action the demonstrated of unity and independence for the nation The Federalist Party had dominated the Statehouse and Wheaton had gained recognition for authoring the resolves Elected to the U S House of Representatives in 1808 Wheaton maintained his Federalist stance through his four terms He joined with other Federalists and some Republicans in resisting the declaration of war in 1812 When the Senate presented the act to the House Federalists and other members who were opposed to war tried to delay the vote Virginia Federalist Daniel Sheffey proposed to postpone the vote indefinitely Along with seventy other House members Massachusetts Federalist Laban Wheaton voted in favor of the motion which was opposed by forty

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/6210 (2016-02-15)
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