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  • Newswire Archives | Newswire
    1997 1996 1995 1994 Comments are closed Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University RU Footer The Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/archive/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newswire
    with the latest news from Rockefeller University subscribe to Newswire via e mail and receive biweekly updates Enter your address below SUBSCRIBE Your Email Email Format HTML Plain Text UNSUBSCRIBE Your Email Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University RU Footer The Rockefeller University 1230 York Avenue New

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/emailsub.php?r=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off sleeping sickness parasite | Newswire
    proteins that packages a cell s genetic information can trick the parasite into differentiating to a different stage of its lifecycle The study was published on December 8 in PLOS Biology By blocking these chromatin interacting proteins we have found a way to make the parasite visible to the immune system says Nina Papavasiliou head of the Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology The bloodstream form of the parasite is constantly switching protein coats so the immune system can t recognize and eliminate it This new method makes the parasite think it s in the fly where it doesn t need to worry about the immune system attacking it Epigenetic regulation Regulatory proteins interact with chromatin to either unwind it or package it more tightly affecting which genes are expressed Some of these regulatory proteins contain a region called the bromodomain which recognizes a specific signal on chromatin and induces changes in gene expression Recent findings in mice have indicated that bromodomains are involved in cell differentiation which led Papavasiliou and colleagues to hypothesize that such epigenetic mechanisms may drive the trypanosome to change from one form to another The changes in gene expression that accompany the transition between the different parasite forms had been well established said Schulz the lead author of the study But we didn t understand if there was some type of regulation happening at DNA at the level of chromatin Whether chromatin altering mechanisms might be important for differentiation hadn t really been studied before To investigate this the researchers inhibited bromodomain proteins in cells by introducing genetic mutations in their DNA or by exposing the cells to a small molecule drug called I BET151 which is known to block bromodomains in mammals When these perturbations were made the investigators observed changes in gene expression levels that resembled those seen in cells differentiating from the bloodstream form to the fly form They also saw that the parasites developed a procyclin coat normally found on the fly form Based on these findings Papavasiliou and colleagues suggest that proteins with bromodomains maintain the bloodstream form of trypanosomes and inhibiting them causes the parasite to progress in its development toward the fly form They believe bromodomains could serve as a potential therapeutic target to treat African sleeping sickness Harnessing the natural immune system To explore whether I BET151 could be used to combat the disease the researchers used drug treated trypanosomes to infect mice The mice infected with drug treated trypanosomes survived significantly longer than those infected with untreated trypanosomes indicating that the virulence of the parasite its ability to invade the host was diminished in the presence of I BET151 When bromodomains are inhibited the variant protein coat is replaced with an unvarying coat on the surface of the trypanosome cell says Schulz This means that the parasite surface is no longer a moving target giving the immune system enough time to eliminate it I BET151 is not effective enough to be used in the clinic but a crystal

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/12/08/study-suggests-new-way-to-help-the-immune-system-fight-off-sleeping-sickness-parasite/ (2016-02-13)
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  • African sleeping sickness | Newswire
    study scientists are the first to map the epigenetic changes that are likely to play a role in the molecular origami of transcription initiation in Trypanosoma brucei the deadly single celled parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness More Tags African sleeping sickness George A M Cross histone code April 15 2009 Science News Parasite breaks its own DNA to avoid detection The parasite Trypanosoma brucei which causes African sleeping sickness is like a thief donning a disguise Every time the host s immune cells get close to destroying the parasite it escapes detection by rearranging its DNA and changing its appearance Now researchers at Rockefeller University reveal how the parasite initiates its getaway by cleaving both strands of its DNA More Tags African sleeping sickness F Nina Papavasiliou George A M Cross January 29 2007 Science News DNA breaks may help parasites elude the immune system Changing their appearance helps many pathogens hide from detection In the parasite Trypanosoma brucei surface proteins recognized by the host s immune system may be altered by the same process that repairs broken DNA The key lies in T brucei s variant surface glycoproteins which coat the parasite s surface More Tags African sleeping

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/african-sleeping-sickness/ (2016-02-13)
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  • F. Nina Papavasiliou | Newswire
    strategy for evading its hosts immune systems revealed that the blood parasites assume a surprising diversity of protein coat disguises In fact the number of disguises necessary to maintain a long term infection appears to exceed the functional genes that encode them More Tags antigenic variation F Nina Papavasiliou George Cross Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology Monical Mugnier parasitic infection sleeping sickness Trypanosoma brucei VSG November 19 2009 Science News Scientists identify DNA that regulates antibody production When foreign invaders trip the immune system s alarm antibodies need to be specially sculpted to attack them head on New research now shows that gene segments called enhancers control the reshuffling of antibody genes that makes such a precise and coordinated attack possible More Tags F Nina Papavasiliou Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology Nathaniel Heintz Peter Model April 15 2009 Science News Parasite breaks its own DNA to avoid detection The parasite Trypanosoma brucei which causes African sleeping sickness is like a thief donning a disguise Every time the host s immune cells get close to destroying the parasite it escapes detection by rearranging its DNA and changing its appearance Now researchers at Rockefeller University reveal how the parasite initiates its getaway by cleaving both strands of its DNA More Tags African sleeping sickness F Nina Papavasiliou George A M Cross June 9 2008 Science News Scientists identify a key regulator of DNA mutations As a general rule your DNA is not something you want rearranged But there are exceptions especially when it comes to fighting infections Now two teams of researchers at Rockefeller University independently show how a tiny recently identified molecule once implicated in cancer can not only help defend against it but also keep invading microbes at bay More Tags F Nina Papavasiliou Michel C Nussenzweig MicroRNAs August 18 2006 Science

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/f-nina-papavasiliou/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Günter Blobel | Newswire
    questions about the proteins orientation More Tags Günter Blobel Laboratory of Cell Biology Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics nuclear pore complex Sandy Simon June 7 2009 Science News Research identifies 3D structure of key nuclear pore building block New research into the molecular machine that filters all information traveling in or out of the cell nucleus contributes to an unfolding picture of cellular evolution that shows a common architecture for the nuclear pore complex NPC and the vehicles that transport material between different parts of the cell Scientists have for the first time glimpsed in three dimensions the subcomplex of the NPC that is its key building block More Tags Günter Blobel Martin Kampmann nuclear pore complex January 15 2008 Science News New model of a nuclear pore complex is based on crystal structure of its key component In the second nuclear pore study to come out of Rockefeller University in as many months researchers have determined the crystal structure of one of the pore s main components Using that shape as their base they propose an overall structure for the circular pore rings of alternating protein complexes that fit together like two sides of a zipper More Tags Andre Hoelz Günter Blobel nuclear pore complex April 13 2007 Science News Building the nuclear pore piece by piece Because the nuclear pore is the only way in or out of the nucleus the cell is in dire straits when the pore malfunctions as in forms of leukemia where nuclear pore complex proteins are mutated Two new structural renderings of nuclear pore complex proteins however created in the Nobel Prize winning lab that has worked for nearly 40 years on understanding how proteins are transported within cells are beginning to shed light on this puzzling assembly More Tags Andre Hoelz Günter Blobel

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/gunter-blobel/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology | Newswire
    Biology parasitic infection small molecule inhibitors Virology and Microbiology November 16 2015 Campus News Rockefeller s newest faculty member investigates how antibodies are made Gabriel Victora an immunologist who studies the processes by which the immune system refines its response to an infection will establish the Laboratory of Lymphocyte Dynamics in September of 2016 where he will study antibody responses at the levels molecules cells and whole organs More Tags affinity maturation antibodies Gabriel Victora immunology Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology new faculty March 26 2015 Science News To survive a parasite mixes and matches its disguises study suggests A detailed look at the African sleeping sickness parasite s strategy for evading its hosts immune systems revealed that the blood parasites assume a surprising diversity of protein coat disguises In fact the number of disguises necessary to maintain a long term infection appears to exceed the functional genes that encode them More Tags antigenic variation F Nina Papavasiliou George Cross Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology Monical Mugnier parasitic infection sleeping sickness Trypanosoma brucei VSG November 19 2009 Science News Scientists identify DNA that regulates antibody production When foreign invaders trip the immune system s alarm antibodies need to be specially sculpted to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-lymphocyte-biology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • parasitic infection | Newswire
    Blobel immunology Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology parasitic infection small molecule inhibitors Virology and Microbiology March 26 2015 Science News To survive a parasite mixes and matches its disguises study suggests A detailed look at the African sleeping sickness parasite s strategy for evading its hosts immune systems revealed that the blood parasites assume a surprising diversity of protein coat disguises In fact the number of disguises necessary to maintain a

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/parasitic-infection/ (2016-02-13)
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