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  • Michel C. Nussenzweig | Newswire | Page 2
    immune responses originate and how they multiply especially in the spleen and lymph system The findings are especially important for scientists developing immune cell targeted vaccines More Tags dendritic cells Michel C Nussenzweig May 2 2007 Awards and Honors De Lange Nussenzweig elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences Rockefeller University faculty will become members of the independent policy and research center devoted to studying complex emerging problems More Tags American Academy of Arts and Sciences Michel C Nussenzweig Titia de Lange February 1 2007 Science News First ever images of a living immune structure shows B cells in action When an infection strikes B cells act as the immune system s tag and release team hunting down the invading pathogen with incredible accuracy and labeling it with antibodies that tell other immune cells to destroy it Now Rockefeller University researchers have found a way to peer inside the germinal centers where B cells learn to recognize their prey and discovered that the structures are not closed factories as most scientists previously believed but are open dynamic systems through which B cells continually pass More Tags B cells Michel C Nussenzweig January 12 2007 Science News Preparing a multi pronged attach Different subsets of dendritic cells help expand the immune system s response Dendritic cells coordinate and direct the body s immune response playing a crucial role in our ability to fend off disease In findings that give a boost to vaccine research Rockefeller University scientists show that different types of dendritic cells process antigens differently More Tags dendritic cells MHC Michel C Nussenzweig February 13 2006 Science News Damaged tumor suppressor plays major role in lymphoma development Scientists have known for years that chromosomal translocations abnormalities in which a piece of one chromosome breaks off and fuses to another lead to a type of blood cancer called lymphoma but little was known about how cells accumulate translocations or defend themselves against them Now Rockefeller researchers say a malfunction in tumor suppressor proteins like p53 or p19 result in the development of translocations induced by AID a genome destroyer that initiates DNA damage More Tags lymphoma Michel C Nussenzweig August 23 2004 Science News Genome destroyer identified in the immune system Our bodies have such great capacity to heal it s hard to imagine that we naturally manufacture a product in our immune system that can endanger our own DNA and provide a biological footstep to cancer But this is precisely the case More Tags AID Michel C Nussenzweig September 5 2003 Science News Measuring early antibody aptituteds For the first time a group of immunologists from the laboratory of Molecular Immunology headed by Michel Nussenzweig Ph D measured the immunity aptitude of developing B cells found in the bone marrow and blood of healthy adults They discovered that between 55 75 of premature B cells are prone to bad behavior or auto reactivity More Tags B cells immunity aptitude Michel C Nussenzweig March 8 2002 Science News Sugar

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/michel-c-nussenzweig/page/2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • In the News – GlobeAndMail – Nussenzweig | Newswire
    at Rockefeller University suggests that a quiet body of immune cells that do not divide could harbour a reserve of HIV virus a potential target for therapies aimed at curing rather than managing the disease Tags HIV Michel C Nussenzweig newswire rockefeller edu Latent HIV may lurk in quiet immune cells research suggests Jeffrey Ravetch wins Wolf Prize in Medicine Comments are closed Search for Categories Science News Awards and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/01/31/in-the-news-globeandmail-nussenzweig/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Antibodies, together with viral ‘inducers,’ found to control HIV in mice | Newswire
    published August 28 in Cell The problematic latent reservoirs of HIV infected cells are established very early in the infections possibly even before tests can detect the presence of the virus and current drug therapies are unable to kill the latent cells The latent reservoir remains the major barrier to curing HIV 1 infection says Nussenzweig who is the Zanvil A Cohn and Ralph M Steinman Professor and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Our finding suggests that antibodies could play a significant role in disrupting the establishment and maintenance of the latent reservoir which is believed to be a necessary step to curing patients of HIV 1 The Nussenzweig lab has worked for several years on broadly neutralizing antibodies a recently discovered subset of antibodies with an unusually high ability to recognize HIV consistently despite the virus s ability to rapidly mutate Broadly neutralizing antibodies have shown great promise for treating HIV infection in mouse and monkey models of HIV But by themselves they suffered the same problem that plagued other therapies when you stop administering them the virus rebounds Counterintuitively the key to success in this instance was combining broadly neutralizing antibodies with viral inducers compounds that prompt latent viruses to become active by promoting the transcription of their DNA The idea is to eliminate the invisibility of the latent reservoir while simultaneously attacking the virus More than half of the mice that received broadly neutralizing antibodies along with a cocktail of three viral inducers had no viral rebound at all even three and a half months after their last injection Broadly neutralizing antibodies alone or even in combination with a single viral inducer did not have this effect nor did combinations of anti retroviral drugs and viral inducers that have been attempted in the past The researchers

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/08/14/antibodies-together-with-viral-inducers-found-to-control-hiv-in-mice/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Adjunct faculty member Kayo Inaba receives L’Oréal-UNESCO Women in Science award | Newswire
    of Molecular Immunology at Rockefeller and previously worked in Ralph Steinman s Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology She is also a professor in the Graduate School of Biostudies at Kyoto University in Japan as well as the vice president for gender equality and the director of the Center for Women Researchers at Kyoto The awards presented by the L Oréal Corporate Foundation based in France and the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization were founded in 1998 to recognize women scientists who have not only made important contributions to science but have also been a source of support motivation and inspiration for other women researchers The awards are given to five individuals each year and carry a grant of 100 000 This year s recipients include the dean of Weill Cornell Medical College Laurie Glimcher a pioneer and leader in the field of immunology Inaba who was the first female associate professor on Kyoto University s Faculty of Science proved that dendritic cells specialized immune cells discovered at Rockefeller by Steinman initiate immune responses She developed a method for growing dendritic cells from bone marrow progenitors in culture which made dendritic cell biology accessible to other investigators Inaba provided the first evidence that dendritic cells could be used for cellular therapies by showing that antigen loaded dendritic cells induce effective anti cancer immune responses Inaba received her Ph D from the Kyoto University in 1978 and was a visiting faculty member in Ralph Steinman s laboratory from 1982 until 2011 She became associate professor at Kyoto in 1992 and was promoted to full professor in 1999 Inaba has been director of the Center for Women Researchers at Kyoto since 2007 The L Oréal UNESCO Women in Science award was also given to Rockefeller s Elaine Fuchs in 2010

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/03/03/adjunct-faculty-member-kayo-inaba-receives-loreal-unesco-women-in-science-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Kayo Inaba | Newswire
    lab is known for her work on specialized immune cells called dendritic cells Inaba is being honored as the Asia Pacific recipient of the L Oréal UNESCO Women in Science award which supports eminent women in science throughout the world who are working in life and physical sciences More Tags dendritic cells Kayo Inaba L Oréal UNESCO prize Michel C Nussenzweig Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/kayo-inaba/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Nature online: February 7, 2012 | Newswire
    Nakahashi Davide F Robbiani Andre Nussenzweig Gordon L Hager Michel C Nussenzweig and Rafael Casellas In the absence of recurrent DNA damage translocations between Igh or Myc and all other genes are directly related to their contact frequency Conversely translocations associated with recurrent site directed DNA damage are proportional to the rate of DNA break formation as measured by replication protein A accumulation at the site of damage Tags Michel

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/02/07/nature-online-february-7-2012/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Scientists identify broad and potent HIV antibodies that mimic CD4 binding | Newswire
    What really surprised us was how similar these antibodies were even though they came from different donors so the path to make them seems to be quite narrow The new research builds on previous findings from the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology headed by Sherman Fairchild Professor Michel C Nussenzweig Scheid and colleagues first characterized in 2009 the overall B cell repertoire against the HIV surface protein in patients with broadly neutralizing antibodies on a monoclonal level These patients are a group of individuals that make up roughly 10 percent of HIV patients and their antibodies are able to kill a wide range of diverse HIV strains Later Hugo Mouquet and colleagues in Nussenzweig s lab investigated how polyreactivity might be selected for in the antibody response against HIV In related research John Pietzsch and colleagues described the fine epitope of one group of HIV neutralizing antibodies For the latest research Nussenzweig and Scheid along with David D Ho of Rockefeller and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and Rockefeller s Brian T Chait looked at the immune system of four unrelated slow progressing HIV patients The patients produced expanded clones of potent broadly neutralizing CD4 binding site antibodies that mimic binding to CD4 the receptor that HIV uses to gain entry into host T cells The researchers cloned 576 new HIV antibodies which were derived from a small number of germ line immunoglobulin genes In addition despite undergoing extensive hypermutation these antibodies show striking sequence and structural similarities suggesting that the path for the immune system to achieve this potent activity against the CD4 binding site might be narrow The researchers also found that relatively low concentrations of these broadly neutralizing antibodies are required to neutralize the virus This work will help us to understand better how broad neutralization is

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/07/19/scientists-identify-broad-and-potent-hiv-antibodies-that-mimic-cd4-binding/ (2016-02-13)
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  • David D. Ho | Newswire
    new vaccine could be rapidly produced and effective against a broad spectrum of viral strains More Tags avian flu David D Ho September 30 2002 Science News CAF protein mystery solved by AIDS researchers Acclaimed AIDS researcher David Ho M D a Rockefeller University Irene Diamond Professor who heads the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center ADARC and his research team have discovered that several natural proteins alpha defensins 1 2 and 3 can be manufactured and released by killer T cells to inhibit HIV More Tags David D Ho defensis January 8 2001 Awards and Honors Rockefeller and Aaron Diamond Researcher David D Ho Receives Presidential Citizens Medal Rockefeller University Professor David D Ho M D scientific director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center ADARC will receive the Presidential Citizens Medal from President Clinton today in a ceremony at the White House Ho is one of 28 recipients being recognized for remarkable service and accomplishments in a variety of areas More Tags David D Ho Presidential Citizens Medal June 13 1996 Science News Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center Affiliates with The Rockefeller University The Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center for the City of New York the largest private HIV

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/david-d-ho/ (2016-02-13)
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