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  • mGlu2 | Newswire
    or other disorder More Tags Bruce McEwen Bruce S McEwen Carla Nasca epigenetics Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology mGlu2 P300 Stress September 2 2014 Science News Research hints at why stress is more devastating for some Some bounce back from stress while others struggle with it even developing anxiety and depression as a result In experiments with mice researchers have revealed the molecular origins of this so

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/mglu2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • P300 | Newswire
    Researchers have shown how changes in gene expression cause these transitory opportunities to open up Their results suggest well timed treatment could change the trajectory of a brain suffering from depression or other disorder More Tags Bruce McEwen Bruce S McEwen Carla Nasca epigenetics Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology mGlu2 P300 Stress Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/p300/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Stress | Newswire
    course especially when it comes to the psychological But new research linking a gene in mice to anxious behavior raises the prospect that we get some anxiety disorders from a piece of DNA we share with the little mammals The gene Lynx2 alters neurotransmission in parts of the mouse brain associated with anxiety The same parts are associated with anxiety in humans More Tags Lynx2 Nathaniel Heintz Stress January 27 2009 Science News Stress disrupts human thinking but the brain can bounce back Med school students prepping for their boards and rodents digging for food have a bit of psychology in common Stress hampers their nimbler thinking abilities A new neuroimaging study building on earlier rodent research shows that stressed out men like rats have a hard time shifting their attention from one task to another But the work holds good news too for both rats and humans Their brains are resilient Less than one month after the stress disappears the quick thinking returns More Tags Bruce S McEwen Stress October 27 2008 Science News In mice anxiety is linked to immune system In groundbreaking research that advances the knowledge of how the two most complicated systems in the body are linked researchers reveal that immune cells in the brain directly influence how mice normally behave in stressful situations The work is the first ever to genetically link mast cells to anxiety and opens new doors for drugs that target immune cells in the brain to regulate emotions More Tags Donald W Pfaff Stress November 19 2007 Science News Stress response in the brain relies on a blood thinning protein Our ability to learn from stressful situations allows us to try to avoid them in the future New research by Rockefeller University scientists shows that a protein called tPA in the hippocampus a region of the brain responsible for memory learning and fear plays an essential role in this learned fear response and could be involved in depression More Tags Sidney Strickland Stress November 2 2006 Science News Chronic stress effects attention by altering neuronal response in the brain Anxiety and depression can make a person feel as if he s battling his own brain complete with wounds and scars Traumatic events war divorce the death of a loved one can trigger these disorders and scientists are just beginning to clarify the biological connection Now working neuron by neuron researchers have found that life experiences actually appear to change the length and complexity of individual brain cells More Tags Bruce S McEwen Stress February 22 2006 Science News Genetic stress response may explain how bacteria resist drugs Bacteria have a nasty habit of developing resistance to even our most powerful pharmaceuticals But by tracking the staph infection of a single patient during a course of antibiotic treatment Rockefeller University scientists have discovered new clues to how bacteria evolve resistance More Tags Alexander Tomasz antibiotics drug resisitance Stress December 13 2005 Science News Neurons in the brain change shape when stressed

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/stress/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Study links epigenetic processes to the development of the cerebellar circuitry | Newswire
    simple brain structure yet its function is anything but simple This part of the brain controls our ability to move learn new motor skills such as those required to play an instrument and perceive the body s position motion and equilibrium Hatten s research on the development of the mammalian brain including the cerebellum has focused on two crucial stages the birth of neurons and the migration of immature neurons to form the layers that are a basic structural element of this part of the brain After the young neurons are in place they send out branches called dendrites to connect to fibers from other parts of the brain and establish ion channels which make it possible for them to become electrically active Until now no one knew how the genes that control these two processes were activated New ways to study gene activation Two developments in technology made the current study possible The first TRAP was developed at Rockefeller It enables researchers to map gene expression in specific types of neurons Hatten s team applied this method to identify the genes expressed in granule cells one of the two cell types that make up the cerebellum in the mouse brain from birth through adulthood They focused on changes in gene expression 12 to 21 days after birth since this is the main period during which the circuitry of the cerebellum is formed The second key method used in the study is metagene analysis a mathematical model developed at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard that allows researchers to study large sets of genes and see changes in patterns that would be too difficult to interpret by looking at individual genes Three investigators from Broad collaborated on the current study Using this analytical tool we showed that during this

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/12/21/study-links-epigenetic-processes-to-the-development-of-the-cerebellar-circuitry/ (2016-02-13)
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  • cerebellum | Newswire
    the pivotal changes responsible for controlling the formation of the part of the brain that allows us to learn and execute complex movements These changes involve modifications to chromatin which is DNA packaged with protein More Tags cerebellum chromatin epigenetics Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology Mary E Hatten Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/cerebellum/ (2016-02-13)
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  • chromatin | Newswire
    leading to this molecular explosion which serves as a precursor to cancer More Tags cancer chromatin chromothripsis Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics telomeres Titia de Lange December 8 2015 Science News Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off sleeping sickness parasite There are currently few treatments for the disease and those that exist have substantial side effects A new study reveals a method involving epigenetic mechanisms that causes the African sleeping sickness parasite to change into a new state potentially making it easier for the host immune system to eliminate it More Tags African sleeping sickness chromatin F Nina Papavasiliou Günter Blobel immunology Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology parasitic infection small molecule inhibitors Virology and Microbiology December 10 2014 Science News Discovery links shift in metabolism to stem cell renewal New research links stem cell metabolism with those cells decision to pick a fate or renew themselves In experiments exposure to a key metabolite called alpha ketoglutarate enhanced the renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells More Tags alpha ketoglutarate Bryce Carey chromatin Craig Thompson David Allis differentiation epigenetics Lydia Finley Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center metabolism methylation stem cells November 10 2014 Awards and Honors C David Allis wins the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences Allis is recognized for his foundational research on the unexpected regulation of gene activation by modifications to proteins that package DNA work with implications for many diseases including cancer The Breakthrough Prize is worth 3 million making it the richest prize in the life sciences roughly double the Nobel Prize More Tags Breakthrough Prize C David Allis chromatin epigenetics gene regulation histones Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics January 28 2014 Awards and Honors David Allis pioneer in epigenetics to receive prestigious Japan Prize Allis s discovery that chemical tags

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/chromatin/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology | Newswire
    to control the early migration of neurons Long before our nervous system is able to see smell touch hear or speak the earliest neurons that make it up must be precisely guided to the proper layers in the developing brain Exactly how this early neuron migration happens has been elusive but a better understanding of it could lead to insight into myriad developmental problems including autism and schizophrenia New research

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-developmental-neurobiology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Mary E. Hatten | Newswire
    unique form of cell migration giving insight into the delicate layering of the brain that underlies the formation of synaptic circuitry More Tags Mary E Hatten Neurons May 29 2009 Science News Genetic profiling reveals genes active in the earliest brain circuit construction Screening for genes that guide the earliest formation of the embryonic brain researchers identified 229 specifically responsible for subplate neurons which form the initial scaffolding for assembling cortical circuits The work indicates the breadth of factors involved in initial neurogenesis and provides investigators with a biochemical handle to start investigating the various contributions More Tags Mary E Hatten March 28 2007 Science News New glimpse into early brain development shows how nerve cells move into position By pinning down how cells in the brain s cerebellum migrate and differentiate during the first stages of brain development researchers show that different combinations of regulatory proteins called transcription factors are responsible for driving these changes More Tags Mary E Hatten transcription factors March 14 2007 Science News Chemical cues turn embryonic stem cells into cerebellar neurons vIn order to differentiate and specialize stem cells require very specific environmental cues in a very specific order and scientists have so far been unable to prod them to go through each of the necessary steps But now for the first time a study in mice shows that embryonic stem cells implanted in the brain appear to develop into fully differentiated granule neurons the most plentiful neuron in the cerebellum More Tags Mary E Hatten stem cells October 12 2004 Science News Cellular Two Step Following the often quoted advice of Yogi Berra You can observe a lot by just watching Rockefeller University scientists show that nerve cells in the developing brains of humans and other mammals move in a two part step

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/mary-e-hatten/ (2016-02-13)
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