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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Join
    know your interest by contacting us through the form below Once we know you re interested we ll send you an authentication code that allows you to register for the site This code protects the site from unauthorized users and helps to maintain the academic integrity of the project When you receive your authentication code enter it on the Registration page of the History Engine Your name Your email address

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/about/join (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    The History Engine Toggle navigation The History Engine Basic Search Search Explore Students Teachers About Contact Log In Basic Search Search Digital Scholarship Lab 2008 2015 The University of Richmond

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/basic (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Research
    you may only make it through two or three collections over the course of a few hours Remember that you can always request more later on Once I have the document what should I write down Start by writing the full citation of the document at the top of the page including the call number which will be important if you need to look at the document again Refer to the Citation Guide for the information you will need Read the whole source through once to get a sense of what the document is about This is also a good time to determine if the document will be useful for your project If you are looking at a handwritten document such as a letter or diary episode some of the text may be difficult to decipher Don t panic If the whole manuscript is illegible you may want to move on to the next document If you can make out most of the words try to figure out others by comparing individual letters in the words you can read As a last resort ask an archivist or librarian if he or she can help Next write a two sentence summary of the primary document underneath the citation This summary should be an overview of what the document is about For example a summary might read Telegram from New York Governor Edwin D Morgan to President Abraham Lincoln Albany July 14 1862 Morgan tells Lincoln that Congress should not adjourn without providing for a draft law to fill up the army You may be submitting each summary to your instructor so use complete sentences and proper grammar Finally if the document seems like a promising candidate for your episode take more detailed notes on its contents Depending upon the type of document you are looking at eg an advertisement vs a five page letter your notes could take up several pages or only a few more sentences than the summary Be sure to write down the names and places mentioned When in doubt take down more information since it may be difficult to return to the archive Okay I have the primaries down now what about secondary sources Before you begin searching for secondary sources decide what the theme of each episode will be This may be more difficult than it sounds a long letter from a mother to her daughter in South Carolina in 1862 might include a discussion of the progress of the Civil War the family farm her financial situation and a sick aunt all in its first few pages Pick out the focus of the letter What is the reason for writing What is motivating the mother If you can t determine the focus pick out the topic that interests you the most Your secondary source should be a book or an article on the subject of your episode s theme Take the 1862 mother daughter letter for example Let s say you pick out Civil War

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/students/research (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Writing
    books and articles help you fill in missing information from the primary source For example let s say your primary source is an October 1840 letter from an Illinois corn farmer to his father Among other issues the farmer talked with his father about the upcoming presidential election and his enthusiasm for the Whig candidates Tippecanoe and Tyler Too A secondary source can explain that the campaign slogan Tippecanoe and Tyler Too stood for William Henry Harrison of Ohio who d been dubbed Tippecanoe for his success in the battle of the same name and John Tyler of Virginia A second role for your secondary source is to provide the context for your primary source A book or article on the election of 1840 could tell you that Whigs Harrison and Tyler defeated Democrat Martin Van Buren the incumbent in the November election by an overwhelming majority Finally the most important role for your secondary source is to explain the significance of your primary document to larger historical themes In this case a secondary source would help you to explain that farmers in Illinois which had typically been a Democratic state and others throughout the Midwest helped to elect the first Whig president in history Writing tips for the secondary source Make a smooth transition from primary to secondary Don t write the letter is significant because Instead try was like many Illinois farmers in 1840 who helped elect the first Whig president Only spend a few sentences on your secondary source unless you need a lot of clarification the focus should be your primary source Always give appropriate credit to your source If you quote the author or closely paraphrase be sure to include his or her name in the text For example as Whig historian Michael Holt writes or according to Whig historian Michael Holt Don t just tack on your secondary source at the bottom Weave it into the second half of your text but always come back to your story and primary source at the end of the episode Don t put the citation information even the page number in the body of your episode You can put the page numbers in the citation at the end Are there any other writing rules for these episodes One way in which episodes are like term papers is that they should be written with proper grammar sentence structure spelling and punctuation Follow the basic rules of format like indenting each paragraph In addition to basic style rules follow the rules on the Style Guide for formatting and spelling Your episode should not have any Style Guide errors What other information do I need for my finished episodes You should determine a title start and end date location and set of tags that apply to each episode in addition to your primary and secondary source citations before turning your final product into your instructor Be sure to check out the database to get a sense of the standard episode

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/students/writing (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Quick Guide
    citations of individual quotes or facts You have to write in such a way that the source of quotations is obvious e g The imminent historian of colonial firewood Dave Hsiung said fire wood helps you to stay warm The bibliography takes Chicago style and should be submitted as a list Titles Titles should be pretty specific and probably should contain a suggestion of the action i e a verb Do not write titles that try to be the last word on an event e g not The Battle of Gettysburg but A Pennsylvania private fights at Little Round Top This leaves room for many perspectives on an event Tags A tag is an identifying handle or keyword a way of categorizing the content of each episode These tags are essential to making episodes easily accessible and searchable on the History Engine website Each episode should have at least two tags There are a number of available tags in the database already but you may create your own tags if you think those are insufficient Some examples of tags include African Americans Agriculture Arts Leisure Church Religious Activity Law Crime Violence Diplomacy International Economy Education Government Health Death Migration Transportation

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/teachers/quick_guide (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Style Guide
    bigger picture of history If you must begin with brief context get to the story as soon as possible Style Guide Acronyms always spell out acronyms on first mention American Baptist Home Mission Society ABHMS African American do not hyphenate You can use African American interchangeably with black but you should not use the terms Negro or Colored unless they are contained in a quote Assumed Knowledge be careful of assumed knowledge in your descriptions Do not assume that when you refer to items the first time the reader knows what it is On first mention use the whole description For example the battle the act the president and the war should be the Battle of Bull Run the Fugitive Slave Act President Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War Centuries write out centuries nineteenth century or the twentieth century Hyphenate when used as an adjective nineteenth century books or twentieth century morals Commas use in introductory phrases Before the war the South in a series of three or more I want an apple a banana and an orange in compound sentences The North won the war and the South did not recover for years and generally use the comma to make your episode easier to read Contractions do not use contractions don t won t shouldn t in your episodes unless they are part of a quote Dates write specific dates as January 3 1861 so the sentence looks like On January 3 1861 President Abraham Lincoln OR President Lincoln signed the bill on January 3 1861 Do not use January 3rd 1861 Descriptions the body of your episode should stand alone The reader should not have to refer to the label title or the dates to understand your episode For example if the label title is The Homestead Act

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/students/style_guide (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Citation Guide
    20 Pt 1 21 Dec 1888 pp 433 434 X 279 Alderman Library University of Virginia Message of President on rewards offered for arrest of assassins of Abraham Lincoln House Ex Doc 63 39 1 Washington D C Government Printing Office 1866 Serial Set 1332 Alderman Library University of Virginia Broadside Democratic ticket our principles the constitution Broadside 1860 D457 Special Collections Library University of Virginia Pamphlet or other printed material Townsend John The doom of slavery in the Union its safety out of it Charleston S C Printed by Evans Cogwell 1860 E449 T74 1860 Special Collections Library University of Virginia Records of Southern Plantations on microfilm George Shelby to Emily Shelby September 20 1831 Shelby Papers reel 1 Micflm 1705 ser B Frame 00123 Alderman Library University of Virginia Manuscript collection Mss 640 etc Cocke Family Papers Box 151 Note sheet for inventories Special Collections University of Virginia Primary source in a secondary source Lydia Child to Convers Francis July 14 1848 in Letters of Lydia Maria Child New York 1969 65 CITING SECONDARY SOURCES All your citations for secondary sources should follow the Chicago Manual of Style Here are some examples of common formats for common citations using the Chicago guide Book Howard K Jones The South Boston Freedom Publishing 1995 5 13 Article Bartholomew Kelley The Slave Experience in Georgia Historical South Magazine 5 1984 57 60 Chapter Essay in Book Carol Reardon A Hard Road to Travel The Impact of Continuous Operations on the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia in May 1864 The Spotsylvania Campaign ed Gary W Gallagher Chapel Hill The University of North Carolina Press 1998 177 Website History Museum of Florida The Architecture of a Typical Floridian Plantation History Museum of Florida http www floridahistorymuseum com accessed

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/students/citation_guide (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Guide
    from 1810 1900 or as narrow as Agriculture in Pennsylvania from 1810 1861 It is particularly useful to consider what resources are either on hand at your university s library or in nearby public libraries or archives You may want to tailor the assignment to promote local resources as students most enjoy the experience of handling primary documents Teaching the project Part III Student Research and Writing lays out exactly how instructors may present the project and proceed through the research and writing process You may also want to determine if creating the database will be the terminal project or if you will want students to do an additional project that uses the completed database Suggestions for additional projects can be found in Part IV Using the Final Product 4 What will students have to do for the project Direct students to the website Step by step instructions for students detailing the research and writing process are on the History Engine website Student goals In brief students will be responsible for two main contributions to the database Episodes that convey historical moments using both primary and secondary sources Bibliographical information on each primary and secondary source used Student requirements Students should refer to the Style Guide and Citation Guide to be sure they are using the proper structural and grammatical format for the database 5 What do I do if I have a problem with the website Contact us Please feel free to use the contact us form to submit any questions regarding the Teacher s Guide or History Engine II Getting Started This section outlines how to register for the History Engine online set goals for your project incorporate available resources into project design work with librarians and archivists construct the student assignments and build the project into a class syllabus Website Planning and Registration Contact us Before you can register for the History Engine project you must receive an authentication code This code protects the site from unauthorized users and helps to maintain the academic integrity of the project To get a code please contact us Registering Enter your authentication code on the Registration page of the History Engine to access the Registration form Once you submit your class information the website will generate a unique class code that is assigned to your individual course this code will also be emailed to you Save your class code to give to students when they are ready to upload their episodes This code will allow you to monitor their progress and also protect the site from unauthorized users Knowing the project The most important preparation you can do is to familiarize yourself with the project as a whole You will likely want to read through the entire Teacher s Guide before planning your syllabus Make sure you know what an episode is and can easily describe it to your students Planning Now you are ready to plan your course You may want to explore the History Engine website to help make decisions about your goals and syllabus discussed in the sections below Setting Your Goals Time frame Decide how much of your course you intend to devote to the History Engine The research assignment generally takes at least four weeks for even one or two episodes so if you only have a couple of weeks consider skipping to Part IV Using the Final Product To use the History Engine as the central focus of the course be sure to allot at least eight to ten weeks for up to six episodes Course parameters The History Engine assignments can be tailored to any course from broad surveys like Nineteenth Century United States History to more specific topics such as New York Women in 1925 For a more specific assignment be sure your library or local archive has enough resources for all of your students Research goals Student research for History Engine episodes can be as specific or open ended as you would like Students can focus on one particular collection of documents such as slave narratives or the Abraham Lincoln papers or you may require them to investigate a broad range of documents including a different collection for each episode Librarians are often helpful in determining how much student research is possible in a limited amount of time Collaboration College instructors from around the country use the History Engine in their classrooms If you intend to make the History Engine the focal point of your syllabus consider enlisting one or more of these fellow teachers in a cross institution collaborative final project Together you might require each student to submit one episode on a particular subject such as the New Deal or time period such as May 1876 The result of this uniform assignment will be a plethora of episodes on the same subject or time period based on primary documents from different archives across the United States A final paper that explores the chosen subject or time period will give students a new perspective on how scholars construct a narrative based on available sources Knowing Your Resources Taking an inventory The key to making the History Engine successful is readily available and varied primary sources Students often appreciate the possibility of looking through a large number of documents and selecting the ones they like best Before constructing the specifics of your assignment you may want to compile a broad list of primary sources available in your own library and in nearby repositories Using your libraries If asked well in advance librarians may be willing to provide lists for you for more specifics for how to enlist the help of librarians for the History Engine project see Working With Libraries and Librarians below Using local archives Local museums and archives can be an untapped resource for student projects Local archivists and librarians may be willing to provide you with a list of primary sources available in their repository for your specified time period and region As part of the project you may require students to use the resources in local repositories that are easily accessible You may want to speak with the archivists before requiring students to go outside the college however as a large group of student visitors may disrupt other researchers Other colleges universities Some schools located nearby may be willing to grant your students temporary access to primary documents with advance notice Working With Libraries and Librarians Working with librarians Enlisting the help of librarians and archivists for the research portion of the project is highly recommended Librarians at your college local libraries and nearby archives contribute to the project in three main ways they will help you tailor the project to your class based on the resources available train students in research techniques and direct students to proper resources enhancing the overall quality of episodes Throughout the research process librarians serve as a secondary check to the integrity of student research How will I convince librarians to help my class The History Engine is a resource librarians will love You can get librarians and archivists on board by familiarizing them with the website and the project Present the History Engine as a learning tool that taps into the emerging field of digital history Explain that students will not only be required to use library resources such as rare documents microform and ILL but they also will experience research in a new and exciting way Most librarians will jump at the chance to help student research and will gladly participate in a class activity that encourages students to delve into library resources The History Engine uniquely allows instructors librarians and students to be part of an educational team To help summarize the project for librarians you can provide them the Librarian Guide Resources on reserve You may want to arrange with librarians to set aside major document collections or generally useful secondary sources That way you know there is a base of resources available that you trust as accurate However you will want to balance reserve materials with allowing students to experience the thrill of library archive exploration You should be sure to discuss with librarians the dates that students will be conducting research over the course of the semester so as not to overburden the library Presentations If you contact them early enough librarians may also be willing to become more involved in the project process Inviting library staff to do a presentation for your class on how use the library and or research in archives can really benefit those students who are unfamiliar with library etiquette or where to begin researching when they enter a library It is important to schedule the presentation BEFORE students begin researching Keep them in the loop Keep librarians informed of all the research dates for the project so they know when to look for students in need Don t forget to share the finished products with librarians who have been generous enough to help out on the project Constructing the Student Assignments Assignment parameters After reviewing your resources decide what the focus of your History Engine assignment will be If you do not have an assignment in mind before planning your syllabus you might find it easiest to tailor the parameters to the available sources in your area For example if your class is on the twentieth century American South and your library has a wealth of resources about the civil rights movement you may want to focus the assignment on this subject Or if your class is United States History to 1900 and your libraries house large numbers of documents about Tennessee students could research how that state fit into the larger story of nineteenth century America If you do have an assignment in mind be sure there are enough primary sources for each student You may also want to alter the number of episodes based on your resources Group assignments One effective way to facilitate student collaboration and discussion is to create a History Engine assignment for your syllabus that can be split up among several student groups For instance you might divide your class into groups based on which location they will research the database supports divisions down to the county level time period they will investigate the subject matter of their episodes the library collection they will look through or any combination of these Previous instructors have split students into counties such as Albemarle County Virginia Prince Edward County Virginia etc as well as time periods such as the 1820s 1830s and 1840s There are several benefits to these small groups First students in each group serve as a support network during the primary and secondary research phases of the assignment Students in small groups often pool their knowledge of secondary sources for example Second the small groups serve as ready made peer editing communities when students reach the writing phase of the assignment Finally working with a small group will allow students to take interest in the work of their peers from the research phase through the uploading phase Small group work is not required for the History Engine project but it can greatly enhance the quality of your students work Individual assignments To facilitate a wide array of episodes you may also decide to give students individual assignments within their group In the counties example the nine students in the Albemarle County group were split into 1810s 1820s 1830s etc Alternatively groups built around time 1810s 1820s 1830s etc can be split into location state county etc or subject matter Even if you choose to give individual assignments students may work with their group and are encouraged to do so to find useful secondary sources about their region time period subject and source type or trade ideas about primary sources Your role Decide how much you want to provide for students and how much you want them to find on their own For example you may want to provide them with a list of useful secondary sources or a list of library collections You may also want to schedule extra office hours for students who need guidance finding the right kinds of sources Building Your Syllabus also see Part III Student Research and Writing Introduction Give your students some time to become acquainted with the site A week to look through existing episodes pick out previously used primary sources and read through the Students section of the website will give them a head start on understanding the History Engine project You may also want to assign a short paper based on episodes already in the database so that students can familiarize themselves with the types of entries they will create over the course of the term Primary sources Be sure to budget ample time for primary source research For a five to six episode assignment you may want to budget at least two weeks for students to find appropriate sources and turn in a list of primary documents with short descriptions and another week to correct any mistakes or revise their list Instructors may want to set incremental due dates for research as it is imperative that students begin researching early For example if you have a three episode assignment you might require students to turn in a list of primary documents they have looked at or an annotated bibliography of sources See the teacher resources in the sidebar for a sample annotated bibliography assignment used at the University of Virginia in 2007 Secondary sources Students often find secondary sources the most difficult part of the assignment For a large number of episodes it may take two weeks for students to find the appropriate sources Rough drafts Once students have both their primary and secondary sources they should begin writing their episodes Episodes should be approximately 250 500 words should focus primarily on the primary source and should be written in narrative form You can allot anywhere from one to two weeks to write the rough drafts but be sure to budget enough time to read them six episodes for fifty students can add up You might consider beginning with peer review to catch Style Guide errors and factual mistakes Final drafts Be sure episodes are polished and ready to upload on the website Submitted final drafts should include titles date location tags etc Uploading The Edit Episode page requires login gives step by step directions for uploading Students can cut and paste from their word processor directly onto the website Using the uploaded episodes Students often benefit from using their classmates work in a new assignment Consider asking students to complete a final paper based on the work of your class See Part IV Using the Final Product for sample papers and projects that familiarize students with their classmates hard work III Student Research and Writing This section is designed to help you lead your students through the classroom experience including introducing them to the project supervising their research efforts and working through drafts Introducing the Project Acting as historians Explain to students that they will learn to act as historians during the course of the project They will be expected to investigate primary sources and interpret them using secondary sources Defining the project Refer to I Introduction for an explanation of episodes and the History Engine If a projector is available instructors may want to walk students through the website in class Primary v Secondary sources Many students are unfamiliar with these terms Instructors may want to define and model how to use these sources Setting goals Explain the aims of the project refer to What is the History Engine and I Introduction Emphasize that the project is a collaborative effort by the class to create an excellent resource for public use While much of the work is done individually the end product reflects the efforts of everyone Suggested assignment Have students investigate the History Engine website and select a favorite episode to bring to class to discuss in groups or as a class This activity can help familiarize students with the concept of a successful episode Suggested assignment Ask students to write a short paper on a subject of their choice or yours using only the episodes in the History Engine For reference see an example of this assignment used at the University of Virginia in 2007 Supervising Research Using academic libraries Many students will be unfamiliar with their campus libraries and may benefit from a presentation by the library staff Instructors or librarians might walk students through such library services as Interlibrary Loan and such resources as microfilm Special collections libraries In particular using libraries that contain actual primary documents are the most rewarding for students Familiarize students with the etiquette of your library and inform them of any materials on reserve for your class Highly recommended assignment Two sentence description of each primary document listing what the document is and its contents Instructors will want to OK these primary materials before students continue on to the writing process Breaking up the researching time will also prevent students from trying to complete full episodes at the last minute Suggested assignments Early on in the process students may want to orient themselves in their locations and time periods using encyclopedias or timelines Instructors may even choose to have students submit a timeline or brief overview of their place and time Instructors may also choose to OK secondary materials In that case consider having students turn in a bibliography Supervising Writing Using the website Before constructing their episodes students will want to familiarize themselves with the basic Do s and Don ts of episode writing The Writing section provides students with step by step directions You may also want to print out a copy of Tuten s Quick Guide to Writing This guide gives a concise checklist for writing complete and successful History Engine episodes Style and content It is important to reemphasize that an episode pinpoints a story in American history

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/pages/teachers/guide (2016-02-15)
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