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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Schools
    1776 1836 2008 08 01 Hist 203 The United States The Nation Divided 1836 1876 2008 12 12 Hist 202 The United States A New Nation 1776 1836 2009 12 11 Hist 341 Sex and Culture in the 19th century United States 2009 12 11 Hist 233 U S Women 1790 1890 2009 12 11 HIST 302 Junior Colloquium Historical Methods 2010 05 15 Hist 233 U S Women 1790

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/schools/view/2 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    her lifeless body Having lived only for her his life without her is bereft of purpose Now he yearns only for death to return forever to the happiness they shared so briefly in this world The rhythm of repeated words and phrases creates a haunting mournful melody that mirrors the speaker s mood Even the poem s meter scholars argue was structured to echo the very ebb and flow of the sea to which the speaker is drawn Again and again in Annabel Lee The Raven Lenore and To Helen Poe returned to what he called the most poetic topic in the world the death of a beautiful woman Indeed love and death drove much of Poe s writing reflecting a life defined by tragedy Abandoned by his father orphaned as an infant he found happiness in his marriage to his young cousin Virginia only to watch her slowly waste away from tuberculosis Annabel Lee written two years after her death was Poe s attempt to give words to the love and sorrow that still consumed him This obsession with death typified Victorian culture which responded to the disease defined realities of the nineteenth century by blending Christian and classical understandings of death They infused death with beauty and redemptive power transforming it into a work of art capable of giving meaning to one s entire life A good death was one in which the individual embraced their own mortality with hope and acceptance Death was spiritualized as focus shifted from the dying decaying body toward the soul Their vision of heaven was of a physical material place a place of natural and artistic beauty where they would be reunited with those they love Heaven was as Mark Schantz argues a tabula rosa upon which Americans could inscribe their most

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5446 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    great strength The card then explained that the bones on the sides and hips and also the sides steels are doubly protected by three or four thicknesses of jean which diminished the likely hood of snapping a steel bone from wear and added much to the durability of the corset From a construction standpoint this corset was solidly built It is no wonder the manufacturer used the nickname of the USS Constitution a ship whose ironsides made of tough oak were said to be impenetrable by cannonballs However four layers of denim over the hips even before the addition of steel bones and cord made moving the hip joints very difficult A woman wearing such a rigid undergarment found even simple tasks much more difficult to complete Household duties such as chasing after children cooking a meal or even tidying the house while wearing a corset made some women begin to wonder if the practice made any positive impact on their lives Middle and upper class women found themselves restricted in many ways during the Victorian era Though Susan B Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton launched the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869 women did not have the right to vote on factors that affected their lives In addition the majority of women did not have jobs outside the home In the home society expected a woman to keep her household running seamlessly However restrictions placed on women branched into other areas beyond social expectations While performing the roles assigned to them by society Victorian fashion expected women to maintain specific hemlines and necklines The clothing that women wore took restriction to another level and the corset led the way The difficulty of performing daily tasks as well as health concerns soon led to the formation of rational dress societies

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4636 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Schools
    Birmingham School Abbreviation UAB Courses Using the History Engine Sort By Department and Section Number End Date HY300 The Historian s Craft 2013 05 15 HY 300 Historians Craft 2009 05 05 HY300 Historian s Craft 2011 05 01 HY300 7T Historian s Craft 2012 06 12 HY300 RF Historian s Craft 2012 08 15 HY300 7T Historian s Craft 2013 05 15 HY300 RF Historian s Craft 2013 08

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/schools/view/10 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    front of the President s box waving a long dagger in his right hand The publishers Barclay and Company of The Terrible Tragedy at Washington Assassination of President Lincoln pamphlet described the scene The President upon being shot told his wife he was dying and bade her good by Dr Charles A Leale was the first doctor to reach the President on the night of April 14 1865 He spent the rest of the night with the President and his family At the theatre Dr Leale proceeded to remove a blood clot from the head wound which helped ease the President s breathing before being taken away to the hospital Nevertheless his condition continued to worsen and all hope began to fade as he was taken away On the morning of Wednesday April 15 1865 the President s condition deteriorated rapidly as a bullet was lodged in his brain As Barclay describes it the bullet was three inches from where it entered the skull He remains insensible and his condition is hopeless According to Barclay during the late hours of the night and into the morning the condition of the President can be described as a state of syncope totally insensible and breathing hardly blood oozing from his wound at the back of his head The Lincoln family remained close by but their reaction was far too sad for description Around 11 A M on the morning of April 15 the President was on his last breath closing his eyes as if falling to sleep and his countenance assuming an expression of perfect serenity His respiration slowly began to cease after his last breath As Barclay mentioned There were no indications of pain A state of shock reverberated throughout the hospital The Reverend D A Gurley of the New York

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5628 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Schools
    and Section Number End Date HS 309 Civil War and Reconstruction 2008 08 01 HS 309 Civil War and Reconstruction 2014 01 01 HS 325 US Since 1945 2009 05 20 HS 309 Civil War and Reconstruction 2010 01 01 HS 325 US Since 1945 2011 05 20 HS 309 Civil War and Reconstruction 2012 01 06 HS 309 Civil War and Reconstruction 2013 01 10 HS 309 Civil War

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/schools/view/3 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    kidnapping the sixteen black occupants Historian Allan Coggins in Tennessee Tragedies shows that some of the prisoners admitted to conspiring to rise up against the whites of Gibson County Coggins also states that the foiled conspiracy was tied to the unrestrained actions of the local KKK Jefferson Davis expressed his disgust at the vigilantism by invoking the Confederate war dead and warned the crowd not to have let them die in vain Speaking of the humanitarian responsibility to oppose such violence Davis alluded that it was what You owe to the gallant dead who fell for the sacred cause of Southern Independence Davis appealed to the honor and reputation of the Southern men and society stating Never has a country been more truly in a condition of having lost all save its honor and you men of the Counties of Jackson Grundy Polk and many others of wide reputation may be expected to denounce whatever would stain the honor and whatever would tarnish the fair name of the living Davis attempted to stop further violence by appealing to the beaten Confederates pride strong even in defeat Only a few years earlier Jefferson Davis was the leader of a rebellion that

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5611 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    general Daniel Sickles was gathering reinforcements and Furman expected an attack any day Responding to the news Furman wrote to Fannie to assure her that he love d her truly and deeply and earnestly with all the warmth of his nature Nonetheless he asked her not to worry insisting that what he truly feared was not an instantaneous death in battle but a long lingering death of disease The former he wrote was like heavy infantry brilliant and rapid but nothing compared to the universally destructive cavalry of disease Ultimately he concluded the slow dead march of camp disease is much more to be dreaded than the rapid double quick of ball and shell In the six months since Furman had enlisted only eight of the regiment s 900 soldiers had died in battle and another 50 had been wounded In those same months measles and typhoid fever swept through the regiment killing 43 and leaving dozens more too weak to fight By winter s end another 20 would be dead of typhoid and pneumonia These losses typify larger patterns of Civil War mortality In the first year of the war as soldiers gathered from across the country measles smallpox and other childhood illnesses devastated newly formed armies Exposure and nutritional deficiencies left soldiers vulnerable to disease and the filthy fetid water that sustained most of their camps allowed dysentery and typhoid to thrive The Civil War recent analysis suggests claimed the lives of upwards of 750 000 Americans An estimated two thirds of those deaths perhaps 500 000 were the result not of battle but disease Historian Allen Guelzo has estimated that disease killed perhaps 18 percent of the entire Confederate army and James McPherson argues that the percentage may be even higher It is little wonder then that

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5443 (2016-02-15)
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