archive-edu.com » EDU » R » ROCKEFELLER.EDU

Total: 1631

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • In the News | Newswire
    going to have a really huge season of high populations of mosquitoes and so with that more disease transmission said Leslie Vosshall who runs Rockefeller University s Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior in New York City Along with her staff she s trying to find out exactly how mosquitoes hunt humans Tags Leslie Vosshall newswire rockefeller edu The Lancet 379 2500 June 30 2012 Sweat glands grown from newly identified

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/07/01/in-the-news-49/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • High blood pressure linked to gene regulation | Newswire
    pressure on a gene called the angiotensinogen gene which codes for a protein that helps regulate and maintain normal blood pressure In a study published this month in Human Heredity Jürg Ott head of the Laboratory of Statistical Genetics reports that in some subsets of the population a small area of DNA outside of the angiotensinogen gene plays an important role in its activity These changes which have now been linked to hypertension in African Americans and in Caucasian women increased the angiotensinogen gene s activity leading to more angiotensinogen protein in the blood One variation in particular appeared to more than double the risk of disease in African American men Hypertension is much more prevalent in the African American population says Ott head of Rockefeller University s Laboratory of Statistical Genetics However comparatively little work has been done to understand the genetics behind hypertension in this population These findings are just the tip of the iceberg and Ott says they show that the area of the gene responsible for regulating production of angiotensinogen is fertile ground for future hypertension research Human Heredity 60 2 89 96 2005 Tags gene regulation Jurg Ott newswire rockefeller edu Contact Kristine Kelly 212

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2005/10/31/high-blood-pressure-linked-to-gene-regulation/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Jurg Ott | Newswire
    can create a predisposition to hypertension More Tags gene regulation Jurg Ott March 10 2005 Science News Researchers identify gene that plays major role in age related blindness disease Scientists at Rockefeller University Yale University School of Public Health and the National Eye Institute have identified a gene that confers susceptibility to age related macular degeneration More Tags blindness Jurg Ott Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/jurg-ott/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Rockefeller University researchers identify protein that regulates RNA in nerve tissue | Newswire
    out can bind a segment of Nova 1 called the KH domain and inhibit the domain s interaction with RNA Researchers suspect that POMA patients profound motor dysfunction is caused at least in part by a direct inhibition of RNA binding by Nova 1 antibodies The Darnell lab found that the Nova 1 protein regulates RNA splicing in the nerve tissue of mammals When the protein is present and performing its role it directs alternative splicing of RNA in which certain segments of pre mRNA top are kept in the mRNA while other segments are discarded during the transfer Such cutting and stitching allows for translation to a wide diversity of proteins with very specific properties If Nova 1 is absent however RNA splicing is deregulated and the resulting protein s structure is changed Darnell s lab hypothesizes that this altered receptor function directly contributes to nerve cell death In a mouse model in which the gene encoding production of Nova 1 is deleted the animal exhibits signs of severe neuronal dysfunction including debilitating shaking and weakness These symptoms are present in patients with POMA Diagram by Kirk Jensen Nova s function Darnell s laboratory set out to understand Nova 1 s function and they focused on the protein s three KH domains the parts thought to bind RNA Using a technology known as SELEX Darnell and his colleagues were able to determine that Nova prefers to bind RNA stretches that contain repeats of the nucleic acid sequence UCAY Nucleic acids are the building blocks of DNA and RNA Upon learning this the scientists searched RNA databases for repeats of UCAY and zeroed in on a sequence found in a molecule called the inhibitory glycine receptor which contains several UCAY repeats The researchers hypothesized that Nova 1 was acting through this sequence in the glycine receptor to control alternative splicing Alternative splicing is a phenomenon that enables cells to produce a wide variety of proteins from a finite number of genes This capacity is essential for the development and operation of complex nervous systems such as those found in mammals The initial transcript of any gene known as pre mRNA is pieced together to produce a mature mRNA that can code for a protein In alternative splicing different pieces of this pre mRNA are stitched together to produce different mRNAs and thus different proteins To test their theory that Nova 1 regulates glycine receptor alternative splicing Kirk Jensen first author and postdoctoral fellow in the lab and his collaborators carried out two lines of studies one in cell cultures the other in animals In cell cultures they demonstrated that Nova 1 could control the alternative splicing of a glycine receptor mini gene Also Nova 1 would not bind with the glycine receptor if the UCAY sequence had been slightly altered This demonstrated that Nova regulated RNA specifically through UCAY sequences In the animal study the scientists generated and studied a special breed of mice known as knockout mice that lack

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2000/02/24/rockefeller-university-researchers-identify-protein-that-regulates-rna-in-nerve-tissue/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Albany Medical Center Prize awarded to James E. Darnell Jr. and Robert G. Roeder | Newswire
    from outside a cell to direct copying of RNA from specific DNA sites genes This work uncovered an important signaling route named the JAK STAT pathway Currently Darnell s lab studies how signals from the cell surface affect transcription of genes in the nucleus Darnell received his M D in 1955 from the Washington University School of Medicine In 1974 he joined Rockefeller as Vincent Astor Professor and from 1990 to 1991 he was vice president for academic affairs A member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1973 he has received numerous awards including the 2003 National Medal of Science the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science the 1997 Passano Award and the 1986 Gairdner Foundation International Award He is the coauthor with S E Luria of General Virology and the founding author with Harvey Lodish and David Baltimore of Molecular Cell Biology now in its sixth edition His book RNA Life s Indispensable Molecule was published in July 2011 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Robert G Roeder Roeder the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Professor began his career as a University of Washington graduate student where he discovered in 1969 that three enzymes called RNA polymerases play a role in gene transcription in animal cells In the late 1970s using purified polymerases and synthetic copies of genes he was successful in developing the first cell free systems to study transcription a scientific breakthrough that allowed scientists to recreate transcription in a test tube to better study the complex processes by which cells turn genes on and off More recently Roeder and his colleagues have begun to apply what they have learned in a test tube to the study of living cells Roeder received his Ph D in biochemistry in 1969 from the University of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/03/28/albany-medical-center-prize-awarded-to-james-e-darnell-jr-and-robert-g-roeder/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • James E. Darnell Jr. | Newswire
    eight American scientists to receive the award the nation s highest honor for lifetime achievement in fields of scientific research More Tags James E Darnell Jr National Medal of Science October 7 2002 Science News Wrong Proteins Targeted in Battle Against Cancer Researchers may be looking for novel cancer drugs in the wrong places says Rockefeller University Professor James E Darnell Jr M D in an article in this month s Nature Reviews Cancer More Tags James E Darnell Jr transcription factors September 22 2002 Science News Lasker Award Honors Rockefeller University s James Darnell James E Darnell Jr M D the pioneering researcher in the field of gene regulation who has nurtured the careers of over 100 young talented scientists was honored today with the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science More Tags James E Darnell Jr Lasker Award September 17 2002 Science News One gene two important proteins When the Human Genome Project first revealed last year that humans possess only an estimated 30 000 genes fives times more than a mustard weed plant the fact that many of our genes code for more than just one protein assumed greater importance Such protein variations researchers reasoned must play an even larger role than previously thought in contributing to the remarkable complexity of human beings More Tags James E Darnell Jr STAT February 1 2002 Science News Tidying Up Transcription Factors Fifty years ago in the early days of biology so little was known about the cell that all of the proteins outside of its nucleus were grouped into one big cytoplasmic soup Now as the list of known cellular ingredients continues to expand beyond the capacity of any recipe card two Rockefeller University scientists are taking a step back to ask whether there might

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/james-e-darnell-jr/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Robert G. Roeder to receive Salk Institute Medal for Research Excellence | Newswire
    human body Since 1969 when he made his initial groundbreaking discovery of the three protein machines responsible for reading human genes Roeder has gone on to elucidate the incredibly complex manner in which this vital process is orchestrated In the late 1970s Roeder developed cell free systems that allowed him and others to study the function of individual genes and transcription related proteins outside of living cells in effect recreating transcription in a test tube in a way that faithfully mimics the real process in cells More recently Roeder and his colleagues have begun to apply what they have learned in a test tube to the study of living cells Roeder received his Ph D in biochemistry in 1969 from the University of Washington Seattle where he worked with William Rutter He did postdoctoral work with Donald D Brown at the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1969 to 1971 He was a member of the faculty at the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis from 1971 until 1982 when he joined Rockefeller In 1985 he was named Arnold and Mabel Beckman Professor In addition to the Salk Medal Roeder has received the 2003 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award the 2002 ASBMB Merck Award the 2000 Gairdner Foundation International Award the 1999 Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize and the 1999 General Motors Cancer Research Foundation s Alfred P Sloan Prize He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences This year s medals will be awarded on October 29 as the concluding event of a Salk Nature Fondation IPSEN Symposium on Biological Complexity at the Salk Institute The Institute s medals were designed by the artist fashion designer and businesswoman Paloma Picasso best known for her dramatic jewelry designs She is the youngest daughter of Pablo Picasso and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/10/13/robert-g-roeder-to-receive-salk-institute-medal-for-research-excellence/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • RNA synthesis | Newswire
    Molecular Biology RNA synthesis Robert G Roeder Salk Institute s Medal for Research Excellence May 17 2002 Science News Three D images shed light on first steps of RNA synthesis The first three dimensional images of the initiating form of the molecular machinery in bacteria that transcribes genetic information from DNA into RNA the crucial first step for making proteins is reported in a pair of papers in the May

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/rna-synthesis/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive