archive-edu.com » EDU » R » ROCKEFELLER.EDU

Total: 1631

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • ResearchMatch | Newswire
    research trials available on ResearchMatch the country s first registry for recruiting research participants The secure Web site offers a free and safe way for volunteers to connect with thousands of researchers who are conducting research on a wide range of diseases More Tags Barry S Coller Center for Clinical and Translational Science ResearchMatch Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/researchmatch/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New clinical study will help doctors assess abnormal bleeding | Newswire
    standards for assessing preoperative risk Many subtle bleeding diatheses manifest only after an individual is exposed to a hemostatic challenge such as surgery when a problem occurs says Mauer The study carries implications for research as well as the results may allow investigators to draw correlations between lab results or genetic analyses and bleeding symptoms which will in turn allow them to identify patients who may have genetic or environmental factors that influence their bleeding symptoms Mauer and his colleagues including Ed Barbour Nickolay Khazanov Natasha Levenkova and Shamim Mollah of the CCTS s informatics department will also break down the range of what s normal for subgroups classified by age sex medication use race ethnicity and history of trauma or surgeries factors that may affect the bleeding score Further delineation of normal bleeding will assist the team with its secondary aim of validating and refining the questionnaire Screening for bleeding symptoms is hardly a new thing but PRAT is an improvement on standard tests and questionnaires in a number of ways Certain questions have you ever had a skin disorder that manifests in little red dots for example are much easier to get across with the aid of photographs which PRAT s Web based interface allows for Participants complete the survey with the assistance of a physician or nurse practitioner who helps properly interpret all questions The questions themselves are highly specific and cover a comprehensive gamut of symptomology What we re applying here is something that pollsters are very familiar with that how you ask the question makes a big difference in the answer says Mauer Being a Web based open source HTML coded interface the questionnaire can also be administered at sites outside The Rockefeller University Hospital Our ultimate vision is that researchers worldwide will be interested

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2008/11/03/new-clinical-study-will-help-doctors-assess-abnormal-bleeding/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • PRAT | Newswire
    bleeding A new assessment tool being tested at The Rockefeller University Hospital may help physicians and researchers more accurately determine what is inside and outside the normal range of bleeding symptoms More Tags Barry S Coller PRAT Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University RU Footer The Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/prat/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New molecule could be key to new anti-heart-attack drug | Newswire
    can prevent an unwanted clot or thrombus and the three αIIbβ3 inhibitors currently on the market can do just that But they also have side effects and risks Barry Coller David Rockefeller Professor and head of the Allen and Frances Adler Laboratory of Blood and Vascular Biology and laboratory manager Robert Blue have found a new molecule called RUC 1 that not only appears to sidestep these problems but unlike existing drugs could be taken orally The αIIbβ3 receptor is made up of two halves the αIIb subunit and the β3 subunit Previous attempts to create αIIbβ3 inhibitors that could be taken orally led to drugs that bind to both halves this blocks other platelets from attaching but also changes the configuration of the receptor to its on position Once the drug wears off the inhibitor may leave the receptor in the on position making the platelet primed and ready for other passing platelets to bind As a result once the inhibitor is gone and the receptors are still in the active conformation you get a paradoxical increase in thrombus formation Blue says In research published in Blood Coller and Blue and their colleagues Marketa Jirouskova and Marta Murcia describe the structural effects of RUC 1 which was discovered by screening more than 33 000 compounds in collaboration with Charles Karan at the university s High Throughput Screening facility Rather than binding to the entire receptor RUC 1 binds to only half of it αIIb presumably leaving the other half in the off position This structural effect appears to have practical implications In a separate study together with collaborators at Children s Hospital of Philadelphia Blue and Coller are now assessing the effect of RUC 1 on mice with human αIIb and mouse β3 receptors Their research is some of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2008/04/17/new-molecule-could-be-key-to-new-anti-heart-attack-drug/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • heart attack | Newswire
    More Tags Barry S Coller heart attack September 16 1997 Science News Hunt for Early Heart Attack Genes Begins More than 2 000 people will be enrolled in a hunt for the genetic causes that underlie early heart attacks that strike men and women in middle age The study is part of the research program of the Starr Center for Human Genetics at The Rockefeller University in New York City

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/heart-attack/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Help for bleeding hearts: new research links a third protein to blood-clotting disorders | Newswire
    for coagulation analyzing patients with the disorder previously led Coller to develop a novel therapy for heart attack and stroke victims that targets this receptor In research published in the April 1 issue of Blood Coller and Beau Mitchell a research associate in Coller s lab further characterize the αIIbβ3 receptor by exploring its production and degradation With colleagues at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine they found that the production of the receptor the protein complex of both αIIb and β3 is dependent on a third molecule called calnexin Calnexin plays an important role in protein folding and the researchers found that it not only helps form the αIIbβ3 receptor complex but also tags improperly folded β3 proteins for destruction Their findings suggest that the factor that controls receptor formation is likely the calnexin cycle if the two receptor proteins fail to form a correctly folded complex αIIb is broken down by the cell Coller hopes that further study of αIIbβ3 will yield more information about not just Glanzmann thrombasthenia but the synthesis of other receptors like it These receptors which are in the integrin superfamily play a role in many different functions including embryonic development inflammation and tumor

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2006/04/14/help-for-bleeding-hearts-new-research-links-a-third-protein-to-blood-clotting-disorders/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • clotting | Newswire
    Analyzing patients with a rare blood disorder led Rockefeller scientists to discover that a protein called calnexin is required to build a blood cell receptor that s required for clotting More Tags Barry S Coller clotting Glanzmann Kristine Kelly 212 327 7900 Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/clotting/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Kristine Kelly | 212-327-7900 | Newswire
    clotting disorders Analyzing patients with a rare blood disorder led Rockefeller scientists to discover that a protein called calnexin is required to build a blood cell receptor that s required for clotting More Tags Barry S Coller clotting Glanzmann Kristine Kelly 212 327 7900 Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/kristine-kelly-212-327-7900/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive