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  • Science Outreach Program | Newswire
    Outreach student Eugene Simuni was awarded a 25 000 scholarship for his fifth place win in the Intel Science Talent Search A senior at Midwood High School Simuni was mentored by Ethan Marin of the Sakmar lab His project explored protein transmission of visual signals to the brain Simuni was also chosen by his fellow finalists to receive the Glenn T Seaborg Award for his commitment to scientific cooperation and communication More Tags Eugene Simuni Intel Science Talent Search Science Outreach Program Thomas P Sakmar February 1 2000 Awards and Honors Four Rockefeller Science Outreach students are finalists in Intel Science Talent Search Four out of the 10 Science Outreach students who reached the semifinalist stage in the Intel Science Talent Search have been named finalists Evan Fink Adam Kahn Chrisann Kyi and Eugene Simuni Only 40 finalists are named each year In March the finalists will travel to Washington D C to participate in a week long competition Ten winners will be announced at a black tie dinner on Mon Mar 13 and will receive scholarships ranging from 20 000 to 100 000 The remaining 30 finalists will each receive a 5 000 scholarship More Tags Intel Science Talent Search Science Outreach Program January 24 2000 Campus News Ten Science Outreach students reach semifinals of Intel Science Talent Search Ten out of the 60 high school students who participated in RU s Science Outreach Program have been named semifinalists in the Intel Science Talent Search formerly the Westinghouse Science Talent Search This program now in its 59th year is one of the most prestigious science awards for high school students in the country More than 70 percent of the former finalists have gone on to earn Ph D s or M D s five have won Nobel Prizes More

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/science-outreach-program/ (2016-02-13)
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  • New findings shed light on fundamental process of DNA repair | Newswire
    to be to facilitate the process This is also a nice example of how innovative chemical approaches can help decipher fundamental biological mechanisms adds Kapoor who serves as Pels Family Professor at Rockefeller When DNA strands break the cell ideally puts them back together and carries on as usual But sometimes repairs don t go that smoothly For instance different regions of a chromosome can fuse together causing genes to rearrange themselves and such chromosome fusions can lead to diseases such as cancer To learn more about the process Kapoor Kleiner and their colleagues zeroed in on the sites in chromosomes where DNA repair happens Specifically they focused on a single histone a type of protein that DNA wraps around to make up chromosomes This histone H2AX is known to be involved in DNA repair Immediately after DNA damage occurs H2AX gets a mark it becomes tagged with a chemical moiety known as a phosphate This process called phosphorylation occurs at sites of broken DNA as a way to mediate interactions between key proteins In the study the researchers wanted to learn more about how phosphorylation of H2AX helps mediate DNA repair The researchers employed a new method for scrutinizing the DNA repair process To learn more about which proteins interact with H2AX when it becomes phosphorylated they added their own light sensitive chemical tags to a portion of the histone This tag was designed such that it became activated only when the researchers shone a light upon it Once activated the tag reacts with interacting proteins facilitating their capture and isolation This technique enabled the researchers to identify not just the proteins that were known to strongly bind to H2AX and facilitate DNA repair but also those that were considered weak binders as well says Kleiner Indeed they found

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/09/08/new-findings-shed-light-on-fundamental-process-of-dna-repair/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Cell Biology | Newswire
    Science News New technique allows scientists to penetrate yeast cells hard exterior Injections are a useful tool for cell biologists They allow researchers to administer proteins and chemicals directly to the inside of a single cell A new technique developed at Rockefeller University makes this possible for the first time in cells that were previously considered too hard to be penetrated by traditional methods By using a micropipette like a

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/cell-biology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Ralph Kleiner | Newswire
    component of the molecular machinery a cell uses to repair damaged DNA The discovery adds important knowledge about a fundamental life process that protects from diseases such as cancer More Tags 53BP1 Cell Biology chemistry DNA repair genetic and genomics H2AX Ralph Kleiner Tarun Kapoor Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/ralph-kleiner/ (2016-02-13)
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  • mosquitoes | Newswire
    To understand the evolutionary basis of the mosquito s attraction to humans scientists examined the genes that drive preferences of two different subspecies Their findings suggest that Aedes aegypti aegypti acquired a love for human body odor a key step in specializing on people More Tags aedes aegypti evolution Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Leslie Vosshall mosquitoes February 27 2014 Science News Research shows combination of sensory signals draw mosquitoes in for a bite Researchers used a genome editing technique to engineer a mutant version of the Aedes aegypti mosquito which spreads yellow fever The mutant was unable to detect carbon dioxide and studies showed that this hindered its ability to detect a host even in the presence of other sensory cues like heat and odor The results can help inform the design of chemical repellents to block host seeking behavior in both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae which spreads malaria More Tags aedes aegypti dengue fever Leslie B Vosshall malaria mosquitoes yellow fever June 1 2013 Science News Mutant mosquitoes lose their appetite for humans Scientists in Leslie Vosshall s Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior at Rockefeller used a genetically modified mosquito to show that a

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/mosquitoes/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeffrey M. Friedman and Leslie B. Vosshall named 2014 AAAS Fellows | Newswire
    food intake and energy expenditure Leptin has powerful effects on reproduction metabolism other endocrine systems and even immune function Friedman s lab has shown that high leptin levels are associated with resistance to leptin and has provided evidence that suggests that animals destined to be obese increase their production of leptin to satisfy a higher set point for weight These observations have reframed views on the pathogenesis of obesity and suggested that the development of approaches to improve leptin response in resistant individuals could provide new treatments for obesity Friedman received his Ph D from Rockefeller and was appointed to the faculty in 1986 He has been an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 1986 A member of the National Academy of Sciences and its Institute of Medicine as well as the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Friedman s recent honors include the 2005 Gairdner Foundation International Award the 2005 Passano Award the 2009 Shaw Prize in Life Sciences and the 2010 Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research Vosshall who is the Robin Chemers Neustein Professor head of the Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator was elected in recognition of her contributions to the field of biological sciences particularly on the molecular basis of insect olfaction The Vosshall lab identified the genes that mediate odor and carbon dioxide perception in insects They found that insects have evolved a set of smell receptors unlike those found in other animals and humans One member of the odorant gene family Orco is of particular interest as it is unique in being expressed in nearly all olfactory neurons and is highly conserved across insect evolution Vosshall s lab has shown that Orco functions as a coreceptor working in tandem with odorant receptors in the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/12/23/jeffrey-m-friedman-and-leslie-b-vosshall-named-2014-aaas-fellows/ (2016-02-13)
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  • AAAS | Newswire
    Friedman and Leslie B Vosshall have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow Election as a fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers More Tags AAAS Jeffrey M Friedman Laboratory of Molecular Genetics Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/aaas/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Laboratory of Molecular Genetics | Newswire
    remotely control biological targets in living animals rapidly without wires implants or drugs During a test they used radio waves or a magnetic field to turn on insulin production in mice More Tags BRAIN Initiative ferritin Jeffrey M Friedman Laboratory of Molecular Genetics magnetic field radio waves radiogenetics remote control Sarah Stanley September 21 2010 Awards and Honors Jeffrey M Friedman receives Albert Lasker Award for discovery of leptin This

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-molecular-genetics/ (2016-02-13)
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