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  • cellular noise | Newswire
    smoothly operating factory that is the cell tiny molecular machines carry out their tasks with order and certainty Or at least that s what many scientists once believed More Tags cellular noise Eric Siggia noise Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University RU Footer The Rockefeller University 1230

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/cellular-noise/ (2016-02-13)
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  • noise | Newswire
    smoothly operating factory that is the cell tiny molecular machines carry out their tasks with order and certainty Or at least that s what many scientists once believed More Tags cellular noise Eric Siggia noise Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University RU Footer The Rockefeller University 1230

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/noise/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Michael W. Young receives Massry Prize | Newswire
    regulate circadian rhythms in a model organism the fruit fly and how they function have markedly influenced our knowledge of how the human body works including shedding light on how sleep is regulated and the basis of human sleep disorders says Marc Tessier Lavigne Rockefeller s president Their work is an example of how basic research in science can be translated to new insights in physiology and human health and this prize is the latest in a number of recent honors to recognize Young s outstanding work Young s work spans nearly three decades of research on the biological clocks that regulate our bodies patterns of sleep and wakefulness metabolism and response to disease By studying Drosophila melanogaster commonly known as the fruit fly Young s lab discovered the majority of the genes that regulate the fly s circadian clock Young s findings have the potential to help individuals suffering from sleep and mood disorders as well as dysfunctions related to the timing of gene activities in visual function locomotion metabolism learning and memory Recently research in the Young laboratory has looked at circadian rhythms at the genetic and molecular levels in humans with certain sleep and depressive disorders Young received his undergraduate degree in biology in 1971 and his Ph D in genetics in 1975 both from The University of Texas Austin Following postdoctoral work in biochemistry at the Stanford University School of Medicine he was appointed assistant professor at Rockefeller in 1978 as part of The Rockefeller University Fellows Program and was named associate professor in 1984 and professor in 1988 He was named the university s vice president for academic affairs and Richard and Jeanne Fisher Professor in 2004 He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/08/23/michael-w-young-receives-massry-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeffrey V. Ravetch and Michael W. Young to receive Canada Gairdner International Awards | Newswire
    on the functions of antibodies pave the way toward developing therapies for autoimmune diseases like lupus and arthritis as well as cancer and infectious diseases Ravetch graduated from Yale University in 1973 and received his Ph D in 1978 from The Rockefeller University He received his M D from Cornell University Medical College in 1979 and completed his postdoctoral research at the National Institutes of Health After serving on the faculty of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Ravetch was appointed professor at Rockefeller in 1996 and named Theresa and Eugene M Lang Professor in 1997 Ravetch is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine His previous awards include the Coley Award from the Cancer Research Institute in 2007 the American Association of Immunologists Huang Foundation Meritorious Career Award in 2005 and the Lee C Howley Sr Prize for Arthritis Research in 2004 Young who shares the prize with Jeffrey C Hall and Michael Rosbash of Brandeis University is being honored for his nearly three decades of research on circadian rhythms the biological clocks that regulate our bodies patterns of sleep and wakefulness metabolism and response to disease By studying Drosophila melanogaster commonly known as the fruit fly Young s lab discovered the majority of the genes that regulate the fly s circadian clock Young s findings have the potential to help individuals suffering from sleep and mood disorders as well as dysfunctions related to the timing of gene activities in visual function locomotion metabolism learning and memory Young received his undergraduate degree in biology in 1971 and his Ph D in genetics in 1975 both from The University of Texas Austin Following postdoctoral work in biochemistry at the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/03/21/jeffrey-v-ravetch-and-michael-w-young-to-receive-canada-gairdner-international-awards/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Study in fruit flies reveals a gene affecting the ability to sleep | Newswire
    fly sleeps for average of 927 minutes a day insomniac flies snoozed for just 317 The mutant flies also slept for shorter periods of time and slept and woke more frequently Sleepless nights A fly s nervous system is tagged to show individual cells that express the insomniac gene green Researchers have found that mutations in insomniac are associated with a dramatic reduction in sleep The results showed a dramatic loss of both the duration of the flies sleep and their ability to remain asleep after they dozed off says Stavropoulos But what s especially interesting is that the insomniac gene may function through homeostatic mechanisms These are distinct from the well studied circadian clock pathways linked to sleep and have an effect on the body regardless of the time of day The scientists believe that insomniac works by engaging a specific series of protein degradation pathways in neurons through a complex known as Cul3 If correct this would be the first time that a protein degradation pathway in which specific proteins are eliminated within a cell has been linked to sleep The researchers also examined the link between sleep and lifespan finding that flies with mutations to the insomniac gene lived only about two thirds as long as unaltered flies other studies have suggested similar effects in both flies and rats that are deprived of sleep But when the scientists eliminated insomniac only in neurons allowing it to remain in the rest of the flies bodies this disparity was eliminated the resulting animals slept poorly but lived just as long This suggests that reduced sleep can be uncoupled from reduced lifespan supporting the idea that some disruptions of sleep do not affect overall health at least as far as lifespan is concerned Stavropoulos says Although flies and humans would

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/01/27/study-of-fruit-fly-sleep-reveals-a-genetic-basis-of-insomnia/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Michael Young receives Gruber Foundation’s 2009 Neuroscience Prize | Newswire
    molecular underpinnings of the circadian rhythms of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster many people questioned whether a compelling relationship between genes and behavior could be established By the early 1970s the first fruit fly mutants with altered circadian rest active cycles had been identified making a case for the genetic control of behavior but the mechanism behind the phenomenon remained unknown It wasn t until 1984 that scientists began to understand what was running the internal biological clock in Drosophila That year Hall and Rosbash working at Brandeis University and Young working at Rockefeller simultaneously cloned the period per gene of Drosophila That pivotal discovery led to subsequent studies from all three labs that eventually unmasked the general molecular mechanism for circadian clocks a transcriptional feedback loop that oscillates during the 24 hour cycle In the 1990s Young identified per s partner gene timeless tim and showed that these two proteins accumulate pair up in the cell s cytoplasm and then migrate into the nucleus where their presence switches off their production by shutting down the per and tim genes These events are strictly timed within the cell as PER and TIM are retained in the cytoplasm for a fixed interval lasting several hours This delay promotes RNA and protein rhythms and determines the period of the clock Another of his laboratory s discoveries is that the enzyme casein kinase 1 regulates the pace of this 24 hour molecular clock by restricting the longevity of the PER protein in this process It has recently been shown by others that faulty interactions between casein kinase 1 and PER are responsible for certain heritable disorders of sleep in humans Young received his undergraduate degree in biology in 1971 and his Ph D in genetics in 1975 both from The University of Texas

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/07/01/michael-young-receives-gruber-foundations-2009-neuroscience-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Gruber Foundation | Newswire
    Professor and head of the Laboratory of Genetics at Rockefeller University has received the 2009 Neuroscience Prize of the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation for groundbreaking discoveries of the molecular mechanisms that control circadian rhythms in the nervous system More Tags Gruber Foundation Michael W Young Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/gruber-foundation/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Libchaber and Young elected to National Academy of Sciences | Newswire
    between organisms and their environments such as fish swimming in water and to the organism at the cellular and molecular level Libchaber came to Rockefeller in 1994 He is a member of the French Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been previously honored with such awards as the Wolf Foundation Prize in Physics and a John D and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Richard and Jeanne Fisher Professor Michael Young who is also vice president for academic affairs at Rockefeller focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms in the fruit fly His research has implications for greater understanding of sleep and mood disorders as well as the biological processes behind learning and memory visual functions locomotion and metabolism Young joined the Rockefeller faculty as part of The Rockefeller University Fellows program in 1978 He is also a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and the Genetics Society of America In 1998 the journal Science named his discovery of a gene that regulates sleep wake cycles and related work on circadian rhythms a Breakthrough of the Year I am especially glad to congratulate Albert Libchaber and Michael Young Membership in the National Academy of Sciences remains one of the most prestigious honors bestowed upon scientists in this country and highly deserved in the case of two such innovative and dedicated researchers says Paul Nurse Rockefeller University president The Rockefeller faculty now includes 35 members or foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences an organization of scientists and engineers dedicated to the furtherance of science and its use for the general welfare The academy was established in 1863 by a congressional act of incorporation signed by President Abraham Lincoln that calls on the academy to act as an official

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2007/05/01/libchaber-and-young-elected-to-national-academy-of-sciences/ (2016-02-13)
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