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  • Research suggests how mosquitoes evolved an attraction to human scent | Newswire
    ago by looking at this little village in Kenya because the players are still there Vosshall says In 2009 Carolyn McBride who was a postdoc in Vosshall s laboratory at the time and her co investigators traveled to Rabai to see if these two groups still existed The team used turkey basters to collect larvae from tree holes in the forest and sieved larvae from clay pots and metal cans inside people s homes Back in the lab in New York they reared the insects and discovered that the observations that researchers had made years earlier seemed to hold true The insects collected indoors tended to be light brown and when given the option to bite humans or guinea pigs they mostly choose humans Those collected in the forest were black and tended to prefer the laboratory guinea pigs To zero in on the genes responsible for the human loving mosquitoes preference the researchers crossbred the mosquitoes creating thousands of genetically diverse grandchildren And then they sorted those mosquitoes based on their odor preference and compared the two groups We knew that these mosquitoes had evolved a love for the way we smell Vosshall says So she and her colleagues looked specifically for genes that had higher levels of expression in the human loving insects antennae These structures contain proteins called odorant receptors that pick up different scents Vosshall and her colleagues found 14 genes strongly linked to liking humans but one odor receptor gene Or4 stood out It s very highly expressed in human preferring mosquitoes Vosshall says The researchers guessed that Or4 must be detecting some aroma in human body odor To figure out which one they asked volunteers to wear pantyhose for 24 hours And then they placed those stinky stockings in a machine designed to separate

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/11/12/research-suggests-how-mosquitoes-evolved-an-attraction-to-human-scent/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Leslie Vosshall promoted to professor | Newswire
    mechanism by which the widely used insect repellent DEET blocks mosquitoes ability to locate their prey Recently her lab has expanded its scope to ask questions about how smell is linked to behavior both in insect models and in humans When the lab first started we were narrowly focused on the mission of describing the fly olfactory system finding all the chemosensory receptors that allow flies to smell odors carbon dioxide and pheromones mapping circuits into the brain figuring out how the insect chemosensory receptors worked at a functional level Vosshall says In recent years we have begun to ask more integrative questions involving the human sense of smell and also how innate insect behaviors like responding to smells finding food and having sex are modulated by internal physiological states We want to understand how the insect brain decides when to eat and when to stop eating whether that insect is a Drosophila fly looking for yeast growing on fruit or a hungry female Aedes mosquito looking for a human blood meal Vosshall who was originally inspired to study science by her uncle retired Syracuse University physiologist Philip Dunham chose neuroscience because it has allowed her to ask questions not only about physiology but about behavior and genetics She came to the university as a graduate student where she studied in Michael Young s laboratory and received her Ph D in 1993 She then did postdoctoral work at Columbia University in Richard Axel s lab but returned to the East Side a few years later becoming assistant professor at Rockefeller in 2000 She was promoted to associate professor in 2006 and was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator in 2008 Vosshall has been the recipient of awards from the John Merck Beckman and McKnight Foundations She received the 2002

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/05/17/leslie-vosshall-promoted-to-professor/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Leslie Vosshall, Paul Greengard win Dart/NYU biotech awards | Newswire
    of olfactory receptors that could be targets for novel insect repellents Dr Vosshall received her Ph D from Rockefeller in 1993 conducted postdoctoral training at Columbia University and returned to Rockefeller as assistant professor in 2000 She is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and a recipient of awards from the John Merck Beckman and McKnight Foundations She has also received the 2002 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers a 2005 New York City Mayor s Young Investigator Award for Excellence in Science and Technology a 2007 Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists and the 2009 Lawrence C Katz Prize from Duke University Dr Greengard Vincent Astor Professor was a recipient of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine which he earned for his contributions to understanding how neurotransmitters work His lab is devoted to discovering the molecular basis of communication between neurons in the mammalian brain the molecular defects responsible for various neurological and psychiatric disorders and the molecular mechanisms by which neuro and psychoactive drugs produce their actions He is being recognized with the Dart award for applied biotechnology A drug based on his research which is now in phase II clinical trials shows promise for the treatment of schizophrenia and sleep disorders associated with neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases Dr Greengard received his Ph D from The Johns Hopkins University He joined Rockefeller in 1983 and has been director of the Fisher Center for Alzheimer s Disease Research since 1995 He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards including the Metropolitan Life Foundation Award for Medical Research the Charles A Dana Award for Pioneering Achievements in Health the Ralph W Gerard Prize in Neuroscience from the Society for Neuroscience

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/04/06/leslie-vosshall-paul-greengard-win-dartnyu-biotech-awards/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Dart/NYU award | Newswire
    News Rockefeller bacteriologist wins Dart NYU Award Emil C Gotschlich head of Rockefeller University s Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis is one of three winners of this year s Dart NYU Biotechnology Achievement Awards Administered by the Biotechnology Study Center of New York University School of Medicine the Dart NYU Awards recognize the role of pure science in the development of pharmaceuticals and honor those scientists whose work has led to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/dartnyu-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Rockefeller postdoc wins GE & Science Prize | Newswire
    a doctoral student in the Columbia University laboratory of biochemist Richard Mann Crickmore s focus at Columbia was on how otherwise similar structures such as our fingers toes and ribs develop to different sizes Using Drosophila melanogaster as a model Crickmore examined the fly s large forewing and smaller hindwing and showed that the production and mobility of a growth promoting chemical known as Decapentaplegic are significantly different in the two wings directly affecting the sizes of the two tissues After receiving his Ph D in 2007 Crickmore came to Rockefeller where he currently focuses on the genetic underpinnings of size control He is also the recipient of a 2009 Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellowship and a 2007 Harold M Weintraub Graduate Student Award Since its establishment in 1995 the prize has recognized outstanding graduate students in the field of molecular biology Each year the grand prize winner receives 25 000 and runners up receive 5 000 each Past Rockefeller winners include Wenying Shou a former postdoctoral fellow in Stanislas Leibler s Laboratory of Living Matter in 2002 and Matthew L Albert a former graduate student in Robert B Darnell s Laboratory of Molecular Neuro oncology and Ralph M Steinman

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/12/04/rockefeller-postdoc-wins-ge-science-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • GE & Science Prize for Young Life Scientists | Newswire
    in the essay competition which recognizes outstanding graduate students in molecular biology Crickmore s essay titled The Molecular Basis of Size Differences comes with 25 000 and publication in Science More Tags GE Science Prize for Young Life Scientists Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Michael Crickmore Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/ge-science-prize-for-young-life-scientists/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Michael Crickmore | Newswire
    essay competition which recognizes outstanding graduate students in molecular biology Crickmore s essay titled The Molecular Basis of Size Differences comes with 25 000 and publication in Science More Tags GE Science Prize for Young Life Scientists Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Michael Crickmore Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/michael-crickmore/ (2016-02-13)
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  • In the News | Newswire
    relieves them of the fear of losing funding which research scientists elsewhere often face Neurobiologist Dr Leslie Vosshall says This is one of the few places on earth where you re given a cloistered environment to test crazy ideas and with plenty of support you don t have to worry about bringing in grant money Tags Leslie Vosshall newswire rockefeller edu Rockefeller University establishes 25 million fund for drug discovery

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/01/22/in-the-news-54/ (2016-02-13)
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