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  • Rockefeller researchers receive $10 million grant to study how molecules interact within cells | Newswire
    Structural Biology at Rockefeller It is for these reasons that the proteomic revolution still lags behind the genomic revolution Here we seek to revolutionize proteomics by synergistically combining improvements in established techniques with new approaches to studying protein protein interactions known as the interactome The newly funded center is part of the New Pathways of Discovery initiative from the National Institutes of Health s Roadmap for Medical Research Researchers funded through this initiative are focusing on the development of new technologies to accelerate discovery and facilitate comprehensive study of biological pathways and networks One of the central components of such networks is the set of proteins encoded by an organism s DNA commonly referred to as the proteome Rout s laboratory has focused on the nuclear pore complex A massive complex of proteins the nuclear pore complex serves as a checkpoint between the cell s nucleus and the surrounding soupy cytoplasm inside the cell Small molecules can freely enter and exit the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex but larger proteins and RNA molecules are allowed entry selectively In 2000 Rout and Rockefeller University s Brian Chait a leader in developing mass spectrometry techniques published the first complete inventory of the proteins in the yeast nuclear pore complex showing that just 30 proteins make up the structure Since then Rout and Chait have been collaborating with UCSF s Andrej Sali a structural biologist to visualize what the nuclear pore complex looks like The goal of the team that Rout leads is to create new tools to study large complex macromolecular assemblies such as the nuclear pore complex and their dynamics Because these assemblies are difficult to visualize using traditional methods Rout and his team rely on computational methods to visualize their structures allowing the team to study how specific sub

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2005/10/06/rockefeller-researchers-receive-10-million-grant-to-study-how-molecules-interact-within-cells/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Michael P. Rout | Newswire
    where proteins occur within cells can now be used to study how those proteins interact with one another The new technique developed by Rockefeller scientists establishes a simple and rapid method that can be applied to any protein that has been previously linked to GFP More Tags GFP Michael P Rout October 6 2005 Grants and Gifts Rockefeller researchers receive 10 million grant to study how molecules interact within cells The National Center for Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health announced this week that Rockefeller s Michael P Rout will be a recipient of a five year 10 million grant to study how molecules interact with one another within and between cells More Tags Michael P Rout National Center for Research Resources National Institutes of Health November 5 2004 Science News Crucial evolutionary link Molecular sculptor may have molded simple ancient bacterial cells into modern highly structured cells A team of researchers led by Rockefeller University s Michael P Rout Ph D have discovered a possible crucial evolutionary link between the simple cells that make up bacteria and the more complex cells that comprise animal and plant cells including those of humans More Tags Michael P Rout nuclear

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/michael-p-rout/ (2016-02-13)
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  • National Center for Research Resources | Newswire
    at the National Institutes of Health announced this week that Rockefeller s Michael P Rout will be a recipient of a five year 10 million grant to study how molecules interact with one another within and between cells More Tags Michael P Rout National Center for Research Resources National Institutes of Health Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/national-center-for-research-resources/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newswire
    Alzheimer s disease is a common form of dementia with symptoms affecting memory thinking and behavior Leptin Leptin is a hormonal signal made by the body s fat cells that regulates food intake and energy expenditure and plays a key role in regulating appetite and body weight Stem cells Stem cells are uniquely versatile cells that retain the ability to replicate indefinitely through cell division and to differentiate into specialized cell types Biochemistry Structural Biology and Chemistry Nuclear pore complex The nuclear pore complex is a protein assembly found in the membrane surrounding the cell nucleus Small RNAs Short snippets of RNA ranging from about 21 to 26 nucleotides in length that silence gene expression Neuroscience Alzheimer s disease Alzheimer s disease is a common form of dementia with symptoms affecting memory thinking and behavior Stem cells Stem cells are uniquely versatile cells that retain the ability to replicate indefinitely through cell division and to differentiate into specialized cell types Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology Apoptosis The programmed death of cells a critical mechanism by which aging and sick cells make way for new healthy ones Small RNAs Short snippets of RNA ranging from about 21 to 26 nucleotides in

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/topics/?s=ra (2016-02-13)
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  • Newswire
    at Rockefeller work to elucidate the processes underlying Alzheimer s Paul Greengard who won the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for research into how neurons communicate recently discovered how blockbuster cancer drug Gleevec binds to a protein that stimulates the production of amyloid β the protein that makes up the Alzheimer s plaques The development of a molecule with similar activity that can cross the blood brain barrier unlike Gleevec represents a potential new anti amyloid therapy for Alzheimer s Greengard and Nathaniel Heinz developed a technique called TRAP that can identify all of the proteins produced by a given cell type which is being applied to understand how Alzheimer s and other diseases operate at a finer level of detail than previously possible And Jeffrey Ravetch has identified a marker in the blood that could help doctors determine an individual s predisposition to Alzheimer s which could enable early intervention once effective therapies are discovered Recent research at Rockefeller has also focused on the less studied vascular component of the disease Sidney Strickland has found that a clotting agent in the blood called fibrinogen interacts with the plaques creating blood clots that are harder than usual to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/topics/alzheimers/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newswire
    as those that would otherwise form webbing between human fingers and toes are programmed to die and in the tuning and trimming of the nervous system The cellular machinery that supports this capability for self destruction is ever present and to stay alive cells require the activity of teams of inhibitor molecules that prevent apoptosis from occurring prematurely Researchers have found that it is possible to block the activity of these inhibition of apoptosis IAP proteins thereby triggering cell death Studying apoptosis in fruit flies Rockefeller s Hermann Steller identified a protein named Reaper in 1994 that works with several other molecules including Grim and Hid to interfere with the protective activity of IAPs thereby taking the brakes off of apoptosis Related molecules are found in humans and scientists are working to develop small molecule IAP antagonists that may be able to fight tumors Several additional Rockefeller scientists are also working to better understand apoptosis Sanford Simon has used single cell microscopy to reveal an unsuspected order to what was thought to be the random timing or sudden collapse of cells undergoing apoptosis Shai Shaham has found a new type of programmed cell death that doesn t rely on the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/topics/apoptosis/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newswire
    as rapid reaction to infection and also adaptive immune responses which are developed over days or weeks and have a durable memory so that they can be deployed against similar threats in the future In the cases of allergies autoimmunity and transplant rejection dendritic cells instigate responses that cause disease and they can also be exploited by infections or cancers to evade immunity Current research is exploring how to best harness the power of dendritic cells in therapies for a wide variety of conditions The discovery of dendritic cells from the Greek word dendron or tree was published in 1973 by Rockefeller University scientists Ralph M Steinman and Zanvil A Cohn in the Journal of Experimental Medicine The cells were named for their distinctive probing arboreal shape Steinman and colleagues have since established dendritic cells as the sentinel cells of the immune system initiating the immune response and orchestrating the interactions of more than a dozen types of immune system cells They have been found in the lining of the nose and throat and in the brain and arteries and heart valves among other places Hundreds of laboratories around the world now focus on the basic biology and clinical applications

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/topics/dendriticcells/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newswire
    highly constrained structure called chromatin Poking through this tightly folded complex are long flexible proteins the histone tails Rockefeller s C David Allis has been a leader in the field of epigenetics In 2000 Allis and Brian Strahl first proposed what has now been referred to as the histone code According to their hypothesis chemical modifications of the histone tails play a vital role in determining which genes are turned on or off These modifications which attach certain chemical groups to specific amino acids the building blocks of proteins on the histone tails act like flags to direct the docking of other important proteins some of which open up the tightly wrapped DNA providing access to genes Research by Allis and his colleagues at Rockefeller has identified a number of enzymes that read write and erase the histone code The findings have broadened our understanding of how embryos develop and how diseases such as cancer arise Scientists at Rockefeller have shown that histone modifications play crucial roles in mental retardation and drug addiction and they guide the development and differentiation of epidermal skin stem cells in mouse embryos which temper the development of the skin barrier Rockefeller researchers have mapped

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/topics/epigenetics/ (2016-02-13)
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