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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    Tag s War literature Bierce writes They were men They crept upon their hands and knees They used their hands only dragging their legs They used their knees only their arms hanging idle at their sides They strove to rise to their feet but fell prone in the attempt Through chilling words Ambrose Bierce illustrated the battlefield at Chickamauga in his short story Chickamauga Bierce a writer and soldier Do You Hate Me Date s 1802 to 1825 Location Norfolk Massachusetts Tag s Writing literature Civil Rights Native American issues Historiography A four year old boy cries aloud as his grandmother continuously beats him with a club repeatedly demanding of him do you hate me Young William Apess ignorant of his grandmother s meaning knows only to answer in the affirmative hoping to appease her every wish The life of this little boy would have ended at that very moment had his uncle not intervened to rescue him from the brutal Melville creates a literary Pickett s charge Date s July 3 1863 Location ADAMS Pennsylvania Tag s Civil War literature In his poem Gettysburg written in 1866 Herman Melville renowned writer and poet of the 19th century who did

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/177 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    2 The fact that the commander of the Union army missed an entire day of fighting shows that the Battle of Gettysburg was a spontaneous incidental battle Upon his arrival Meade immediately began distributing his army along the fish hook shaped Union line in anticipation of a Confederate attack On July 2 Meade successfully placed his soldiers in places where they could repel the Confederate attacks on the Union flanks The next day Meade s army gave Lee a crippling defeat by crushing the massive frontal assault on the center of the line In his report of the battle Meade gave much credit to the bravery of his men stating that they stubbornly resisted Lee s enormous attacks After the battle Meade was unable to pursue and destroy the Army of Northern Virginia General Robert E Lee was able to escape across the Potomac River into Virginia on July 13 Meade stated in his report that he made an effort to engage the Confederates He claimed that Lee had taken up strong defensive positions in the Fairfield Pass and that the Union army had to pause for a day to obtain supplies In a letter to Meade that he did not send Abraham Lincoln wrote I do not believe you appreciate the magnitude of the misfortune involved in Lee s escape Meade offered to resign but Lincoln kept him as commander of the army History often remembers the Battle of Gettysburg as a costly mistake made by Robert E Lee His failure to communicate the importance of taking Cemetery Ridge on July 1 his decision to attack the strong Union position on July 2 and the abysmal failure of Pickett s Charge make the battle seem more like Lee s blunder than a genius victory for Meade The defeat was

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5187 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Search
    Pennsylvania Tag s Civil War Gettysburg Immigrants After a long and fatiguing march we arrived on the evening of the 1st instant within about 3 miles of Gettysburg wrote Major Sergeant Clair Mulholland in his 1863 battlefield report There the 116 th Pennsylvania Infantry along with others of its Brigade awaited orders to the sound of the surrounding battle In the late afternoon the Brigade finally marched toward the battle Gettysburg s Harvest of Death Date s July 5 1863 Location ADAMS Pennsylvania Tag s Civil War Battle of Gettysburg Photography War The Battle of Gettysburg is remembered as the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War The fighting in Gettysburg Pennsylvania started in the early morning of July 1 1863 and lasted three days until July 3 Despite the Union s decisive victory at Gettysburg around 23 000 of their soldiers died during the three day battle whereas the Confederate Army lost 28 000 1 Photographs were The Surrender of Vicksburg Date s July 4 1863 Location WARREN Mississippi Tag s War After the Federal siege of Vicksburg Mississippi during the Civil War that lasted from May 18 1863 to July 4 1863 the Confederates surrendered Vicksburg It was the climax to the Vicksburg Campaign which was the Federals attempt to relinquish the stronghold of the Mississippi River that the Confederates held through Vicksburg Instead of attacking from the river the Union chose to attack The Burning of the Culp Home Date s July 1 1863 to July 3 1863 Location ADAMS Pennsylvania Tag s Crime Violence Civil War In an effort to take revenge on the North the ninth regiment of Alabama volunteers burned the Culp home in Gettysburg Pennsylvania during the Gettysburg campaign The reasons for this destruction are dictated by the volunteers as after they burnt

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18630701-18630713 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    Date s July 1 1863 to July 13 1863 Location ADAMS Pennsylvania Tag s War American Civil War Civil War George Meade was the commander of the Union Army of the Potomac during one of the most well known battles of the Civil War the Battle of Gettysburg from July 1 3 1863 and he is one of the war s least well known generals As Meade learned of the

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/519 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    the Battle of Chickamauga On September 19 1863 the forces of Lieutenant General Longstreet of the Confederate Army would face off with the forces of General Rosecrans For days Garfield and his fellow officers had prepared for the attack and he is recognized as knowing better than any man the disposition of the Union forces During the first day of the battle no notable victories achieved the battle seemingly favored the Union The following day September 20 1863 a message sent to Rosecrans noted that General Brannon s division was out of place leaving a chasm in the line Rosecrans immediately sent off an order to General Thomas Wood to close the gap however Wood dumbfounded could clearly see that Brannon was in his proper place The order sent to General Wood was the only order of the battle not personally penned by Garfield instead it was transcribed by Rosecrans s Senior Aide de Camp Major Frank Bond The ambiguity of the order was an oversight for the Union forces which were in position to win the battle Whether out of blind obedience or disdain for Rosecrans is a matter of debate but Wood followed the order and left his position According to the official Union report of the battle General Wood claims that the disposition of the order left him no option but to obey immediately In perfect timing Longstreet s forces attacked Wood s position after he vacated it overrunning the Union lines The scene following would be a stampede of Union men running for safety while Garfield and his fellow officers tried to restore order Useless against the stampede Garfield fled with Rosecrans who would go on to secure Chattanooga and win the campaign Garfield s memoirs would reflect exaggerated gallant efforts to preserve the Union lines

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5188 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Newsearch
    C Salt Lake Daily Harold 1881 In the ladies room of the train car two shots were fired at President Garfield with one bullet penetrating his right arm and the other piercing his abdomen just above the right hip near his kidney Salt Lake Daily Harold James A Garfield at Chickamauga Date s September 19 1863 to September 20 1863 Location WALKER Georgia Tag s The Battle of Chickamauga James

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/tags/view/923 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Courses
    Episodes Chamberlain s Defense of Little Round Top Date s July 2 1863 to July 3 1863 Location Tag s War Civil War Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain Gettysburg On July 2 1863 Colonel Strong Vincent looked to Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine regiment to defend Little Round Top at every hazard It was vital for the Union army to not lose this hilltop position to prevent the Confederates from breaking through their lines At Gettysburg the 20th Maine and other Union troops took both Little Round Top and Big Round Top They have become immortalized Braxton Bragg s Chickamauga Trouble with the Brass Date s September 19 1863 to September 20 1863 Location Tag s The Battle of Chickamauga Braxton Bragg General Braxton Bragg s Army of Tennessee was in sore need of a decisive victory in September 1863 Following the Army s failed invasion of Kentucky in 1862 Bragg had been steadily pushed out of Middle and Eastern Tennessee and into Georgia without putting up much of a fight General William Rosecrans had proven a formidable commander of the opposing Army of the Cumberland After General James Longstreet s The Burden of Defeat The XI Corps Breaks at Gettysburg

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/courses/view/64/2 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    This was a common occurrence seeing that there was a fight for supremacy in the social and economic realms during this time period An 1876 newspaper article from the Galveston News entitled Yellow Fever Ravages A Review of the Epidemic in Savannah shows the severity of the disease In a four month span between August and November in 1876 there were 1 574 deaths Of this total 940 of them were diagnosed with yellow fever while the remaining 634 were categorized as having other diseases The racial breakdown of these deaths showed that whites were affected more by these diseases than blacks seeing that 1058 of the deaths were whites and the remaining 516 were blacks This can show a genetic resistance to the disease between the races even though it must be kept in mind these numbers could be skewed for various reasons The author does not clearly state how accurate these numbers are when dealing with the racial breakdown of the population Some critics look at these death statistics and conclude the yellow fever epidemic in Savannah in 1876 was not as bad as others Even though there were a significant number of deaths from other diseases the number of people who died from yellow fever was still high Also doctors feared that these other diseases were actually different strands of the yellow fever disease This in turn would make yellow fever even more dangerous as well as more important of an issue Citizens of Savannah took pride in their cleanliness Savannah was said to be one of the healthiest seaboard cities if not the healthiest This raised much question as to why this disease would hit such a clean and healthy city This debate created a big controversy within the city and other surrounding cities Conclusions were

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/5441 (2016-02-15)
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