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  • Rockefeller announces tenure appointments of two faculty | Newswire
    embody the kind of bold science that the university is known for says Nurse Kapoor who holds bachelor s degrees in chemistry and biology from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph D in chemistry from Harvard University came to Rockefeller as assistant professor in 2001 following his postdoc at Harvard Medical School He was named associate professor in 2005 The Kapoor lab applies chemical approaches to the study of cell division Kapoor s research is focused on the mitotic spindle the cellular assembly that guides the movement of chromosomes into their proper positions in preparation for cell division In addition to studying how the spindle establishes bipolarity which is required for proper cell division Kapoor aims to understand how the cell detects and corrects errors in the process which are linked to developmental defects failed pregnancy and cancer Kapoor also designs and discovers chemicals that block cell division through new mechanisms He is the recipient of a Pew Fellowship in the Biomedical Sciences among other honors Rout began his Rockefeller career as a postdoc in the laboratory of Günter Blobel after receiving his Ph D in 1990 from the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in the United Kingdom where he studied with J V Kilmartin He was appointed assistant professor and head of lab in 1997 and was named associate professor in 2002 The Rout lab is focused on defining the structure mechanism and function of the nuclear pore complex the macromolecular assembly that forms the gateway between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in all eukaryotic cells and regulates the transport of molecules into and out of the nucleus Revealing the molecular architecture of the nuclear pore complex as a whole has largely defied traditional techniques Hence Rout employs a hybrid approach of experimental methods integrating

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2008/07/15/rockefeller-announces-tenure-appointments-of-two-faculty/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Rockefeller researchers identify how protein linked to cancer correct cells when they divide | Newswire
    cells inherit all of its genetic information During normal cell division each replicated chromosome pair attaches to a bipolar structure called the mitotic spindle made up of protein polymers known as microtubules For each replicated pair one sister chromosome attaches to one pole of the spindle and the other sister attaches to the opposite pole When the cell divides sister chromosomes split up and are pulled in opposite directions so that each daughter cell receives exactly one copy of each replicated chromosome When errors in this process occur the daughter cells don t receive all their genes leading to developmental defects and diseases such as cancer in the organism One such error occurs when both sister chromosomes of a replicated pair attach to the same pole of the mitotic spindle in a dividing cell The result is that both sister chromosomes are pulled in the same direction leading to an extra copy of a chromosome in one daughter cell and a missing chromosome in the other daughter cell Lampson and his colleagues asked How does the cell avoid making this mistake To find the answer the Rockefeller scientists used small organic molecules to perturb the process of cell division These inhibitors permeate the cell membrane and block the action of various proteins Scientists have known that without Aurora kinase chromosomes become very prone to improper attachments in dividing cells But its role in correcting these improper chromosome attachments was largely unknown To understand the mechanism Lampson and his colleagues used a small molecule called Aurora kinase inhibitor 1 AKI 1 which was originally developed by the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca as a potential cancer drug AKI 1 as its name implies inhibits Aurora kinase activity Scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna had suggested that Aurora kinase activity

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2004/02/27/rockefeller-researchers-identify-how-protein-linked-to-cancer-correct-cells-when-they-divide/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeffrey M. Friedman | Newswire | Page 2
    2000 Science News Researchers Identify Molecule That Senses Osmotic Pressure in Vertebrates Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Rockefeller University have identified a molecule in vertebrates that senses osmotic pressure the measure of saltiness essential for living cells and may provide an inroad into understanding inner ear function and the sense of touch More Tags inner ear Jeffrey M Friedman osmotic pressure April 20 2000 Science News Chipping Away at Leptin s Effects Rockefeller researchers are using genechip technology a powerful tool for analyzing the expression patterns of thousands of genes at a time Researchers in the Friedman lab have identified a number of genes that are specifically regulated by the hormone leptin More Tags Jeffrey M Friedman August 4 1997 Science News Resistance to Leptin Contributes to Obesity Insensitivity to the protein leptin which helps the body regulate its fat stores contributes to obesity in mice according to the first formal study of leptin intolerance report scientists in the Aug 5 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The findings also provide clues about leptin s action in the nervous system and may help to explain some forms of obesity that affect humans including more than 50 million overweight adult Americans the researchers note More Tags Jeffrey M Friedman Obesity February 14 1996 Science News Mutations in a Leptin Receptor Cause Obesity in Mice The weight reducing effects of leptin a hormone that signals the size of the body s fat stores result from an interaction with a receptor in the brain s hypothalamus report scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute HHMI at The Rockefeller University in the Feb 15 Nature More Tags hypothalamus Jeffrey M Friedman Ob R October 31 1995 Science News Leptin Helps Body Regulate Fat Links to Diet Leptin a protein produced

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/jeffrey-m-friedman/page/2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeffrey M. Friedman receives Albert Lasker Award for discovery of leptin | Newswire
    and humans called obese ob that codes for a hormone he later named leptin after the Greek word leptos for thin Friedman and colleagues showed that leptin is a hormonal signal made by the body s fat cells that regulates food intake and energy expenditure Leptin has powerful effects on reproduction metabolism other endocrine systems and even immune function Mice that lack ob and thus do not produce leptin are massively obese weighing as much as three times the size of their normal littermates Friedman showed that after normal and ob deficient mice are injected with synthetic leptin they are more active and lose weight In addition humans lacking leptin eat copious amounts and are massively obese Leptin treatment of these individuals leads to massive weight loss The dramatic effect of leptin in these patients establishes a key role for this hormone in human physiology However the majority of obese people have very high levels of leptin circulating in their blood Friedman s lab went on to show that high leptin levels are associated with resistance to leptin and provided evidence that suggests that animals destined to be obese increase their production of leptin to satisfy a higher set point for weight These observations have reframed views on the pathogenesis of obesity and suggested that the development of approaches to improve leptin response in resistant individuals could provide new treatments for obesity The ob mouse was first discovered in 1950 by researchers at The Jackson Laboratory Then in 1966 animal care technicians noticed some young mice that were much fatter than their siblings with symptoms of diabetes It was Friedman s Lasker Award co recipient Coleman who became interested in these mice known as diabetes db mutant mice for his studies of metabolic pathways Coleman conducted a series of experiments

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/09/21/jeffrey-m-friedman-receives-albert-lasker-award-for-discovery-of-leptin/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Douglas L. Coleman | Newswire
    Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research the most prestigious American prize in science honors Rockefeller University s Jeffrey M Friedman who discovered leptin a hormone that regulates food intake and body weight More Tags Douglas L Coleman Jeffrey M Friedman Laboratory of Molecular Genetics Lasker Award Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/douglas-l-coleman/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Obesity researcher wins Keio Medical Science Prize | Newswire
    which they identified a gene in mice and humans called obese ob which codes for a hormone he later named leptin after the Greek word leptos for thin Friedman and colleagues showed that leptin is a hormonal signal made by the body s fat cells that regulates food intake and energy expenditure The discovery provided a genetic explanation of obesity and has challenged the popular belief that lack of willpower causes people to be obese With Friedman s discovery of leptin and subsequent studies of its function the logic of an entirely new physiological system has been established with direct implications for the pathophysiology of human obesity Friedman has shown that leptin has powerful effects not only on weight but on reproduction metabolism other endocrine systems and even immune function In addition to providing scientists with a new target for treating obesity the work has helped clinicians develop treatments for other related metabolic conditions including diabetes and for women with hypothalamic amenorrhea The Keio Medical Science Prize administered by Keio University in Japan was established in 1995 through a donation by Keio School of Medicine alumnus Mitsunada Sakaguchi The prize is awarded annually to researchers for outstanding achievements in the fields of life sciences and medicine in the hope of encouraging the expansion of researcher networks and ultimately contributing to world peace This year s prize which comes with 20 million yen approximately 218 000 for each recipient will be presented at a special ceremony at Keio University School of Medicine in December Friedman received his M D from Albany Medical College of Union University at the age of 22 and his Ph D from Rockefeller University He was appointed assistant professor at Rockefeller in 1986 becoming head of laboratory in 1991 and professor in 1995 He also directs Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/09/28/obesity-researcher-wins-keio-medical-science-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Keio Medical Science Prize | Newswire
    the 14th Keio Medical Science Prize awarded annually to researchers for outstanding achievements in the fields of life sciences and medicine for the discovery of leptin and the study of its physiological functions More Tags Jeffrey M Friedman Keio Medical Science Prize Obesity Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/keio-medical-science-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jeffrey Friedman receives Shaw Prize for discovery of leptin | Newswire
    also is an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and his colleagues published a landmark paper in the journal Nature in which they identified a gene in mice and humans called obese ob that codes for a hormone he later named leptin after the Greek word leptos for thin Friedman and colleagues showed that leptin is a hormonal signal made by the body s fat cells that regulates food intake and energy expenditure Leptin has powerful effects on reproduction metabolism other endocrine systems and even immune function Mice that lack ob and thus do not produce leptin are massively obese weighing as much as three times the size of their normal littermates Friedman showed that after normal and ob deficient mice are injected with synthetic leptin they are more active and lose weight In addition humans lacking leptin eat copious amounts and are massively obese Leptin treatment of these individuals leads to massive weight loss The dramatic effect of leptin in these patients establishes a key role for this hormone in human physiology However the majority of obese people have very high levels of leptin circulating in their blood Friedman s lab went on to show that high leptin levels are associated with resistance to leptin and provided evidence that suggests that animals destined to be obese increase their production of leptin to satisfy a higher set point for weight These observations have reframed views on the pathogenesis of obesity and suggested that the development of approaches to improve leptin response in resistant individuals could provide new treatments for obesity The ob mouse was first discovered in 1950 by researchers at The Jackson Laboratory Then in 1966 animal care technicians noticed some young mice that were much fatter than their siblings with symptoms of diabetes Coleman became interested in

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/06/16/jeffrey-friedman-receives-shaw-prize-for-discovery-of-leptin/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive