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  • 2009 | Newswire
    piece of CagA a bacterial protein that impersonates a human protein in order to disable a key enzyme More Tags Brian T Chait C Erec Stebbins Laboratory of Mass Spectrometry and Gaseous Ion Chemistry Laboratory of Structural Microbiology December 8 2009 Science News New molecule identified in DNA damage response Evolution places the highest premium on reproduction natural selection s only standard for biological success In the case of replicating cells life spares no expense to ensure that the offspring is a faithful copy of the parent Researchers have identified a new player in this elaborate system of quality control a gene whose mutation can cause a rare but lethal disease More Tags Brian T Chait Hironori Funabiki Laboratory of Chromosome and Cell Biology Laboratory of Mass Spectrometry and Gaseous Ion Chemistry December 4 2009 Science News Elusive protein points to mechanism behind hearing loss A serendipitous discovery in zebra fish larvae born deaf has helped narrow down the function of an elusive protein necessary for hearing and balance In addition to unveiling a potential target for therapy the work suggests that hearing loss may arise from a faulty pathway that translates sound into electrical nerve impulses the brain can understand More Tags A James Hudspeth Laboratory of Sensory Neuroscience December 4 2009 Awards and Honors Rockefeller postdoc wins GE Science Prize Michael Crickmore has been named Grand Prize winner in the essay competition which recognizes outstanding graduate students in molecular biology Crickmore s essay titled The Molecular Basis of Size Differences comes with 25 000 and publication in Science More Tags GE Science Prize for Young Life Scientists Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Michael Crickmore December 2 2009 Science News Rockefeller human embryonic stem cell lines now available through NIH registry Two human embryonic stem cell lines derived using private funds are among the first 13 human embryonic stem cell lines for use in NIH funded research under the NIH Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research adopted in July 2009 More Tags Ali H Brivanlou Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Laboratory of Molecular Vertebrate Embryology November 23 2009 Science News Acute stress leaves epigenetic marks on the hippocampus Scientists are learning that the dynamic regulation of genes as much as the genes themselves shapes the fate of organisms Now the discovery of a new epigenetic mechanism regulating genes in the brain under stress is helping change the way scientists think about psychiatric disorders and could open new avenues to treatment More Tags Bruce S McEwen Donald W Pfaff Harold and Margaret Milliken Hatch Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology Richard Hunter November 19 2009 Science News Scientists identify DNA that regulates antibody production When foreign invaders trip the immune system s alarm antibodies need to be specially sculpted to attack them head on New research now shows that gene segments called enhancers control the reshuffling of antibody genes that makes such a precise and coordinated attack possible More Tags F Nina Papavasiliou Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology Nathaniel Heintz Peter Model

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/ (2016-02-13)
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  • 2008 | Newswire
    strains of bacteria inject virulent teams of molecules into cells that prepare the way for bacteria to invade the cells and reproduce spreading disease Different types of these molecules called virulence factors wreak havoc in cells basic functioning in different ways Now using x ray crystallography researchers at The Rockefeller University have revealed the structure of one such molecule that has the especially damaging effect of arresting its host cells division The finding offers clues as to how this bacterial weapon works and potentially how to defend against it or even use it to attack cancer More Tags C Erec Stebbins E Coli November 26 2008 Science News Research identifies cell receptor as target for anti inflammatory immune response A common treatment for autoimmune diseases intravenous immunoglobulin or IVIG has defied scientific explanation for years But researchers at The Rockefeller University have homed in on a specialized cell receptor in the immune system that facilitates IVIG s work suggesting a target for new potential anti inflammatory agents More Tags Jeffrey Ravetch November 18 2008 Awards and Honors Tom Muir Paul Nurse honored at Science and the City Gala The New York Academy of Sciences has honored Rockefeller University professor Tom W Muir with a Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists and also presented Rockefeller president Paul Nurse with a Science and the City Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in New York City More Tags Paul Nurse November 13 2008 Science News Breakthrough in cell type analysis offers new way to study development and disease It s sometimes said that disease does not discriminate but that s not true Many diseases are very particular about the types of cells they attack laying waste to one population while sparing its nearly identical neighbors for no apparent reason New research from The Rockefeller University for the first time enables scientists to carefully study the biomolecular differences among types of cells in order to learn what makes some susceptible to attack and others resistant More Tags Nathaniel Heintz Paul Greengard TRAP method November 10 2008 Science News Fatty diet during pregnancy produces new neurons to fetal brain A study in rats shows that exposure to a high fat diet during pregnancy produces permanent changes in the offspring s brain that lead to overeating and obesity early in life according to new research by Rockefeller University scientists More Tags Sarah F Leibowitz November 6 2008 Science News Scientists confirm a molecular clipping mechanism behind stem cell development Some genes are regulated through a process by which proteins in the cell nucleus called histones are chemically modified by small chemical marks New research from Rockefeller University scientists shows that during specific stages of differentiation in mouse embryonic stem cells crucial marks can be removed by cutting off the end of the histone s tail More Tags C David Allis histone code November 6 2008 Science News Researchers find new path to antibiotics in dirt The bacteria teeming in the earth s soil produce some of the most powerful

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  • 2007 | Newswire
    food and other flies that are experiencing stress While the structure and function of the neurons that pick up the sensory signals and send them to the brain remain unaltered those that communicate between the two show significant changes in function and confer neural plasticity onto the fly brain More Tags glomerulus Leslie B Vosshall olfactory November 30 2007 Science News Rendering of ion channel suggests how neurons fire When a nerve cell fires membrane proteins known as voltage dependent ion channels open to allow the flow of charged atoms called ions across the cell membrane The opening of voltage dependent ion channels is mediated by voltage sensors which contain charged amino acids that move within the membrane in response to voltage changes Now new research from Rockefeller University reveals how these charged amino acids are stabilized on voltage sensor paddles and how they move within the lipid membrane More Tags ion channel Roderick MacKinnon November 30 2007 Science News Multi lab collaboration yields first detailed map of nuclear pore complex The pores that lead into a cell s nucleus play an incredibly important role in the cell s metabolism and signaling Now Rockefeller University researchers have drafted a protein by protein map of the nuclear pore complex s structure providing a glimpse into the evolution of the nucleus itself More Tags Leslie B Vosshall nuclear pore complex November 29 2007 Science News Data suggest community involvement is the key to controlling infectious disease The battles against infectious diseases are challenging enough in Western countries with stable infrastructure and deep pocketed pharmaceutical firms In an impoverished section of Latin America they are much more difficult But new research from Rockefeller University s Joel E Cohen suggests that the key to managing insect borne illnesses in developing areas is a technologically simple humanly sophisticated approach of sustained community outreach More Tags Chagas disease Joel E Cohen November 28 2007 Science News Recently discovered cell is unexpected player in psoriasis The psoriasis drug etanercept has had a high success rate but its mechanism was largely unknown Now by studying patients immune reaction to the drug Rockefeller University researchers have found that a newly discovered immune cell the Th17 cell may be playing an unexpected role in the disease More Tags James G Krueger psoriasis November 19 2007 Science News Stress response in the brain relies on a blood thinning protein Our ability to learn from stressful situations allows us to try to avoid them in the future New research by Rockefeller University scientists shows that a protein called tPA in the hippocampus a region of the brain responsible for memory learning and fear plays an essential role in this learned fear response and could be involved in depression More Tags Sidney Strickland Stress November 13 2007 Science News A protein converts immune cells to tumor killers Increasingly vaccines are not only being used to preempt viruses they are being developed to fight cancer With a single injection of a protein that is

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  • 2006 | Newswire
    Science News Viral gene hijacks small RNA pathway as a counter attack strategy Every day plants are battling for survival against tiny viruses invading their cells Small RNAs are a major part of the plant s immune system but viruses have devised counter attack molecules that disable this line of defense Research from Nam Hai Chua s laboratory has found a new mechanism for how a viral molecule causes the breakdown of the plant s defense system More Tags MicroRNAs Nam Hai Chua PTGS December 7 2006 Awards and Honors Lederberg receives Presidential Medal of Freedom President Emeritus Joshua Lederberg a Nobel laureate who has served as an adviser to nine U S presidential administrations receives the nation s highest civilian award More Tags Joshua Lederberg Presidential Medal of Freedom December 6 2006 Science News Ion channels are key to estrogen s effect on neurons Despite being one of the body s best studied hormones there s still a lot we don t know about estrogens Now by studying how these sex hormones impact brain cells at the biophysical level scientists at Rockefeller University say they exert their powerful effects on behavior in part by affecting the speed at which ion channels in the cell membrane of a neuron open and close More Tags Donald W Pfaff ion channel December 4 2006 Science News Measuring awareness is not as simple as a single number Science fiction describes the crucial difference between a robot and a person as sense of self But for Rockefeller University s George Reeke computers self or no self do not yet begin to capture the complexity of the human mind A new article by Reeke and his colleagues applies a theory developed by Gerald Edelman formerly at Rockefeller and now at The Neurosciences Institute in San Diego to suggest that thinking of the brain as a computer is a dangerous oversimplification The scientists propose that consciousness exists as a dynamic process that cannot be programmed in silicon More Tags awareness George Reeke December 4 2006 Science News HIV 1 kills immune cells in the gut that may never bounce back People with HIV have been living longer healthier lives since the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy or HAART in 1995 In fact most patients on the drug regimen do so well that according to blood tests their immune cells appear to return to pre HIV levels But two new studies from Rockefeller University and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center show that within the gastrointestinal tract recovery of immune cells is incomplete despite years of prolonged treatment suggesting the need for additional ways to monitor immune system health and the need for hypervigilance as HIV positive patients live into their forties fifties sixties and beyond More Tags HIV Martin Markowitz December 1 2006 Science News Newly discovered class of small RNAs is specifically to reproductive cells One size does not fit all when it comes to RNA Scientists have now discovered a new player among

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  • 2005 | Newswire
    called tissue plasminogen activator or tPA More Tags Bruce S McEwen Sidney Strickland Stress December 2 2005 Science News Immune cell receptors act in combination to regulate attack Not all antibodies are created equal and Rockefeller researchers have just pinned down one reason why Each one activates different combinations of receptors on an immune cell s surface and only one combination results in the most effective immune response More Tags cell receptors IgG Jeffrey Ravetch December 2 2005 Awards and Honors Two Rockefeller postdocs receive funding for research at the scientific interface Nicolas E Buchler and Edo L Kussell have received 2006 Career Awards at the Scientific Interface from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund The two scientists will receive 500 000 to assist in the transition to becoming independent investigators More Tags Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award Edo L Kussell Nicolas E Buchler November 29 2005 Science News Scientists say toxins use their shape to wreak havoc on cells Last year Rockefeller University scientists used X ray crystallography to determine the structure of a widespread bacterial toxin called CDT Now the researchers have taken an even closer look at its configuration to gain a better understanding of what makes this potential carcinogen so effective More Tags C Erec Stebbins CDT toxins November 23 2005 Science News Building a better vaccine By studying how the yellow fever vaccine creates a potent lifelong immunity after a single shot Rockefeller scientists say they could unlock secrets that will help design new vaccines to target not only the influenza virus but perhaps other infectious diseases such as HIV or hepatitis C More Tags Charles M Rice vaccines November 23 2005 Science News From primordial soup to cells Biophysicist Albert Libchaber and colleagues at Rockefeller University have been getting closer over the past few years to identifying what are the bare minimum components of a cell and this month they announce new progress More Tags Albert J Libchaber bioreactor November 18 2005 Science News New report bolsters theory on ear s inner amplifier Two competing theories exist to explain how the human ear amplifies sound Now using ear hair cells from a bullfrog scientists at Rockefeller provide evidence to bolster the theory they proposed in 1998 More Tags A James Hudspeth cochlea stereocilia November 14 2005 Science News Reversing sugar s effect on the brain New research on diabetes shows that the brain s memory center is one target of uncontrolled high blood sugar and that the effects on it may be reversible More Tags Bruce S McEwen diabetes November 10 2005 Science News Scientists teach worms to learn Worms like people tend to avoid foods that have made them sick in the past By coaxing worms to select only healthy choices from a menu of bacteria Rockefeller scientists show that one brain chemical serotonin helps cement behavior More Tags Cori Bargmann November 10 2005 Science News Application deadline for faculty search is next week Scientists interested in tenure track faculty positions in the biological and

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  • 2004 | Newswire
    insects ability to detect odors depends on a single gene Fruit flies lacking the gene known as Or83b cannot smell More Tags Leslie B Vosshall olfactory September 2 2004 Science News Silencing human gene through new science of epigenetics Gene associated with human development and cancer For the first time scientists have shown how the activity of a gene associated with normal human development as well as the occurrence of cancer and several other diseases is repressed epigenetically by modifying not the DNA code of a gene but instead the spool like histone proteins around which DNA tightly wraps itself in the nucleus of cells in the body More Tags C David Allis National Institutes of Health PAD September 2 2004 Science News Single isolated mouse skin cell can generate into variety of epidermal tissues Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University have isolated stem cells from the skin of a mouse and showed for the first time that an individual stem cell can renew itself in the laboratory and then be used in grafts to produce skin hair and oil glands More Tags Elaine Fuchs skin stem cells August 23 2004 Science News Genome destroyer identified in the immune system Our bodies have such great capacity to heal it s hard to imagine that we naturally manufacture a product in our immune system that can endanger our own DNA and provide a biological footstep to cancer But this is precisely the case More Tags AID Michel C Nussenzweig August 20 2004 Science News Hormone replacement therapy one hour at a time Giving hormone doses in pulses rather than as a steady exposure may maximize the benefits and limit the side effects now associated with hormone therapies This is one implication of the findings scientists at Rockefeller University report in the August 17 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences More Tags Donald W Pfaff hormone therapy August 20 2004 Science News Viral locksmith is caught in the act How does the molecular machine responsible for activating genes choose which gene to switch on from among the 30 000 genes contained in each cell of the human body In the August 4 issue of the EMBO Journal researchers at Rockefeller University report that they are beginning to answer that question in bacteria and the answers are not only surprising but may also aid in the development of powerful new antibiotics More Tags antibiotics Milton H Werner August 3 2004 Campus News Rockefeller University establishes stem cell research center With the support of a 5 million endowment donated by New York City philanthropist Harriet Heilbrunn The Rockefeller University has established the Robert and Harriet Heilbrunn Center for Stem Cell Research More Tags Harriet Heilbrunn stem cells July 30 2004 Science News Through population screening on the island of Kosrae Rockefeller scientists discover a mutant gene that controls dietary cholesterol absorption Using DNA from 1 000 inhabitants of the Micronesian island of Kosrae Rockefeller University

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  • 2003 | Newswire
    disease RNA often thought of as merely the chemical messenger that helps decode DNA s genetic instructions for making proteins can itself play a crucial role in regulating protein expression Not surprisingly this regulation occurs through proteins that bind to RNA All cells in the body especially nerve cells in the brain use and regulate RNA in an exquisite fashion More Tags CLIP micro Robert B Darnell October 31 2003 Science News Giant protein organizes the transportation railway system within cells To get its job done each cell in the human body must constantly change its inner skeleton and therefore its outer shape This skeleton also serves as a vast network of tracks which grow and shrink and move in different directions as needed to transport proteins and other materials within the cell and to organize cells within a tissue or organ More Tags ACF7 Elaine Fuchs October 29 2003 Science News GenSAT Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas Project announced For scientists studying the brain this week s Nature announces a remarkable new map describing previously uncharted territory plus the means of exploring the new horizons for themselves Rockefeller University scientists led by Nat Heintz Ph D and Mary Beth Hatten Ph D are well under way on a genetic atlas of the mammalian brain that provides unprecedented access to central nervous system regions cell classes and pathways More Tags Gensat Mary E Hatten Nathaniel Heintz October 28 2003 Science News Gene therapy in worms identifies protein that plays role in controlling water balance sense of touch in live animals Using knockout mice and mutant roundworms researchers at The Rockefeller University and the University of California San Francisco have identified a protein that helps control water balance in the body and underlies the sensation of touch functions basic to life that have long eluded explanation More Tags gene therapy Jeffrey M Friedman TRPV4 October 23 2003 Science News Improving the body s homeland security against TB The microbe that causes tuberculosis operates the way a human terrorist would With minimal resources the TB bacterium skillfully blends in and gains strength before lashing out unexpectedly Now Rockefeller scientists John MacMicking Ph D and John McKinney Ph D have discovered a unique way the immune system can disarm the bacterial offender If this defense could be strengthened TB could be brought to biological justice More Tags John MacMicking tuberculosis October 22 2003 Science News White House Awards National Medal of Science to Rockefeller University s James Darnell James E Darnell Jr M D a pioneering researcher in the field of gene regulation will receive the National Medal of Science the White House announced today Darnell is among eight American scientists to receive the award the nation s highest honor for lifetime achievement in fields of scientific research More Tags James E Darnell Jr National Medal of Science October 8 2003 Science News Nobel Prize honors Rockefeller University scientist Roderick MacKinnon for revealing process of electrical signaling in humans and other living organisms

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  • 2002 | Newswire
    T cells to inhibit HIV More Tags David D Ho defensis September 22 2002 Science News Lasker Award Honors Rockefeller University s James Darnell James E Darnell Jr M D the pioneering researcher in the field of gene regulation who has nurtured the careers of over 100 young talented scientists was honored today with the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science More Tags James E Darnell Jr Lasker Award September 17 2002 Science News One gene two important proteins When the Human Genome Project first revealed last year that humans possess only an estimated 30 000 genes fives times more than a mustard weed plant the fact that many of our genes code for more than just one protein assumed greater importance Such protein variations researchers reasoned must play an even larger role than previously thought in contributing to the remarkable complexity of human beings More Tags James E Darnell Jr STAT September 4 2002 Science News Rockefeller researchers provide the first functional evidence for mammalian pheromone receptors Pheromones chemical signals that influence social and reproductive behaviors have been studied since the 1950s but the molecules in the mammalian nervous system that actually detect pheromones have remained elusive More Tags Peter Mombaerts pheromones September 3 2002 Science News Dinosaur ancestor s vision possibly nocturnal Call it Triassic Park with statistics instead of amber preserved DNA researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University and Yale University recreated in the test tube a functional pigment that would have characterized the eyes of archosaurs ruling reptiles and allowed these direct ancestors to dinosaurs to see in dim light More Tags dinosaur rhodopsin Thomas P Sakmar August 21 2002 Science News Natural born killers enlisted to fight anthrax Researchers at The Rockefeller University have hit upon a promising method for rapidly and effectively treating people infected with the deadly anthrax bacterium including feared drug resistant strains The new research reported in the August 22 issue of Nature takes advantage of anthrax s number one natural enemy bateriophage or bacteria eating viruses More Tags Anthrax bacteriophage Vincent Fischetti August 14 2002 Science News Pivotal Brain Processor Decreased in Schizophrenia New York NY August 14 2002 Levels of a pivotal signal processor in the brain are reduced significantly in people with schizophrenia a study by scientists at The Rockefeller University Weill Cornell Medical College and University of California at Irvine has found More Tags DARPP 32 Paul Greengard schizophrenia August 1 2002 Science News What inspires yeast cells to divide Often in science a novel set of experiments comes along that forces researchers to abandon old models in exchange for new ones that better fit their observations This is the case in a new Nature report by Rockefeller University researchers which finds that past models of cellular division in the simple yeast organism were focused on the wrong protein More Tags cell division Frederick R Cross July 10 2002 Science News Researchers discover molecular switch that tells body

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