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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Episodes
    presented themselves in front of the West Virginian legislature they would have been met with a most respectful and courteous reception at the hands of the members yet I think I am not mistaken in saying that a proposition for the reunion of the states would not have been entertained for a moment but would have been rejected by the unanimous vote of both houses Boreman then went on to write that the legislature would have been happy to consider the debt question but not being advised of any movement in the General Assembly of Virginia they delayed the matter until it was dropped Secession from Virginia was the result of long held divisions within Virginia but it would not have happened without the Civil War and Virginia s decision to secede from the Union It was only following this decision that a convention was held to declare West Virginia separate in May 1861 This started the process which eventually led to Lincoln s recognition of the division of Virginia in 1863 West Virginia was not interested in reunification in 1866 as they had long seen themselves as separate from the rest of Virginia They resented the fact that east Virginia had better representation in Congress as its constituencies were smaller In addition the tax breaks of those in the slave holding east angered the west as slaveholders were exempt from paying taxes on their slaves Geographic divisions further helped create a feeling of separation and an unwillingness to defend their neighbors in the east against the Union Debt became a problem for Virginia following the Civil War as Virginia had been the battleground for the war and was now devastated as a result In addition West Virginia s secession had deprived Virginia of a third of its tax paying

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3976 (2016-02-15)
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    state leader by the name of Drake passed what was called the Iron Clad Oath The Iron Clad Oath was a severe and Hard Times for Confederate Supporters After the War Date s March 26 1866 Location ORLEANS Louisiana Tag s Economy Migration Transportation Urban Life Boosterism War On March 26 1866 a member of the Digges family in New Orleans Louisiana wrote a letter to N A Hanney of Rockport Texas The letter described the family s financial crisis as a result of the Civil War The letter writer whose name is obscured by damage to the document blamed his financial problems on investment in Confederate bonds purchased in order to support the war effort After the West Virginia Refuses Reunification Date s March 1866 Location OHIO Virginia Tag s Government Politics West Virginia would not consider reunification in 1866 In 1866 Governor Boreman of West Virginia responded to Alexander H H Stuart s letter which had asked Boreman for West Virginia s stance on reunification and the settlement of state debt Boreman wrote that if the Virginia commissioners whom Stuart numbered among had presented themselves in front of the West Virginian legislature Freedmen s Bureau Simply Welfare Or

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18660301-18660330 (2016-02-15)
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  • History Engine: Tools for Collaborative Education and Research | Fips
    Search Search Location OHIO Virginia West Virginia Refuses Reunification Date s March 1866 Location Tag s Government Politics West Virginia would not consider reunification in 1866 In 1866 Governor Boreman of West Virginia responded to Alexander H H Stuart s letter which had asked Boreman for West Virginia s stance on reunification and the settlement of state debt Boreman wrote that if the Virginia commissioners whom Stuart numbered among had

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/14750 (2016-02-15)
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    divided ownership of several plantations and a considerable number of slaves in her will The bulk of her slaves went to her son Charles but Beverly spent extra time dividing slave children to her other designated heirs noting to my daughter Lavinice I also give a girl called Caroline and a boy called Richard the former the child of Maria and the latter a child of Fanny This casual reference of forcibly removing children from their families reflects the fragile position of slaves especially children in the plantation South While some planters gave the impression that they cared for their slaves and did their best not to separate families especially children and their mothers in most cases simple economics won out over good intent Records of slave traders indicated that sometimes 25 percent of their overall sales were of children sold individually in order to make the most profit The division of slave families was also a regular occurrence when an owner died and passed his or her slaves down to their heirs or designated slaves to be sold in order to pay off debts As in Beverly Randolph s case children were completely separated from both of their parents

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3829 (2016-02-15)
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    Agriculture Economy Migration Transportation The March 30 edition of The Alexandria Gazette of the year 1841 included an article that would prove to be extremely insightful regarding the future of the America South It opened with the lined Valley of the Mississippi The balance of political power in this country will soon become firmly fixed west of the Alleghany Mountains The influx of population is so rapid and the fertility of John Charles Fremont Explores the American West Date s May 2 1841 Location ST LOUIS Missouri Tag s Migration Transportation In 1841 Fremont originally raised in Charleston South Carolina made the first of five major explorations of the American West With financial assistance from his father in law Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton Fremont embarked westward to explore the Oregon Trail During this journey Fremont established and mapped a route through the Rocky Mountains from the Mississippi River to South Presidential Election Campaign Date s January 1 1840 to November 23 1840 Location Washington City District of Columbia Tag s Slavery The 1840 presidential election campaign pitted the Whig ticket of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler against the sitting Democratic President Martin Van Buren The parties spent much of their energy courting the South Each tried to present itself as the protector of southern interests emphasizing its candidates southern ness and anti abolition credentials Van Buren running The Changing Public Attitude towards Slavery Date s March 10 1841 Location NEW YORK New York Tag s Slavery Anti slavery Abolition In the mid 19 th century the changes in the public mindset towards slavery had not yet been fully reinforced by law but the distaste with which other countries had viewed the institution for some time was clear Blatant racism was still plainly evident yet the abolition movement was

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18410412 (2016-02-15)
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    Virginia Stolen Away Slave Children Date s April 12 1841 Location Tag s African Americans Economy Migration Transportation Race Relations Slavery Women Beverly Randolph of Powhatan Virginia carefully planned her last will and testament to divide equally her assets amongst her children In the late 1830s Mrs Randolph divided ownership of several plantations and a considerable number of slaves in her will The bulk of her slaves went to her

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/fips/view/14160 (2016-02-15)
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    controlled many prestigious government and military positions Hamburg had undergone nearly eleven years of Reconstruction that had in the opinion of South Carolinian Sam Aleckson brought some tranquility to the state and people Nonetheless the success of Reconstruction especially in Hamburg was blemished when a white Ku Klux Klan mob assaulted a black militia group led by South Carolina National Guard Captain Doc L Adams At the time of the incident Adams regiment had been parading legally on the streets of Hamburg in celebration of the Fourth of July Two white men Messrs Henry Gatzen and Thomas Butler approached them and instructed them to move to the side of the road which they did begrudgingly This action however was not enough for Mr Butler and he reported the militia company for obstructing the highway to the local trial justice Mr Prince Rivers who printed out a warrant against Capt Adams This action Mr Butler carried out in accordance with South Carolina law The second action Mr Butler took however was much less lawful Butler related the stubborn response of the militia company to his cousin General M C Butler an ex Confederate general and a participant in Ku Klux Klan activities who took the law into his own hands demanding that the militia company turn over its legally held weaponry as well as summoning an armed mob from Augusta Georgia to assault the black National Guard regiment Soon after Butler s mob forced the militia men into a local house and threatened to blow up the house with cannon fire Weary of this threat the militia company escaped the building but was unable to evade General Butler s mob which murdered five and severely wounded three of the captured African Americans This violence occurred for no other reason than the

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/episodes/view/3831 (2016-02-15)
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    was illuminated with fireworks and gunfire when Kentucky got wind of the ratification of Samuel J Tilden and Rutherford B Hendricks on the Democratic ticket for the presidential election of 1876 Once word of the nominations reached Frankfort county and the town of Franklin celebrations began immediately One Hundred guns were fired from Taylor s Hills and bonfires and illuminations Hamburg Massacre Date s July 4 1876 to July 5 1876 Location LEXINGTON South Carolina Tag s African Americans Crime Violence Race Relations On July 4 a Black militia gathered in Hamburg South Carolina a center of Reconstruction and Black power to celebrate the nation s centennial A white farmer arrived on the scene and ordered the militia to move aside for their carriage Although the militia eventually opened ranks the next day the farmer demanded to a state justice that the leader of the militia Dock Adams be arrested 100 Years to Remember Date s July 3 1876 to July 4 1876 Location JEFFERSON Kentucky Tag s Arts Leisure Economy Government Politics The streets were packed and a euphoric energy filled the air as the men women and children of Louisville Kentucky played their role in the largest county as well as national display of patriotism executed to date Louisville Kentucky put forth an immaculate display of admiration and tribute in their celebrations of the Centennial On the night of July 3 Mayor Charles D Jacob requested Prairie Farmer Breaks News of Custer Disaster Date s July 15 1876 Location BIG HORN Montana Tag s Government Native Americans Race Relations War It proved a rash and disastrous venture noted the Prairie Farmer in criticism of Lieutenant General George Custer s effort to divide his regiment into two detachments one under the command of Major Reno and the other commanded

    Original URL path: http://historyengine.richmond.edu/search/dates/18760704-18760716 (2016-02-15)
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