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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    permission for the establishment of a frontier settlement Moses contracted pneumonia from four weeks of wet and cold weather on his return trip from Texas to Missouri Moses Austin died on June 10 1821 just two weeks after returning to family in Missouri and thus was unable to see the realization of his envisioned Texas settlement Upon Moses death his son Stephen Fuller Austin received the land grant and thus commanded the plans for the settlement from his home in New Orleans Louisiana The town was to be located at a junction of the Brassos and Colorado rivers and Austin saw to it that the land was surveyed by a ship sailing from New Orleans with the view of ascertaining the best harbor and situation for a Tow at which place a regular port of entry has been ordered to be established by the proper authority Emigration into the territory began on or around Christmas Day of 1821 accompanied by promises of profitable crops by the following summer Stephen F Austin made sure fellow emigrants were explicitly aware of circumstances upon which the ability to join the settlement party were conditional namely that this settlement is forming under the authority

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/1678 (2016-02-15)
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    Nautius captained by a Capt Blair sailed from the port of Norfolk on the morning of Tuesday January 23 1821 The vessel was bound for the coast of Africa and carried on board a number of free blacks seeking or having sought for them a new life in the African colony which would later be termed Liberia Aboard were also a number of clergy from varying denominations ranging from Methodist Sale of Thomas Blackwell s Estate Date s January 11 1821 Location HENRICO Virginia Tag s African Americans Health Death Slavery The Richmond Enquirer the leading newspaper in Richmond Virginia during the first half of the nineteenth century posted a notice from W D Wren the executer of Thomas Blackwell s estate about the sale off this estate to take place on January 15 1821 or the next fair day The sale consisted of all household and kitchen furniture as well as horses several negroes All items were Choctaw Treaty of 1820 Date s October 18 1820 to December 23 1820 Location INDIAN LANDS Mississippi Tag s Migration Transportation Race Relations The United States represented by Generals Andrew Jackson and Thomas Hinds negotiated at Doak s Stand with Mingoes or head men and warriors of the Choctaw nation over land The United States hoped to expand white settlement specifically in Mississippi the Choctaw homeland In return for the Choctaw land President Monroe agreed to a cession of about one fifth of the state of Ratification of the First Treaty of Indian Springs Date s January 8 1821 Tag s Migration Transportation Race Relations Prior to the early 18th Century most of Georgia was home to American Indians belonging to two groups of Native Americans the Cherokee Nation and a southeastern alliance known as the Creek Confederacy The First Treaty of

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18210117 (2016-02-15)
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    completed and successful colonization of a free black settlement on the coast of Africa set up by the U S government Although states in the South such as Virginia saw considerable rallying in support of the Colonization Society there was also staunch opposition on behalf of both blacks and whites No doubt few free blacks living in undesirable conditions saw resettlement in Africa as an attractive option and means by which some who had not been in the states for very long could reunite with family members left behind in Africa however by 1821 the majority of blacks living in the United States were products of one or more generations of life on American soil This prompted feelings of anger and resentment toward organizations like the Colonization Society because though whites spearheading such efforts meant well for the most part they were effectively ripping blacks from their homes and families in the United States to send them to a strange and foreign place a twisted costal role reversal from years past Just as the Africans brought into slavery in the United States were not American the free blacks being taken to Africa from the United States were not African but African American White opposition came from two ends some argued that there was no need for removal and total segregation of the races in order to achieve a peaceful and functioning society Other arguments rested on the tenet of the project s improbability of success cost and length of completion The Brig Nautius captained by a Capt Blair sailed from the port of Norfolk on the morning of Tuesday January 23 1821 The vessel was bound for the coast of Africa and carried on board a number of free blacks seeking or having sought for them a new life in the African colony which would later be termed Liberia Aboard were also a number of clergy from varying denominations ranging from Methodist to Catholic perhaps wit h the hopes of achieving the conversion of those blacks on board who were not yet Christian or perhaps with the hopes of African indigenous contact through which they could spread the word of Christ Boats similar to the Brig Nautius sailed for the African colony from southern ports throughout the decades surrounding 1821 as part of an effort asserted by the American Colonization Society to rid the United States of what they continued to be the inevitable failure of free coexistence of the white and black races Members of the Colonization society wanted the abolishment of slavery as an institution but with that end they also cried for removal of the entire black race This removal they stated would end in the completed and successful colonization of a free black settlement on the coast of Africa set up by the U S government Although states in the south such as Virginia saw considerable rallying in support of the Colonization Society there was also staunch opposition on behalf of both blacks and whites No

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/1679 (2016-02-15)
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    Life Boosterism Moses Austin originally a Connecticut merchant migrated throughout the U S States and western territories developing the lead industry After coming into economic ruin after settling in Missouri he set his sights on economic expansion in Spanish Texas and became the first man to obtain permission to bring Anglo American settlers into the foreign territory Permission was granted for the settlement Cowford Jacksonville Formally Becomes US Territory Date s December 1820 Location INDIAN LANDS Georgia Tag s Agriculture Economy Urban Life Boosterism Following the War of 1812 Isaiah D Hart was living on a farm near the St Mary s River in Florida Learning of the early successes of some small stores opened by white settlers near the Ferry Crossing on the St John s River Hart envisioned great potential for the area Making perhaps the most profitable decision of his life in late 1820 Hart purchased what was then known as Cowford Sale of Thomas Blackwell s Estate Date s January 11 1821 Location HENRICO Virginia Tag s African Americans Health Death Slavery The Richmond Enquirer the leading newspaper in Richmond Virginia during the first half of the nineteenth century posted a notice from W D Wren the executer of Thomas Blackwell s estate about the sale off this estate to take place on January 15 1821 or the next fair day The sale consisted of all household and kitchen furniture as well as horses several negroes All items were Ratification of the First Treaty of Indian Springs Date s January 8 1821 Tag s Migration Transportation Race Relations Prior to the early 18th Century most of Georgia was home to American Indians belonging to two groups of Native Americans the Cherokee Nation and a southeastern alliance known as the Creek Confederacy The First Treaty of Indian

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18210123 (2016-02-15)
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    service to effectively spread among the people of Portsmouth Gall brought ice to the homes of his customers in a horse drawn wagon Gall delivered ice daily to his customers A Plot is Uncovered Date s January 29 1820 Location Tag s African Americans Migration Transportation Race Relations Slavery Women On January 29 1820 M W deBree wrote a letter to her father to tell him some distressing news Her letter detailed a very melancholy circumstance that very nearly occurred on a ship bound from Norfolk Virginia to New Orleans Louisiana Thirty slaves who were passengers on the ship had form d a plot to murder all the passengers and crew except two sailors who were to steer them to St Domingo The Marquis de Lafayette Visits Norfolk and Portsmouth Virginia Date s October 19 1824 to October 27 1824 Location Tag s Arts Leisure Economy Urban Life Boosterism War Although a Frenchmen the Marquis de Lafayette was a man dear to the hearts of many Americans in the early nineteenth century He led American troops into battle during the Revolution had sustained a wound at the Battle of Brandywine and was instrumental in encouraging the participation of the French forces in the siege of Yorktown which led to the surrender of the British in 1781 Lafayette was Steamship Lines of Norfolk Virginia Date s December 11 1823 Location Tag s Agriculture Arts Leisure Economy Migration Transportation The American Beacon and Norfolk and Portsmouth Daily Advertiser of Thursday December 11 1823 contained two advertisements that concerned a new technology that would greatly change the speed with which Americans traveled their vast continent Both advertisements concerned the establishment of steamship lines from Norfolk to important cities in the Chesapeake Bay region The first of the The Portsmouth Fire of 1821 Date

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/14405 (2016-02-15)
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    Health Death Education The Lady of Thebes Mummy was exhibited in Charleston and described in the Charleston Courier on January 31 1824 The mummy was on a tour and had already visited Boston Massachusetts It s coffin was covered in hieroglyphics and it was really a sight to see for the people of Charleston The ancient Egyptian burial rites were a whole different world to the white Christians of South Carolina The The Old Woman Who Sold Ale Date s April 29 1820 Location ARKANSAS Arkansas Tag s Church Religious Activity Women On August 29 1820 the Arkansas Gazette told of an old woman who had dozed off one Sunday in church probably due to the heat and an oppressively long and boring sermon The incident might have gone unnoticed but for her Bible which slipped out of her lap and fell to the floor creating a massive racket Jolted half awake by the noise the elderly lady known to her fellow churchgoers as a seller African American Religious Communities Date s 1875 Location LIBERTY Georgia Tag s African Americans Church Religious Activity Education Race Relations Old Midway Church in Liberty County Georgia served as a place where both whites and blacks came together to worship in antebellum society A Congregational polity its members opposed secession but the rising tensions brought on by the Civil War resulted in the termination of communication between the Church and its fellow congregations in the North During Reconstruction a white Congregational A Change of Churches Date s August 17 1890 Location KING WILLIAM Virginia Tag s African Americans Church Religious Activity For this reason I left you in Crete that you should set in order the things that are lacking and appoint elders in every city as I commanded you Titus 1 5 Reverend

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/14 (2016-02-15)
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    the Choctaw land President Monroe agreed to a cession of about one fifth of the state of Arkansas encompassing sixteen counties In addition to ceding Southwestern Arkansas the US gave up the southern half of Oklahoma parts of the Texan panhandle and into New Mexico Jackson and Hinds made provisions to supply the Choctaw with blankets kettles and enough ammunition for a year in order to help the resettlement In an October 7 Arkansas Gazette article before the treaty was written the author clearly portrayed an attitude of white superiority over the Indians The author painted the picture that the whites were doing the Choctaw a favor by being willing to let the owners of the country sell what they please It is certainly not clear from this biased account that the Choctaw as were most other Indian tribes were actually pressured into the deal and felt as if they had little alternative On December 9 another Gazette report written during the Treaty s proceedings gave the most current information it had Without guaranteeing its accuracy it presented the rumor that the treaty lately concluded with the Choctaws is very unpopular with that nation and that they have openly shown their disapprobation by cutting off the head of their principal Chief who had been instrumental in making the treaty Although the treaty attempted to improve and maintain friendly relations between the Native Americans and the United States which so happily subsists between them and simultaneously aid expansion Arkansans were furious with the decision They were unwilling to lose a large portion of their valuable land and many people vowed to move to Spanish Texas if the treaty was passed However the US government believed they were doing a great service to the Choctaws by promising in article 5 of the

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/1256 (2016-02-15)
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    to the Union as a state on March 2 1819 the federal government authorized a grant for the territory to set aside land for a seminary of learning With the addition of Alabama as a state came a second township of the grant This seminary was officially established by the General Assembly of Alabama on December 18 1820 when Tuscaloosa was the state Cowford Jacksonville Formally Becomes US Territory Date s December 1820 Location INDIAN LANDS Georgia Tag s Agriculture Economy Urban Life Boosterism Following the War of 1812 Isaiah D Hart was living on a farm near the St Mary s River in Florida Learning of the early successes of some small stores opened by white settlers near the Ferry Crossing on the St John s River Hart envisioned great potential for the area Making perhaps the most profitable decision of his life in late 1820 Hart purchased what was then known as Cowford Choctaw Treaty of 1820 Date s October 18 1820 to December 23 1820 Location INDIAN LANDS Mississippi Tag s Migration Transportation Race Relations The United States represented by Generals Andrew Jackson and Thomas Hinds negotiated at Doak s Stand with Mingoes or head men and

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18201018-18201223 (2016-02-15)
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