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  • Michel C. Nussenzweig | Newswire
    infection in mice for a 60 day period longer than current antiretroviral drugs which require daily application The antibodies which suppressed the virus when used in combination could one day be given to humans to treat the disease More Tags antibodies Florian Klein HIV Michel C Nussenzweig February 7 2012 Research Update Nature online February 7 2012 Nature online February 7 2012 DNA damage defines sites of recurrent chromosomal translocations in B lymphocytes Ofir Hakim Wolfgang Resch Arito Yamane Isaac Klein Kyong Rim Kieffer Kwon Mila Jankovic Thiago Oliveira Anne Bothmer Ty C Voss Camilo Ansarah Sobrinho Ewy Mathe Genqing More Tags Michel C Nussenzweig December 9 2011 Awards and Honors 2011 Nobel Prize Ceremony to be webcast live Tomorrow the family of Nobel Prize winner Ralph M Steinman who died September 30 will accept the Nobel medal and diploma on his behalf from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden The ceremony will be Webcast live beginning at 10 20 a m Eastern Time A video of the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony will also be available a few days later More Tags Michel C Nussenzweig nobel prize Ralph M Steinman December 1 2011 Science News Resident protection To keep the body safe the immune system enlists more than one form of protection Rockefeller University scientists working in collaboration with researchers at New York University are learning about an important but little known network of dendritic cells in lymph nodes through innovative live action imaging More Tags dendritic cells Michel C Nussenzweig Ralph M Steinman July 19 2011 Science News Scientists identify broad and potent HIV antibodies that mimic CD4 binding A new approach gives researchers the ability to isolate single antibodies as well as investigate entire families of highly active antibodies against HIV More Tags Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center Brian T Chait David D Ho Michel C Nussenzweig May 3 2011 Awards and Honors Michel C Nussenzweig elected to National Academy of Sciences Michel C Nussenzweig Sherman Fairchild Professor and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences at the Academy s annual meeting today in recognition of his deep contributions to our understanding of the workings of the innate and adaptive immune systems More Tags dendritic cells Michel C Nussenzweig Ralph M Steinman November 9 2010 Science News New class of dancing dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes The discovery of a new class of dendritic cells that stem from blood monocytes in mice promises to accelerate research into clinical therapies that use these cells known to be the sentinels of the immune system Much research has been done on classical dendritic cells which are found in the lymph tissues of mice But these are hard to come by in the case of humans The new technique may allow the generation of authentic dendritic cells from human blood samples however which could make it much easier to advance dendritic cell based vaccines and cancer treatments that are under development

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/michel-c-nussenzweig/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Michel Nussenzweig | Newswire
    antibody selection study shows In response to an infection the immune system refines its defensive proteins called antibodies to better target the invader New research has revealed two mechanisms that favor the selection of B cells capable of producing antibodies finely tuned to target that invader More Tags affinity maturation Alex Gitlin antibodies B cell selection germinal centers immune response Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Michel Nussenzweig June 18 2015 Science News Sequential immunizations could be the key to HIV vaccine Scientists have thought for some time that multiple immunizations each tailored to specific stages of the immune response could be used to generate a special class of HIV fighting antibodies so called broadly neutralizing antibodies These findings provide the first evidence supporting this approach More Tags antigen broadly neutralizing antibodies HIV vaccine immune response Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Lotta von Boehmer Michel Nussenzweig Pia Dosenovic April 9 2015 In the News In the News BBC Nussenzweig HIV new approach against virus holds promise Michel Nussenzweig of The Rockefeller University told BBC News This is different to treatment out there already on two counts First because it comes from a human so it is natural More Tags AIDS HIV Michel Nussenzweig

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/michel-nussenzweig/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Sohail Tavazoie | Newswire
    cells sort out the RNA molecules destined to become gene regulating microRNAs by tagging them Because microRNAs help control processes throughout the body this discovery has wide ranging implications for development health and disease including cancer More Tags cancer Claudio Alarcón Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology m6A METTL3 microRNA RNA Sohail Tavazoie January 26 2015 Science News Research implicates metabolic process of the liver in the spread of colorectal cancer By identifying genes that become activated in cancer cells that successfully metastasize to the liver researchers at Rockefeller have implicated metabolic processes within the liver as a possible means by which starving transient cancer cells can go on to form deadly new colonies More Tags cancer Colorectal cancer Elizabeth and Vincent Meyer Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology metastasis microRNA Sohail Tavazoie January 16 2015 Campus News Cancer biologist and physician Sohail Tavazoie is promoted to associate professor Tavazoie who joined Rockefeller in 2009 works to understand how cancer cells become able to escape a tumor and invade other organs a process known as metastasis He searches for genes and molecular pathways cancer cells exploit in order to metastasize and with that knowledge hopes to develop future treatments to prevent or interfere with the process More Tags associate professor breast cancer cancer colon cancer Elizabeth and Vincent Meyer Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology endothelial cells melanoma metastasis microRNA promotion RNA Sohail Tavazoie July 28 2014 Science News Discovery of pro metastasis protein reveals mysterious link to neurodegeneration Mice injected with metastatic breast cancer cells showed less metastasis when researchers silenced the protein TARBP2 in these cells TARBP2 appears to promote metastasis in part by blocking suppressor genes including two linked with neurodegeneration More Tags cancer metastasis neurodegeneration RNA Sohail Tavazoie TARBP2 July 9 2014 In the News In the News Daily Mail UK Tavazoie How spread of breast cancer could be stopped Professor Sohail Tavazoie who led the research said If we learn more about how this regulation works we may in the future be able to generate drugs that prevent this protein from More Tags cancer Sohail Tavazoie TARBP2 April 2 2014 Science News Drug is identified that could block the spread of melanoma Researchers have found a promising new route to slowing or even preventing melanoma cells from spreading within the body Using a compound that targets a hormone receptor the team found they could reduce tumors recruitment of blood vessels a process necessary for metastasis More Tags cancer melanoma metastasis Sohail Tavazoie March 10 2014 Awards and Honors Nora Pencheva wins 2014 Weintraub Graduate Student Award Pencheva a graduate fellow in Sohail Tavazoie s Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology is one of 13 recipients of this prestigious award Her thesis project explores the molecular biology of metastatic melanoma the most deadly type of skin cancer More Tags Nora Pencheva Sohail Tavazoie Weintraub Graduate Student Award December 16 2011 Science News In cancer molecular signals that recruit blood vessels also trigger metastasis Cancer cells are most deadly when they

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/sohail-tavazoie/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newly described ion channel structure reveals how excited neurons settle down | Newswire
    Slo2 2 contributes to the normal function of neurons in the brain and elsewhere MacKinnon adds The research was published October 5 in Nature The signals that transmit information in the nervous system are generated by electrically charged atoms moving into and out of neurons Typically when a neuron fires positively charged sodium rushes into the cell generating a pulse of electrical activity that subsides as positively charged potassium floods out In certain circumstances electrical impulses in the nervous system must be transmitted at a high frequency But too high a frequency for too long can give rise to uncontrolled electrical activity as seen in epilepsy and can damage cells For this reason mechanisms have evolved to put a protective break on the process Slo2 2 underlies one such protective mechanism The Slo2 2 ion channel does this by opening in response to the very sodium that enters the cell during an electrical impulse When it opens Slo2 2 allows potassium to flow out of the cell thus restoring the cell s internal electrical state It is not the only channel through which potassium travels however ions flow through Slo2 2 at ten times the rate of most other potassium channels Mutations in the gene that encodes Slo2 2 have been linked with intellectual disabilities and epilepsy For about a decade researchers in the MacKinnon lab have been working to decipher the ion channel s structure to better understand how it functions under normal circumstances and in disease First author Richard Hite a postdoc in the lab took on the task of crystallizing the protein with the intent of mapping all of its atoms The structure of some proteins can be determined using a method known as X ray crystallography which involves shooting high energy x rays at a crystallized protein and detecting the pattern produced when the rays bounce off the molecules within the crystal But the Slo2 2 protein resisted crystallization perhaps because of its large size so Hite decided to try a new structural biology approach called cryo electron microscopy EM Cryo EM relies on rapidly freezing a molecule in many random orientations rather than coaxing it into a crystal Hite carried out computations using about 25 000 independent images of the Slo2 2 channel each providing a different perspective and used these to build a three dimensional model of the molecule s shape Within a year the researchers had obtained a full structure for Slo2 2 in its closed state They uncovered a channel with four fold symmetry Inside the cell where a potassium ion s path begins two regulator domains from each of four subunits form a gating ring which must open in order for potassium to pass This ring in turn creates a massive funnel when the channel is closed the tip of this funnel is blocked With this discovery the researchers were able to better understand how Slo2 2 conducts ions so rapidly When they mapped out the electrical charges across the channel

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/10/05/newly-described-ion-channel-structure-reveals-how-excited-neurons-settle-down/ (2016-02-13)
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  • ion channel | Newswire
    ion channels open to allow the flow of charged atoms called ions across the cell membrane The opening of voltage dependent ion channels is mediated by voltage sensors which contain charged amino acids that move within the membrane in response to voltage changes Now new research from Rockefeller University reveals how these charged amino acids are stabilized on voltage sensor paddles and how they move within the lipid membrane More Tags ion channel Roderick MacKinnon December 6 2006 Science News Ion channels are key to estrogen s effect on neurons Despite being one of the body s best studied hormones there s still a lot we don t know about estrogens Now by studying how these sex hormones impact brain cells at the biophysical level scientists at Rockefeller University say they exert their powerful effects on behavior in part by affecting the speed at which ion channels in the cell membrane of a neuron open and close More Tags Donald W Pfaff ion channel April 30 2003 Science News MacKinnon lab s newest picture tells action potential story Scientists studying the tiny devices called voltage dependent ion channels that are responsible for all nerve and muscle signals in living organisms for 50 years have been working like a bunch of blindfolded art critics More Tags ion channel Roderick MacKinnon January 21 2003 Science News Hardworking sodium potassium pump fundamentally similar to free flowing ion channel Right now in your body tiny pumps in the fatty membranes surrounding all your cells are hard at work pushing select charged ions such as sodium potassium or calcium through those membranes Like a water pump in a high rise apartment building overcoming the force of gravity to move water up to a tank on its roof these ion pumps work against electrochemical gradients to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/ion-channel/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology and Biophysics | Newswire
    More Tags chemical and structural biology ion channel Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology and Biophysics neurosciences and behavior Richard Hite Roderick MacKinnon Slo2 2 December 3 2014 Science News Atomic level view provides new insight into translation of touch into nerve signals An ion channel responsible for dampening potentially painful sensations uses a never before seen mechanism to shut itself off A lipid from the nearby cellular membrane protrudes into the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-molecular-neurobiology-and-biophysics/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Richard Hite | Newswire
    at too high a frequency for too long which has the potential to damage the cells With the new information about Slo2 2 s configuration researchers can better understand how it accomplishes this More Tags chemical and structural biology ion channel Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology and Biophysics neurosciences and behavior Richard Hite Roderick MacKinnon Slo2 2 Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/richard-hite/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Roderick MacKinnon | Newswire
    Ion channels are small passageways that control the movement of electrically charged particles across a cell s membrane Now new research reveals the thermodynamics behind how one type of ion channel determines which particles to let through More Tags ion flow membrane channels Roderick MacKinnon February 16 2007 Science News Phospholipids in the cell membrane help regulate ion channels Though the cell membrane is a protective barrier it also plays a role in letting some foreign material in via ion channels that dot the cell s surface Now new research from the Nobel Prize winning laboratory that first solved the atomic structure of several such channels shows that their function is controlled in part by a complex interaction between a channel s voltage sensor and the cell membrane immediately adjacent to it More Tags phospholipids Roderick MacKinnon October 8 2003 Science News Nobel Prize honors Rockefeller University scientist Roderick MacKinnon for revealing process of electrical signaling in humans and other living organisms Rockefeller University Professor Roderick MacKinnon M D a biophysicist and X ray crystallographer whose exquisitely detailed portraits of a class of proteins explain the generation of nerve impulses the electrical activity that underlies all movement sensation and thought is honored this year with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm Sweden announced today MacKinnon who also is an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute shares the prize with Peter Agre M D at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine More Tags nobel prize Roderick MacKinnon April 30 2003 Science News MacKinnon lab s newest picture tells action potential story Scientists studying the tiny devices called voltage dependent ion channels that are responsible for all nerve and muscle signals in living organisms for 50 years have been working like a bunch of blindfolded art critics

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/roderick-mackinnon/ (2016-02-13)
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