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  • Laboratory of Molecular Neuro-oncology | Newswire
    opting one microRNA the virus may cause changes in gene expression in liver cells More Tags Charles Rice hepatitis C Joseph Luna Laboratory of Molecular Neuro oncology Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease liver cancer microRNA miRNA 122 robert darnell November 28 2012 Campus News Robert Darnell named president of New York Genome Center Darnell will direct all aspects of the NYGC including its scientific and research activities and the recruitment and development of a world class scientific team in genomic research and medicine Founded in 2010 the NYGC will be one of the largest genomics research facilities in North America integrating sequencing bioinformatics and data management More Tags genomics Laboratory of Molecular Neuro oncology RNA Robert B Darnell October 11 2010 Awards and Honors Two Rockefeller scientists elected to Institute of Medicine Rockefeller University scientists Robert B Darnell head of the Laboratory of Molecular Neuro oncology and Titia de Lange head of the Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics have been elected to the Institute of Medicine the health and medicine branch of the National Academy of Sciences More Tags Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory of Molecular Neuro oncology Robert B Darnell Titia de Lange Search for

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-molecular-neuro-oncology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Titia de Lange receives AACR Clowes Award | Newswire
    Biology and Genetics She focuses on how telomeres protect chromosome ends de Lange identified a protein complex at telomeres called shelterin and has shown how this complex hides the chromosome end from the cellular machinery that detects and repairs broken DNA ends Telomeres undergo erosion in the early stages of cancer development and de Lange s work has clarified how the loss of telomere function generates genome instability and can drive cancer progression A native of the Netherlands de Lange received her Ph D from the University of Amsterdam and came to Rockefeller University in 1990 She is a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences and has received the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research and the National Institutes of Health Director s Pioneer Award among other honors The Clowes Award was established in 1961 to honor George H A Clowes a founding member of the AACR It is given annually to an individual with outstanding recent accomplishments in basic cancer research The prize is jointly sponsored by the AACR and Eli Lilly and Company Previous Rockefeller recipients of the Clowes Award are Peyton Rous Hidesaburo Hanafusa and Arnold J Levine Tags American Association for Cancer Research G

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/04/21/titia-de-lange-receives-aacr-clowes-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award | Newswire
    the 50th annual recipient of the American Association of Cancer Research s award to an individual with outstanding recent accomplishments in basic cancer research More Tags American Association for Cancer Research G H A Clowes Memorial Award Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics Titia de Lange Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/g-h-a-clowes-memorial-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Titia de Lange awarded grant, named American Cancer Society Research Professor | Newswire
    repeats to chromosome ends in order to counteract the telomere shortening that occurs during cell division Most human cells however do not contain telomerase and the degradation of telomeres that thus occurs through many cycles of cell division leads to aging and eventual death of those cells Cancer cells on the other hand often contain high levels of telomerase allowing them to proliferate indefinitely The goal of de Lange s research is to understand how telomeres protect chromosome ends how they interact with and regulate telomerase and what happens when telomere function is lost In its second of two grant cycles for 2009 the American Cancer Society awarded over 45 million to 94 investigators at 61 institutions across the country Since its founding in 1946 the organization s extramural research grants program has devoted approximately 3 4 billion to cancer research De Lange earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Amsterdam in 1977 her M S from the University of Amsterdam and the National Institute for Medical Research in London in 1981 and her Ph D in biochemistry from the University of Amsterdam and the Netherlands Cancer Institute in 1985 From 1985 to 1990 she was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Nobel laureate Harold Varmus at the University of California San Francisco where she was one of the first scientists to isolate the telomeres of human chromosomes She came to Rockefeller University in 1990 as assistant professor and was promoted to associate professor in 1994 and professor in 1997 She was named Leon Hess Professor in 1999 De Lange is also associate director of the university s Anderson Center for Cancer Research De Lange is an elected member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences the New York Academy of Sciences the European Molecular Biology Organization the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/12/23/titia-de-lange-awarded-grant-named-american-cancer-society-research-professor/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Research resolves contradiction over protein’s role at telomeres | Newswire
    from the past decade It seemed unlikely that Rap1 s role would have changed so dramatically between mice and humans and now we know that it didn t Human Rap1 is in fact quite mouse like de Lange says But this raises another question since Rap1 s evolutionary lineage extends back to budding yeast If Rap1 doesn t protect telomeres why has evolution maintained it in mice and humans Telomeres are DNA protein complexes formed when shelterin binds to specific repetitive DNA sequences that protect the integrity of chromosomes Dysfunctional telomeres have been linked to cancer and aging therefore it is imperative that telomeres are properly maintained which means maintaining their length Shelterin helps regulate telomere length and also protects them from misguided cellular processes including erroneous DNA repair efforts that can have disastrous repercussions Rap1 is one of six shelterin components in humans and mice and one that evolution has maintained for a very long time all the way back to yeast and single celled parasites called trypanosomes Beginning about a decade ago research suggested that human Rap1 was important for telomere function Rap1 was shown to be involved in controlling the length of telomeres and also preventing a repair process that fuses telomeres together which would ultimately result in cell death Meanwhile studies in which Rap1 was inactivated in mice produced not only apparently normal cells but also apparently normal mice so clearly erroneous DNA repair was not fusing chromosomes together Furthermore no changes in mouse telomere length were detected However because mice have much longer telomeres than humans subtle changes are difficult to detect Studies from both sides of this human mouse discrepancy included those from de Lange s lab After working on experiments showing that Rap1 was not needed to prevent telomere fusion in mice a graduate student in the lab Shaheen Kabir set out to investigate the conflicting reports by inactivating Rap1 in humans To do so she disrupted the gene encoding Rap1 by using a site specific nuclease called TALEN a special enzyme designed to cut DNA at a specific location constructed by fellow author Dirk Hockemeyer then at MIT We piled up a lot of negative data looking for effects of removing Rap1 from human telomeres We observed no fusions no significant changes in telomere length no turning on of DNA damage signaling the list goes on Kabir says In considering what might account for the discrepancy between the current results and the previous studies Kabir and de Lange think the techniques used may have produced results that were difficult to interpret for some studies while others employed artificial systems that may not accurately represent the normal situation in a cell While we cannot dismiss the possibility that Rap1 has a redundant function that overlaps with other shelterin components it is most likely that Rap1 must fill some other unrelated role Otherwise why would it be so strongly conserved Kabir says Evidence for that other function was already there Rap1 was first identified

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/11/06/research-resolves-contradiction-over-proteins-role-at-telomeres/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Rap1 | Newswire
    in the protective caps on human chromosomes researchers engineered the telomeres to lack this protein Previous studies suggested the altered telomeres would attach to one another but they did not More Tags chromosomes Laboratory of Cell Biology andGenetics Rap1 Shaheen Kabir shelterin telomeres Titia de Lange Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/rap1/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Shaheen Kabir | Newswire
    in the protective caps on human chromosomes researchers engineered the telomeres to lack this protein Previous studies suggested the altered telomeres would attach to one another but they did not More Tags chromosomes Laboratory of Cell Biology andGenetics Rap1 Shaheen Kabir shelterin telomeres Titia de Lange Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/shaheen-kabir/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Handle with care: Telomeres resemble DNA fragile sites | Newswire
    posed by telomeres At the center of the discovery is a protein known as TRF1 which de Lange in an effort to understand how telomeres protect chromosome ends discovered in 1995 Using a conditional mouse knockout de Lange and Sfeir have now revealed that TRF1 which is part of a six protein complex called shelterin enables DNA replication to drive smoothly through telomeres with the aid of two other proteins Telomeric DNA has a repetitive sequence that can form unusual DNA structures when the DNA is unwound during DNA replication says de Lange Our data suggest that TRF1 brings in two proteins that can take out these structures in the telomeric DNA In other words TRF1 and its helpers remove the bumps in the road so that the replication fork can drive through The work published in the July 10 issue of Cell began when Sfeir deleted TRF1 and saw that the telomeres resembled common fragile sites suggesting that TRF1 protects telomeres from becoming fragile Instead of a continuous string of DNA the telomeres were broken into fragments of twos and threes To see if the replication fork stalls at telomeres de Lange and Sfeir joined forces with Carl L Schildkraut a researcher at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City Using a technique called SMARD the researchers observed the dynamics of replication across individual DNA molecules the first time this technique has been used to study telomeres In the absence of TRF1 the fork often stalled for a considerable amount of time The only other known replication problem posed by telomeres was solved in 1985 when it was shown that the enzyme telomerase elongates telomeres which shorten during every cell division The second problem posed by telomeres the so called end protection problem was solved by de

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/07/09/handle-with-care-telemores-resemble-dna-fragile-sites/ (2016-02-13)
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