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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Location ALEXANDRIA CITY Virginia The Interstate Slave Trade Date s December 3 1832 Location Tag s African Americans Agriculture Economy Migration Transportation Slavery The Alexandria Gazette a newspaper of Alexandria Virginia published a small advertisement for 200 Negroes on December 3 1832 This ad placed by slave traders Franklin and Armfield requested slaves between 12 to 25 years of age field hands also mechanics of every description they were determined

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/14381 (2016-02-15)
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    for Although likely in the minority of his peers he was not alone in this belief GrimkÉ believed that nullification far more than being an overreaction to the tariffs was a step taken against the Republic Possessing such strong feelings about the nullification doctrine GrimkÉ took it upon himself to fight back by informing the citizens of South Carolina of the threat that such a doctrine posed In his pamphlet To The People Of The State Of South Carolina published December 1 1832 in Charleston GrimkÉ addressed these dangers Claiming that no other age no other country no other men have ever struck such a blow at Liberty GrimkÉ warned the citizens of his state that if they the state convention imitate the example of the Ordinance there is nothing they cannot nothing they will not do which they may judge necessary GrimkÉ against the idea of nullification itself was more concerned with the idea that South Carolina a state committed to their the Federal government s jurisdiction by a joint act of the States had no constitutional right to nullify any action or law of the Federal government He felt that if the state were allowed to ignore any

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3828 (2016-02-15)
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    the newspaper never alluded to whether it approved more of Jackson or South Carolina s constitutional theory Virginia like several other Southern states often struggled to reconcile her beliefs in state sovereignty and in preservation of the Union However fearing the damage a military confrontation would cause the paper expressed desperate desire for compromise stating In common with our countrymen we shall consider civil bloodshed as to be the most direful calamity that can possibly befall this free and happy land Early in President Jackson s administration Congress passed the protective tariff of 1828 which quickly came to be known to the South as the Tariff of Abominations The tariff intended to protect Northern industry from competing European goods by placing a higher tax on such products Cotton planters felt the tariff explicitly alienated them because it made their cost of living more expensive and greatly diminished Great Britain s cotton imports Although the tariff was abrasive to all Southern states under the leadership of Vice President and states rights champion John C Calhoun South Carolina led the rally against it Calling the tariff unconstitutional because it failed to promote the general welfare Calhoun called for nullification a doctrine that allowed states to void federal legislation if it breached the constitutional contract made between the states and the federal government Taking an immediate stand against nullification President Jackson exclaimed the power to annul a law is incompatible with the existence of the Union contradicted expressly by the Constitution unauthorized by its spirit inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded and destructive for the great object for which it was formed At the start of the crisis most Southern states shared South Carolina s hatred of the tariff but never quite embraced the radicalism of nullification The attitude the

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4032 (2016-02-15)
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    Law Race Relations Slavery Mary James had in front of her a valuable contract of exchange that would benefit her a great deal She was to acquire 775 worth of goods in this posthumous division of James Henley s property In this particular transaction however others loss far outweighed her gain The property divided was Henley s eight slaves valued from 50 for the young to 350 for the adults These enslaved Virginia in the Nullification Crisis of 1832 Date s December 10 1832 Location CAMPBELL Virginia Tag s Economy Government Law Politics They have gone so far that it is even more difficult to recede than go on and they had rather see the Union dissolved tomorrow than that their own proposition should be accepted proclaimed the Lynchburg Virginian in reference to South Carolina s actions in December 1832 It all began in 1828 when Congress enacted the so called Tariff of Abominations Many Southerners thought the highly President Jackson Responds to Nullification Date s December 10 1832 Location Washington City District of Columbia Tag s Economy Government Law Politics The crisis threatened to tear the nation apart This crisis was the passage of the Nullification Ordinances by the South Carolina State Assembly in November of 1832 The unity and survival of the nation depended upon President Andrew Jackson s response On December 10 1832 President Jackson presented his response to the Congress arguing that the justification for state nullification The Outcast of Virginia Date s December 8 1832 Location LOUISA Virginia Tag s Government Law Politics A Voice from Louisa wrote to the Richmond Enquirer in December 1832 with the hope that a man like John Tyler would not be elected as a United States Senator once again Instead the writer expressed the importance of knowing the political

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18321215 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Search Location SPOTSYLVANIA Virginia Radicalism vs Rationality Date s December 15 1832 Location Tag s Economy Government Politics On Saturday December 15 1832 the Virginia Herald expressed its grief over the Nullification Crisis with the words alarming as the crisis is we cling to the hope that for the sake of humanity and the honor of our country and her institutions that means of averting the impending storm may yet

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/14290 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    Hawks Calhoun continued his rise in politics on December 14 1817 when James Monroe asked him to be his Secretary of War Things began to fall apart when a tariff was introduced and Calhoun believed it would make it more difficult for the South to conduct foreign trade through cotton Calhoun denounced the abominable tariff saying the great geographical Northern manufacturing interest in order to enforce more effectually the system of monopoly and extortion against the consuming states In March of 1825 Calhoun became Andrew Jackson s vice president but drew controvery by writing South Carolina Exposition and Protest He defended a states right to nullify a Federal law that impeded a states interest while he was the vice president He soon realized he had limited power as the vice president and resigned to be elected Senator of South Carolina On November 24 1832 South Carolina held a contitutional convention and nullified the tariffs of 1824 and 1828 with Calhoun s full support behind his state Andrew Jackson s response to the convention came in December of 1832 when he declared nullification as being incompatiable with the existence of the Union This is the time in which GrimkÉ is writing his letter to Calhoun Thomas GrimkÉ tries to indirectly explain to Calhoun how he would treat the tense situation He does this by describing what his ideal country and an ideal statesman would be He must resolve and abide by that resolution with inflexible constancy never to harbor a thought not utter a word nor do a deed that may by any possibility suggest the opinion that the Union can ever be abandoned GrimkÉ is trying to explain to Calhoun how he would handle the situation of the south by abandoning any talk of secession or nullifaction He continues to

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/4090 (2016-02-15)
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    Economy John C Calhoun led an ambitious political life He sat in James Monroe s Cabinet in the 1810s and 1820s Then in the hotly contested presidential election of 1824 Calhoun ran but resigned himself to second place where he neatly fit in as John Quincy Adams vice president In a time when political party affiliations were never stable Calhoun aligned himself with Andrew Jackson half way Runaway Slaves and Missing Steers Equality Under Southern Law Date s December 28 1832 Location NORFOLK CITY Virginia Tag s African Americans Economy Law Race Relations Slavery Slave owners and merchants reading the December 28 1832 edition of the American Beacon gazed with curiosity at the plethora of goods available for sale in the local market Advertisements present in the Norfolk based newspaper attempted to sell goods such as Christmas supplies hats and chlorine tooth wash While these impersonal objects were goods commonly traded and sold in Ad in Charleston Mercury Offers Ladies Benefits of an Academy Education Date s November 17 1832 Location CHARLESTON South Carolina Tag s Arts Leisure Education Urban Life Boosterism Women On Saturday November 17 1832 an ad appeared in the Charleston Mercury for a Young Ladies French and English Academy which had just opened in Philadelphia Such ads for girl s academies were not uncommon in the 1830s for over the span of the early 1800s there was a growing trend for families to send their daughters to one of these schools if they could afford it The popularity Botanical Drops and Disease in the South Date s December 29 1832 Location FAYETTE Kentucky Tag s Health Death Science Technology A child of 8 years had lost the use of his arms one leg was almost crippled hip popped out of place thigh and arms swollen wrote

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18321208/2 (2016-02-15)
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    Politics War Sectional tensions between the North and South increased following the Tariff of 1828 The tariff placed a high tax on foreign goods to stimulate domestic manufacturing and in turn placed strains on the Southern economy as the British reduced their imports of cotton Many declared the tariff unconstitutional and thought that it infringed upon the individual states rights To quell the Random Crime Shocks Charleston Date s October 29 1832 Location CHARLESTON South Carolina Tag s African Americans Crime Violence Government Race Relations Slavery Urban Life Boosterism Today s well intended celebrations of Halloween were nothing compared to the horrors that took place one haunting October in 19th century Charleston On a Saturday night in late October 1832 Joseph Wienand the manager of the Neptune Hotel in Charleston was murdered Apparently he was in possession of between 200 and 300 in cash His murder was discovered by his African American female servant Alexander Rives Asks James Madison for Advice about Nullification and Secession Date s December 28 1832 to January 12 1833 Location ALBEMARLE Virginia Tag s Government Law Politics In the early 1830s two of the most pressing questions in the nation were the issues of nullification and secession A common trend among politicians was to use the ideas of the founders to argue both for and against these ideas hence it is not surprising that on December 28 1832 Alexander Rives a Virginia lawyer wrote to James Madison one of the last surviving Founding Fathers seeking council Mr Clay comes to Staunton Virginia Date s July 27 1832 to November 1832 Location AUGUSTA Virginia Tag s Government Politics Urban Life Boosterism Augusta County Virginia was clearly Whig Country come the election of 1832 The Annals of Augusta County a historical record speaks of an imposing and

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18321208/3 (2016-02-15)
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