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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Courses
    Kate Stone recorded her thoughts about the news of Abraham Lincoln s death She wrote All honor to J Wilkes Booth who has rid the world of a tyrant and made himself famous for generations She also mentions John H Surratt in her praises for daring an attack on the Secretary of State William H Seward a well know abolitionist Later she discovered it was Louis Powell friend Blacks Massacred In Memphis Riots Date s May 1 1866 to May 3 1866 Location Tag s African Americans Crime Violence Race Relations Urban Life Boosterism Deep seated racial tensions exploded in Memphis on May 1 1866 For three days violence ruled the city as roaming mobs murdered robbed and burned throughout the Black Quarter By the time Federal troops imposed martial law on May 3 ending the riots Memphis terrorized black community was in shambles Roughly fifty blacks were murdered outright and scores more were wounded Burned to the ground Federal Troops Take Refuge In Fort Sumter Date s December 26 1860 Location Tag s Government Politics War At noon on December 26 1860 two cannon shots sounded throughout Charleston Harbor Six days earlier the state of South Carolina seceded from the Union The gun shots were a pre arranged signal for the federal troops stationed in Fort Moultrie on Sullivan s Island located a few miles from Charleston Under the command of Major Robert Anderson the troops heard the signal and began to evacuate Furman Promises Appropriate Education for Women Date s August 1850 Location Tag s Arts Leisure Church Religious Activity Education Women Reverend James C Furman delivered a speech for opening convocation on the anniversary of Johnson Female Seminary in August of 1850 He addressed the crowd of students with the words women s sphere lies within the

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/courses/view/5/5 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    convent from their previous location in the middle of the French Quarter they had been an important presence in the city of New Orleans for almost a century They arrived from France in 1727 to establish a school for girls in what was then a French colony They provided an education not only for white girls of the colony but also for slaves free girls of color and Native American girls In addition the Ursulines ran an orphanage and a hospital In the years immediately following the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 the Ursuline nuns experienced several conflicts with both federal and city officials One such conflict with the United States government concerning property ownership within the city led the nuns to purchase property two miles outside New Orleans with the idea of moving In 1819 the nuns experienced a different conflict as New Orleans expanded a closed off street going right through the convent compound had become an inconvenience to the public In response city officials decided to open this street to the public despite protests from the Ursulines This decision was what drove the nuns to sell some of their city property and to construct a new convent outside the city The new location gave the nuns the ability to expand as well as the advantage of both being outside the jurisdiction of city officials and of being out of the way of city development The convent cost 83 172 to build and the chapel was an additional 23 635 a total equivalent to about 2 million today Emily Clark argues that by spending this much money to build an extravagant convent the Ursuline nuns were making a statement as self governing Catholic women in a Protestant country that valued a woman s submission to the authority of a

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4424 (2016-02-15)
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    Tennessee Tag s Arts Leisure Education Urban Life Boosterism There was a buzz around town about free education on Sundays Sunday School proved to be popular because it was beneficial for all sects and denominations The advertisement posted in the Independent Gazette informed readers that school would be offered on Sundays free of charge According to the advertisement the school will be opened under the direction of the Board of Managers for the By law Implemented for Gun Control Date s March 25 1824 to March 26 1824 Location ANNE ARUNDEL Maryland Tag s Crime Violence Law Slavery The Mayor and Common Council of Annapolis declared a by law to prevent the firing of guns within the city limits The Mayor first informed the citizens of Annapolis on the by law in an article published in the local paper The Maryland Gazette on March 25 1824 The article permitted a week long period of time for news of the by law to reach the people of Annapolis before the Common Council The Mississippi in Flood Date s July 2 1823 Location OUACHITA Louisiana Tag s Agriculture Economy Financial ruin courted the planters of Ouachita and Concordia Parishes in a taunting dance of destruction in the summer of 1823 The Mississippi River so vital to the economic profit of the sugar and cotton plantations along its banks flooded and overflowed the fields of both parishes Whole crops were ruined According to B Levy Company s Price Current published in the Baltimore Patriot Keeping it in the Family Slave Inheritance Date s 1823 Location BRUNSWICK Virginia Tag s Economy Slavery With the exception of slaves with certain bargains William Gilliam willed all slaves land and stock to John William Gilliam around 1823 It was important to William Gilliam that his estate stock

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18230325-18240901 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    after growing into one of the most popular personas in America in his day and age James Hewitt 1770 1827 a local composer that left England as a young man to begin his own American dream in Ursuline Nuns Relocate their Convent outside the City of New Orleans Date s March 25 1823 to September 1 1824 Location Tag s Church Religious Activity Women Migration Transportation Urban Life Boosterism African

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/5595 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    doctors including Christian Miltenberger While during his time in St Domingue serving as a surgeon for a British garrison Miltenberger treated many cases of yellow fever and was well equipped to handle the outbreaks in New Orleans With his experience in dealing with yellow fever the Mayor of New Orleans saw great potential in Miltenberger and appointed him to supervise indigent health care for the Mayor s district Miltenberger also had the opportunity to present a paper before the Medical Society of New Orleans in 1819 theorizing that yellow fever was not a contagious disease thus changing the understanding and reaction to the outbreaks of yellow fever With this great influence on the medical community came great reputation for Miltenberger He was an active mason and served as president of a commission to raise funds for the construction of a Masonic hospital in the city of New Orleans Miltenberger also acted on an opportunity to merge 120 acres of his property with 320 acres owned by Madame Joseph Bayle creating a rather large sugar plantation just outside of New Orleans After buying her out three years later Miltenberger became one of the wealthiest men in New Orleans and by far the most reputable St Domingan refugee in New Orleans As a gift to his wife Miltenberger had three row houses built at 900 Royal Street in 1838 The intricate delicacy of the lacy cast iron galleries covering the sidewalks the slender iron columns supporting the second story gallery the narrow frieze of rococo iron leaves set below the floor of the gallery and the four floor to ceiling windows are just a few of the design techniques that make the Miltenberger House unique to the French Quarter The Miltenberger home has remained untouched by the social changes of New Orleans

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4423 (2016-02-15)
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    Milledgeville Georgia Jonathan R Davis of Gadsden South Carolina had to do some calculations While planning for his trip he took out his 1838 edition of Mitchell s Traveller s Guide through the United States The brown three by five inch book contained the mileage for all common stagecoach routes in the country as well as information on the few established Yellow Fever Responsible for Christian Miltenberger s Success in 19th Century New Orleans Date s 1838 Location ORLEANS Louisiana Tag s Health Death Migration Transportation Urban Life Boosterism Situated at the intersection of Royal and Dumaine Street in the heart of the New Orleans the Miltenberger House still stands as a testimony to one immigrant s accumulation of wealth and to medical advancements in the South during the 19th century Little was known about yellow fever especially ways to prevent or treat this disease Almost annually it seemed the Gulf Coast and in A Murder Trial in the Greenville Mountaineer Date s 1838 to 1839 Location GREENVILLE South Carolina Tag s Greenville Mountaineer Earle Yancey Murder Greenville SC On November 9 1838 the Greenville Mountaineer reported on a murder trial against none other than its own editor mister William Lowndes Yancey Yancey shot and killed his wife s uncle Dr Robinson Earle on South Main Street in broad daylight in September 1838 The Yancey family was well known in the Greenville area in the 1820s as was the Earle family which caused this trial to become Mapping a Crime Scene in Greenville South Carolina Date s 1838 Location GREENVILLE South Carolina Tag s Greenville SC Yancey Earle Murder Mansion Hotel Crittenden Writer of the Greenville Century Book S S Crittenden has personal ties to that fateful day in November 1838 when newspaper editor William Lowndes Yancey shot his wife

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18380101-18381231 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    s Town Home gentrification Urban Life Boosterism Architecture Arts Leisure The thirteen sisters of Julia Street started a new trend These sisters were a row of thirteen side hall style town houses that spanned the 600 block of Julia Street in New Orleans Upon their construction by the New Orleans Building Company in 1833 they were among first rows constructed in the side hall or London plan manner most commonly seen in Philadelphia and Baltimore The exteriors Influence of Greek Revival Architecture Date s 1834 Location Tag s Architecture Greek Revival The Greek Revival sprung into the American architectural landscape just as quickly as it disappeared lasting only from the 1820s to 1850s A typical result from the movement was a James Gallier product that was part of the Three Sisters and constructed on Rampart Street in New Orleans in conjunction with two other Greek Revival town homes Originally built in 1834 as a residential structure Yellow Fever Responsible for Christian Miltenberger s Success in 19th Century New Orleans Date s 1838 Location Tag s Health Death Migration Transportation Urban Life Boosterism Situated at the intersection of Royal and Dumaine Street in the heart of the New Orleans the Miltenberger House still stands as a testimony to one immigrant s accumulation of wealth and to medical advancements in the South during the 19th century Little was known about yellow fever especially ways to prevent or treat this disease Almost annually it seemed the Gulf Coast and in particular Slaves and Their Religion Date s 1826 to 1842 Location Tag s African Americans Church Religious Activity Race Relations Slavery By 1834 Black churches had begun to exist in various parts of the United States In this year the First African Church of New Orleans which had been officially founded in October

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/5596 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    together and make changes mainly because of a lack of numbers and because the rural women were too busy working their land and trying to make a living In the city during the war women held jobs that men left behind when they went to fight When male soldiers returned women had to return to their predominately domestic lives Northern troops began to occupy southern cities in order to make sure that they were reconstructing and not re enslaving the people the north had worked so hard to free Because only men served as soldiers during the war women looked for ways to display their patriotism and support for the southern states in alternative manners Southern women in a way had more power than northern women because they still had a cause that they felt they had to depend even though the war was lost In April of 1862 Major General Benjamin F Butler and his troops were in charge of the occupation of New Orleans Butler describes in his autobiography that the men of the city of New Orleans did not interfere with the soldiers in any way However whenever women of the city would come into contact with any of these Yankee soldiers they would shoot them hateful glances make derisive comments and flee the area In the minds of these women they were fulfilling the patriotic duties that they were denied when they were not able to serve as soldiers The women were hoping that their mistreatment of these soldiers would force the soldiers to retaliate and therefore give the city of New Orleans a solid argument for expelling them Soldiers were hesitant to arrest the young women in the street causing the ruckus due to they fact that they were typically high class women and a

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4425 (2016-02-15)
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