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  • Gag | Newswire
    recently developed technique to capture how a viral protein Gag selectively extracts and packages viral RNA into the viral particles that exported to new cells More Tags Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center AIDS Gag Gag protein HIV Paul Bieniasz viral replication Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/gag/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeffrey Ravetch wins Wolf Prize in Medicine | Newswire
    from invaders and how a dysfunctional immune system attacks the body s own tissues Ravetch s award recognizes his studies of the heterogeneous effector function of antibody molecules and his documentation of the importance of diverse receptors for the constant Fc part of antibody molecules Ravetch has cloned many of these receptors for the immunoglobulin Fc region and has showed that they are important in mediating antibody function both in pathogenic disease and the body s normal state Jeff s work on Fc receptors has revealed critical knowledge of the molecular biology that underlies the immune system says Marc Tessier Lavigne the university s president By showing how antibodies communicate chemically with immune system cells his research is of great importance to the fight against both pathogenic disease and autoimmune disorders It is gratifying to see his pioneering work recognized with this prestigious international award Ravetch graduated from Yale University in 1973 and entered the Rockefeller University Cornell University M D Ph D program He received his Ph D in 1978 from The Rockefeller University where he studied under Norton Zinder and Peter Model and his M D from Cornell University Medical College in 1979 He completed his postdoctoral research at the National Institutes of Health with Philip Leder where he cloned the immunoglobulin heavy chain genes and began his career long interest in antibody function In 1982 Ravetch joined the faculty of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and in 1984 also became a guest investigator in Rockefeller s Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology He returned to Rockefeller in 1996 as professor and head of laboratory and was named Theresa and Eugene M Lang Professor in 1997 Ravetch s previous awards include the Canada Gairdner International Award in 2012 the Coley Award from the Cancer Research Institute in 2007

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/02/02/jeffrey-ravetch-wins-wolf-prize-in-medicine/ (2016-02-13)
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  • immune system | Newswire
    medicine the Wolf Prize recognizes Ravetch s work on the molecular basis of the immune response including the Fc receptor system that mediates antibody function in disease and health More Tags Fc receptors immune system Jeffrey Ravetch Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology Wolf Prize Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/immune-system/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Latent HIV may lurk in ‘quiet’ immune cells, research suggests | Newswire
    active infection hijacking the cell to produce more copies of itself in order infect other cells and killing it in the process Antiretroviral drugs that suppress HIV infection work by disrupting this hijacking But the virus may also fail to produce an active infection remaining a quiet tiny fragment of DNA tucked within the host cell s genome If so the drugs have nothing to disrupt and the infection remains latent Most often however what happens is actually something in between While the virus does manage to get at least some of itself into the T cell s genome problems with the process leave it incapable of hijacking the cell to replicate itself But those few successful integrations still do damage and the resulting depletion in the victim s immune system leaves him or her vulnerable to potentially fatal opportunistic infections years or even decades after the initial infection If a patient stops taking antiretrovirals the infection rebounds It is truly amazing that the virus can give rise to AIDS 20 years after the initial infection says Cohn Researchers think the reservoir of latent virus may be hiding out in a type of CD4 T cell long lived memory cells that help the immune system remember particular pathogens When these cells encounter a pathogen they have previously seen they spur the proliferation of T cells tuned to recognize it in a process called clonal expansion Prior research has suggested clonal expansion is crucial to maintaining HIV s latent reservoir Following up on work initiated by Mila Jankovic a senior research associate in the lab Cohn and her colleagues examined cloned and unique CD4 T cells in blood samples from 13 people infected with HIV An analytical computational technique developed by Israel Tojal da Silva a research associate in the lab

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/01/30/latent-hiv-may-lurk-in-quiet-immune-cells-research-suggests/ (2016-02-13)
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  • CD4 T cell | Newswire
    integrated into the genomes of infected CD4 T cells they found evidence dormant but dangerous HIV was hiding out in cells that had never been copied not the more abundant cloned cells More Tags CD4 T cell clonal expansion Laboratory of Molecular Immunology latent HIV Lillian Cohn Michel Nussenzweig viral integration Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/cd4-t-cell/ (2016-02-13)
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  • clonal expansion | Newswire
    into the genomes of infected CD4 T cells they found evidence dormant but dangerous HIV was hiding out in cells that had never been copied not the more abundant cloned cells More Tags CD4 T cell clonal expansion Laboratory of Molecular Immunology latent HIV Lillian Cohn Michel Nussenzweig viral integration Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/clonal-expansion/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Long-acting drug effectively prevents HIV-like infection in monkeys | Newswire
    that could improve adherence by making it possible to receive the drug by injection once every three months Developed by ViiV Healthcare and GlaxoSmithKline and previously known as GSK744 LA cabotegravir is an antiretroviral drug Antiretrovirals interfere with HIV s ability to replicate itself using a host cell and they are used to treat an HIV infection or to prevent those at high risk from acquiring it in the first place Cabotegravir belongs to a group of antiretrovirals that target integrase an enzyme the virus uses to integrate itself into the cell s genome This compound is a relative of an already FDA approved integrase inhibitor dolutegravir but with chemical properties that allow it to be formulated into a long acting suspension for injection A previous study by the ADARC and Rockefeller team in collaboration with ViiV Healthcare and GSK found long acting cabotegravir could protect male rhesus macaque monkeys from exposure to a virus related to HIV Following up on these results a phase 2 clinical trial is now underway in a group of 120 men at low risk of infection Before cabotegravir s effectiveness in high risk individuals can be tested trials must show that study participants tolerate the drug well and find the quarterly injections which are a novel approach to HIV prevention acceptable Both new animal studies were conducted with women in mind in 2013 women accounted for 47 percent of new HIV infections worldwide according to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS Working separately two teams tested the drug s ability to block vaginal transmission in two species of monkeys with different breeding cycles and susceptibility to infection First author Chasity Andrews a postdoctoral fellow at ADARC and Rockefeller and colleagues at ADARC the Tulane Regional Primate Center and ViiV GSK studied

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/01/15/long-acting-drug-effectively-prevents-hiv-like-infection-in-monkeys/ (2016-02-13)
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  • antiretroviral | Newswire
    one injection every three months researchers hope this new drug which has begun clinical testing could improve some patients ability to take HIV prevention medication properly More Tags Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center antiretroviral cabotegravir Chasity Andrews clinical trial GlaxoSmithKline HIV Martin Markowitz ViiV Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/antiretroviral/ (2016-02-13)
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