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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    into three divisions giving command of one division to Hill Earlier in the Civil War Hill received much criticism from other Confederate leaders for his tendency towards tardiness and subsequent high volume of stragglers during his marches when he raced to compensate He felt this battle was his chance to prove his competence and military skill once and for all On the first day of battle Hill led his men in a march towards the town of Gettysburg Along the way they encountered Federal troops assumed to be cavalry Not until it was too late did Hill and his soldiers realize these troops were a veteran Union force that was able to dispute the further advance of the Confederates Hill noted in his report the want of cavalry had been and was again seriously felt but his troops were able to halt the enemies move through the town At this point Hill felt it prudent to cease fighting for the day and allow his men to rest As he had long been criticized for not allowing his men mandatory rest breaks this was a deliberate gesture on Hill s part The next day fighting resumed and Hill described the incredible resistance of the Union forces He also commented on the inability of his troops guided by many able subordinates to breach the line Hill stated in his battle report that his men started day three in the same position they had started day two However historians agree that Hill s battle report leaves much to be desired in the way of clear explanations of action Some suggest his ailing health left him unable to take charge of his men and led him to spend much of his time in the company of General Lee instead of with his troops There

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5183 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    Hill in the Battle of Gettysburg Date s July 1 1863 to July 3 1863 Location ADAMS Pennsylvania Tag s Pickett s Charge Civil War Gettysburg General Ambrose Powell Hill viewed Gettysburg as his chance for redemption from a reputation as a cantankerous argumentative and tardy leader in the Confederate Army but the ill fate that befell his troops in the battle was not the ending he desired It was

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/920 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    Historian Charles Stewart attributes this to the fact that Willich was thoroughly a Democrat and simply a solider In one sentence there appears to be no better way to describe Willich Unlike most of his superiors Willich had extensive military experience From the age of twelve he began his military training Additionally he was a veteran of several European Wars He was in his fifties at the outbreak of the Civil War and had more experience in battle than many of his superiors combined but yet he enlisted as a private Additionally Willich implemented the ill received Prussian tactic of the three lined advanced firing and often coordinated his advances with bugle calls Union commanders and other officers did not accept these innovations The rejection of Willich s tactics was not because they were ill founded but rather a rejection of Willich s politics In Willich s official report after the battle of Chickamauga one can see through his rhetoric and the references that he made that he was not an ordinary general In a tactical manner Willich outlined and summarized major troop movements and turning points during the battle On one hand Willich did not use his report as a vehicle to justify or explain his defeat On the other hand he did specifically highlight the actions of his all German regiment because of his determination to prove what a patriotic German can do For example after Chickamauga Willich described his 32nd Indiana regiment as again and again proven that they are true sons of the Republic who value life only so long as it is the life of a freeman so that they may make every power slaveratic or monarchial bend before the commonwealth of the freeman of the United States of America Willich s report clearly represented

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5184 (2016-02-15)
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    health services Saint Elizabeth s Hospital was built by the United States Congress as a result of the Civil and Diplomatic Appropriation Act of 1852 The Institution opened in Washington DC in 1855 as the Government Hospital for the Insane A prominent leader in the mental health field Dorthea Dix lobbied for the construction of the facility and founded Winter Park Amtrak Station Date s 1962 Location Orange Florida Tag s Winter Park Florida Amtrak The Winter Park train station has existed almost as long as Rollins College has Students have traveled in and out of Winter Park on trains that stop at the station Before flying became popular the train was the only practical way to go home or to travel anywhere In this article Rollins College attempted to use the train as a strategy to attract alumni to Winter Park for the 100 th An African American Worker at Sloss Furnace Encounters the Color Line Date s 1925 to 1950 Location Jefferson Alabama Tag s Iron and Steel Industry Economy Race Relations African Americans A nigger can t bid for a white man s job was how Alonzo Gaines described labor divisions among African Americans and whites at the time he was employed at Sloss Furnaces in Birmingham Alabama In 1984 Gaines sat down in an interview with the Sloss Furnace Association with the goal of recording his thoughts on his career at Sloss Furnaces a pig iron producing blast furnace in Birmingham Alabama In Distress Not Despair Date s 1940 to 1955 Location Wayne Michigan Tag s Mayor Jeffries Black Bottom Detroit Urban Renewal Slum Clearance I 75 Lafayette Park WWII After World War II in 1943 the city of Detroit had trouble dealing with the huge influx of people moving to Detroit to find factory jobs

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/19630901 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Georgia August Willich No Ordinary General Date s September 1 1963 Location Tag s August Willich 32nd Indiana Regiment The Battle of Chickamauga All men may be created equal but they are remembered differently In contrast to Robert E Lee and Stonewall Jackson August Willich was not a celebrity of the Civil War He was a Prussian political refugee and an aristocrat with an unapologetic communistic political leaning Willch s

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/32907 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    By Relevance Chronology August Willich No Ordinary General Date s September 1 1963 Location Walker Georgia Tag s August Willich 32nd Indiana Regiment The Battle of Chickamauga All men may be created equal but they are remembered differently In contrast to Robert E Lee and Stonewall Jackson August Willich was not a celebrity of the Civil War He was a Prussian political refugee and an aristocrat with an unapologetic communistic

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/921 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    Willich was not a celebrity of the Civil War He was a Prussian political refugee and an aristocrat with an unapologetic communistic political leaning Willch s communistic nature generated his pre war nickname Reddest of the Red Yet his tremendous contributions Sherman Praises Soldiers of the Fifth Divison Date s April 6 1862 to April 7 1862 Location HARDIN Tennessee Tag s 32nd Indiana Regiment The Battle of Shiloh During

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/101 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    in Hazen s Brigade After attracting the attention of his superiors Bierce was promoted in April of 1863 to Hazen s acting topographical officer his commander s personal map maker who became his eyes prior to battle writes David Owens This role of topographical officer was at the center stage of any officer corps but was often overlooked Chickamauga was his first major battle with his new title His new role required him to be very familiar with the battlefield terrain and this familiarity made Bierce s memoir significant as it provided him a larger view of battle as he roamed on horseback was in constant contact with high level officers and was directly involved in strategic high ranking military planning Moving from infantryman to staff officer greatly expanded his view of the war and this would be reflected in his later writings His memoir Chickamauga told the story of this battle through a highly emotional and graphic lens It was written in 1889 for the San Francisco Examiner where he could write without fear of editorial constraints In this intense short story a little boy found himself lost in the woods among wounded men crawling to a creek He innocently went among them looked into their faces and tried to play with them Bierce wrote But on and ever one they crept these maimed and bleeding men as heedless as he of the dramatic contrast between his laughter and their own ghastly gravity He made his way back home to found it on fire and his mother dead This loss of the child s innocence to the brutality of war was perhaps a reflection of the loss of innocence throughout the United States as people at home and on the battlefield experienced this horrific war Bierce s role as

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5185 (2016-02-15)
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