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  • small-molecule inhibitors | Newswire
    effects A new study reveals a method involving epigenetic mechanisms that causes the African sleeping sickness parasite to change into a new state potentially making it easier for the host immune system to eliminate it More Tags African sleeping sickness chromatin F Nina Papavasiliou Günter Blobel immunology Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology parasitic infection small molecule inhibitors Virology and Microbiology Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/small-molecule-inhibitors/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Virology and Microbiology | Newswire
    effects A new study reveals a method involving epigenetic mechanisms that causes the African sleeping sickness parasite to change into a new state potentially making it easier for the host immune system to eliminate it More Tags African sleeping sickness chromatin F Nina Papavasiliou Günter Blobel immunology Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology parasitic infection small molecule inhibitors Virology and Microbiology Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/virology-and-microbiology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • New research helps to explain how temperature shifts the circadian clock | Newswire
    that drive the clocks of many different species In fruit flies for example a pair of proteins called Period and Timeless are transcribed from their genes and after a series of steps eventually repress their own production This cycle takes approximately 24 hours regardless of the temperature at which an organism lives This makes the circadian clock an oddity since temperature alters the rate at which most biological processes take place For decades the dominant explanation for 24 hour period s independence from temperature a phenomenon known as temperature compensation relied on the heat sensitivity of the chemical reactions that run the time keeping cycle According to this theory the effects of temperature on the many chemical reactions in the circadian cycle cancel each other out leaving the period unaffected by changes in temperature But increasingly studies have suggested something else is going on For example a 2010 study showed that in fruit flies whose protective heat and stress response has been inhibited the clock hardly shifts with temperature changes Since the conventional model predicts that everything is temperature sensitive no single pathway should be this influential Previous work in Siggia s lab suggested an alternative explanation The investigators used computational tools to simulate the evolution of gene networks including a model of the circadian clock Their findings suggested that temperature induced shifts of the clock involve genetic pathways separate from the molecular cycles at the core of the clock but linked to them and that the core clock is actually insensitive to temperature Proportional at different temperatures The recent study s lead author Philip Kidd a postdoc in the labs of Siggia and Young set out to test this hypothesis Using a conceptual model and molecular experiments in flies he examined how the oscillations of individual components of the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/12/02/new-research-helps-to-explain-how-temperature-shifts-the-circadian-clock/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Center for Studies in Physics and Biology | Newswire
    and genomics Laboratory of Genetics Michael W Young molecular and cell biology Philip Kidd temperature compensation February 5 2010 Science News By tracking water molecules physicists hope to unlock secrets of life Compared to any other liquid on Earth water behaves in strange and unexpected ways yet its unusual properties enable and protect life as we know it By tracking individual water molecules in a supercooled state scientists find what

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/center-for-studies-in-physics-and-biology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • circadian clock | Newswire
    the satiety center of the brain The light dark cycle under normal conditions does a pretty good job of regulating mental alertness animals are typically alert during one part of the cycle and not so alert during the other New research from Rockefeller University shows how changing the timing of a meal can disrupt these patterns and reveals which regions of the brain are involved More Tags circadian clock Donald W Pfaff hunger satiety May 7 2007 Science News Single circadian clock regulates flies response to light and temperature Circadian rhythms allow animals to align their bodies to the earth s rotation Now new research shows that the same molecular clock that flies use to sync themselves to the sun s patterns is what allows them to sync to temperature patterns too More Tags circadian clock Michael W Young October 6 2006 Science News New function for protein links plant s circadian rhythm to its light detection mechanism Plants know when to flower because they set their circadian clocks by measuring the length and quality of the light they receive Now Rockefeller University researchers have found a new function for the protein SPA1 showing that it serves as an important link between a plant s light detection proteins and the rest of its circadian clock machinery More Tags circadian clock Nam Hai Chua January 11 2006 Science News New research shows how proteins make biological clock tick By looking inside a single cell and following two different proteins over several hours Rockefeller scientists have turned the old model of the cellular circadian clock on its head When the two proteins come together the scientists say they create a six hour timer that appears to tightly regulate the cell s circadian rhythm More Tags circadian clock FRET Michael W Young July

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/circadian-clock/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Eric Siggia | Newswire
    H Brivanlou developmental biology differentiation Eric Siggia French flag model speed fating TGF β May 5 2009 Awards and Honors Eric Siggia joins National Academy of Sciences Eric D Siggia whose laboratory is interested in applying informatics approaches to study gene expression and other biological problems has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences one of the highest honors given to a scientist or engineer in the United States More Tags Eric Siggia October 29 2008 Science News Simulator allows scientists to predict evolution s next best move In evolution even the slightest beginnings can lead to tools as complex as the human eye But how By modeling the steps evolution takes to build from scratch an adaptive biochemical network Rockefeller University scientists have provided a computational answer to one of Darwin s biggest questions More Tags Eric Siggia evolution February 28 2008 Science News Device allows scientists to control gene activity across generations of cells A group of biophysicists at Rockefeller University has developed a new tool that can control and measure more precisely than before the activity of genes and proteins within single budding yeast cells as they divide and multiply The device may yield new insight into the functioning of regulatory networks More Tags cell division Eric Siggia September 20 2007 Science News Sizing cells up Researchers pinpoint when a cell is ready to reproduce Like people cells must reach a certain size before they can reproduce A collaboration between Rockefeller University biologists physicists and mathematicians shows how and when cells reach this size requirement findings that provide researchers with a new quantitative framework to get to the core mechanisms involved in how a cell monitors its size More Tags cell division Eric Siggia January 4 2006 Science News New PhyloGibbs software helps scientists make sense

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/eric-siggia/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Laboratory of Genetics | Newswire
    response to temperature which can shift the clock forward or backward but cannot change its 24 hour period New experiments help explain how this is possible More Tags Center for Studies in Physics and Biology circadian clock Eric Siggia genetics and genomics Laboratory of Genetics Michael W Young molecular and cell biology Philip Kidd temperature compensation Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-genetics/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Michael W. Young | Newswire
    science The scientists will each receive 100 000 from the Gairdner Foundation More Tags Gairdner Award Jeffrey Ravetch Michael W Young January 27 2012 Science News Study in fruit flies reveals a gene affecting the ability to sleep Research suggests that a newly identified gene known as insomniac is an important reason why we get drowsy and fall asleep By cloning and testing this gene in fruit flies Rockefeller University researchers say they have discovered an entirely new mechanism by which sleep is regulated More Tags Michael W Young July 1 2009 Awards and Honors Michael Young receives Gruber Foundation s 2009 Neuroscience Prize Michael W Young Richard and Jeanne Fisher Professor and head of the Laboratory of Genetics at Rockefeller University has received the 2009 Neuroscience Prize of the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation for groundbreaking discoveries of the molecular mechanisms that control circadian rhythms in the nervous system More Tags Gruber Foundation Michael W Young August 13 2008 Science News A snooze button for the circadian clock Humans and most other organisms have 24 hour rhythms that are regulated by a precise molecular clock that ticks inside every cell A new study by Rockefeller University researchers shows how two molecules interact to regulate this clock s cycle and uncovers how that switch can go haywire identifying a potential cause of heritable sleep disorders More Tags circadian clock Michael W Young May 7 2007 Science News Single circadian clock regulates flies response to light and temperature Circadian rhythms allow animals to align their bodies to the earth s rotation Now new research shows that the same molecular clock that flies use to sync themselves to the sun s patterns is what allows them to sync to temperature patterns too More Tags circadian clock Michael W Young May 1 2007 Awards and Honors Libchaber and Young elected to National Academy of Sciences Two Rockefeller scientists are among 72 new members and 18 foreign associates from 12 countries who were chosen for distinguished and continuing achievements in original research More Tags Albert J Libchaber Michael W Young U S National Academy of Sciences January 11 2006 Science News New research shows how proteins make biological clock tick By looking inside a single cell and following two different proteins over several hours Rockefeller scientists have turned the old model of the cellular circadian clock on its head When the two proteins come together the scientists say they create a six hour timer that appears to tightly regulate the cell s circadian rhythm More Tags circadian clock FRET Michael W Young February 20 2004 Science News Biological clock scientist takes on VP for Academic Affairs position at Rockefeller University on March 1 Rockefeller University scientist Michael W Young who investigates the genetic pathways that enable the body s biological clock to tick will become Rockefeller University s Vice President for Academic Affairs on March 1 More Tags Michael W Young July 10 1998 Science News Scientists Identify New Gene That Controls Sleep Wake

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/michael-w-young/ (2016-02-13)
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