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  • Natural-born killers enlisted to fight anthrax | Newswire
    because unlike antibiotics this kind of therapy would not kill off useful bacteria in our bodies and thus would have few or no side effects The researchers also tested the enzyme on mice infected with a non infectious close cousin strain of anthrax called Bacillus cereus All mice die within four hours of being infected with this pathogen But when the researchers injected a dose of the new enzyme into the abdominal cavity of the mice 15 minutes after they were infected with B cereus also through injection into the abdominal cavity 70 to 80 percent of them lived This similar strain of anthrax was chosen for study because it is easier to work with and therefore produced quicker results Moreover studies with this cousin strain could be performed in Fischetti s laboratory at Rockefeller while studies on the more dangerous strains of anthrax itself including the Ames strain were tested at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta Ga and the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Aberdeen Md Medicine and tool In addition to treating anthrax infections the new enzyme could potentially be used as both a decontaminant of anthrax infected areas and as part of a hand held anthrax detection device says Fischetti These latter applications depend on the ability of this enzyme to detect anthrax spores When anthrax is not busy infecting its human or animal hosts it slips into a state of nearly permanent slumber assuming the form of tough infectious particles called spores These spores can lie dormant for hundreds of years only when they sense the presence of a new host will they wake up or germinate and start reproducing In the Nature report the researchers show that this enzyme can be used in combination with a germinating agent to wipe out spores The germinating agent called L alanine tricks the anthrax into thinking it s time to wake up But before these sleepy bacteria have a chance realize they ve been duped the phage enzyme goes to work killing them almost instantaneously Fischetti says that this lethal combination of enzyme and germinating agent could be used to both detect and eliminate spores that may lurk in mailrooms or subway stations in addition to those stubborn few that might remain hidden in people s noses Old strategy reinvented The idea of using phage to fight bacterial infections is not new Beginning in the 1930s Soviet physicians employed whole phage also referred to as phage therapy to treat a variety of bacterial infections with moderate success However bacteria develop resistance to phage as they do to antibiotics eventually rendering the treatment ineffective Fischetti s new approach of using solely an enzyme derived from the phage gets around this obstacle This particular enzyme which is known as a lysin helps newly assembled phage to escape from the bacteria by chewing up an essential cell wall bond in effect punching holes in the bacteria s outer barrier which then causes it to explode Thus for the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2002/08/21/natural-born-killers-enlisted-to-fight-anthrax/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Anthrax | Newswire
    anthrax causing bacteria work synergistically with viruses to extend each other s life spans The work puts scientists on a new playing field in the fight against biological warfare and antibiotic resistance and also calls into question the degree to which our genomes are the sole masters of our fates More Tags Anthrax January 25 2008 Science News Structural study of anthrax yields new antibiotic target By describing the structure of an enzyme involved in building an essential piece of the bacterium s cell wall Rockefeller University researchers have found a promising new drug target for anthrax and other bacteria More Tags Anthrax C Erec Stebbins April 21 2006 Science News Newly discovered protein kills Anthrax bacteria by exploding their cell walls A newly discovered protein called PlyPH specifically targets one of our most feared bioterror threats the anthrax bacterium by punching holes in its cell wall and exploding it Scientists at Rockefeller say the protein has several advantages over antibiotic drugs and a solution based on it could clean areas that have been contaminated with anthrax spores More Tags Anthrax Vincent A Fischetti August 21 2002 Science News Natural born killers enlisted to fight anthrax Researchers at The Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/anthrax/ (2016-02-13)
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  • bacteriophage | Newswire
    by viruses that attack them known as phage More Tags Anthrax bacteriophage C Erec Stebbins lysin MRSA Vincent A Fischetti May 23 2003 Science News Bacteria eating viruses may spread some infectious diseases A strep infected child in a daycare center plays with a toy puts it in her mouth and crawls away Another child plays with the same toy and comes down with strep More Tags bacteriophage Vincent A Fischetti August 21 2002 Science News Natural born killers enlisted to fight anthrax Researchers at The Rockefeller University have hit upon a promising method for rapidly and effectively treating people infected with the deadly anthrax bacterium including feared drug resistant strains The new research reported in the August 22 issue of Nature takes advantage of anthrax s number one natural enemy bateriophage or bacteria eating viruses More Tags Anthrax bacteriophage Vincent Fischetti December 6 2001 Science News Novel Method To Fight Drug resistant Infections Emerges from Lab and Nature Scientists have turned to nature once again for help in fighting deadly infections Reporting in the Dec 7 issue of Science Rockefeller University researchers show that a natural enzyme derived from tiny viruses that live inside bacteria can successfully target and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/bacteriophage/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Rockefeller fellow receives NIH ‘early independence award’ to study immune responses with high throughput sequencing | Newswire
    of the Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease At Rockefeller Rosenberg utilized high throughput sequencing to approach the study of RNA editing He discovered many new targets for an enzyme that edits RNA and developed a curiosity for other ways high throughput sequencing could be used to answer questions in biology As the technology becomes more advanced and less expensive I see a huge untapped potential in high throughput sequencing says Rosenberg I m interested in developing tools that go beyond standard genome and transcriptome sequencing We can apply the technology in ways that not only determine genetic sequences but also provide information about biological function As a presidential fellow his research will center on the complex populations of the immune system s T and B cells and the receptors by which they engage their targets In order to protect against the virtually limitless number of bacterial and viral pathogens our bodies might encounter these immune cells employ a remarkable mechanism by which they shuffle specialized pieces of their genomes like a deck of cards giving them the ability to generate extremely diverse receptors to recognize potential threats Rosenberg plans to develop new high throughput sequencing methods with which to analyze these receptor sequences and associated cellular functions in the context of different immune responses It s a novel approach that he believes will yield a more comprehensive picture of the T and B cell repertoire exceeding tens of millions of cells but with the ability to also look at each individual cell s genetic sequence and functional program up close The early phases will involve technology development and the ultimate goal is to transition the work to look at human responses autoimmune disease and vaccine development for example says Rosenberg Having Rockefeller s research hospital on campus will be

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/10/01/rockefeller-fellow-receives-nih-early-independence-award-to-study-immune-responses-with-high-throughput-sequencing/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Brad Rosenberg | Newswire
    D Ph D program Brad Rosenberg is one of 14 early career investigators across the country to receive an NIH Director s Early Independence Award a five year 2 1 million grant that will allow him to establish his own research program at Rockefeller More Tags Brad Rosenberg Director s Award Early Independence NIH Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/brad-rosenberg/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Director’s Award | Newswire
    D Ph D program Brad Rosenberg is one of 14 early career investigators across the country to receive an NIH Director s Early Independence Award a five year 2 1 million grant that will allow him to establish his own research program at Rockefeller More Tags Brad Rosenberg Director s Award Early Independence NIH Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/directors-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Titia de Lange receives NIH Pioneer Award | Newswire
    support for groundbreaking high risk research that if successful will have a significant impact de Lange is one of 13 recipients de Lange s award will fund several new experiments designed to address questions surrounding how a cell responds when its DNA is damaged what are the signals that occur in the event of DNA damage how does the cell sense this signal and how are those sensors and the DNA repair machinery connected The continuity of life depends on the ability of cells to protect their DNA from damage says de Lange the Leon Hess Professor and head of the Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics Any deficiencies in the DNA damage response can contribute to tumorigenesis aspects of aging and hereditary disorders This year s awardees were selected from among 840 initial applicants The Pioneer Award is a key component of the NIH roadmap for Medical Research a series of far reaching initiatives designed to transform the nation s medical research and speed the movement of research discoveries from the bench to the bedside The scientists we recognize with Pioneer Awards have far ranging ideas that hold the potential to make truly extraordinary contributions to many fields of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2005/09/29/titia-de-lange-receives-nih-pioneer-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • In the News – Xconomy – Darnell | Newswire
    The answers to so many questions are at scientists fingertips but finding them is a huge undertaking Robert Darnell s lab at Rockefeller University for instance was getting swamped by data The best way to overcome that problem Work together Tags Robert B Darnell newswire rockefeller edu New antibody therapy dramatically improves psoriasis symptoms in clinical trial Scientists pinpoint molecule that controls stem cell plasticity by boosting gene expression Comments

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/03/16/in-the-news-xconomy-darnell/ (2016-02-13)
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