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  • Finches offer researchers a new tool to study Huntington’s disease | Newswire
    Because Huntington s is determined by a single gene Liu was able to easily isolate its effects on the birds Liu s team introduced the mHTT gene into eggs then screened the chicks for the mutation once they hatched The birds that had it were then used to breed successive generations in whom the genetic mutation occurred naturally That way the researchers could ensure that each bird developed the disease as it would manifest in humans As they grew the transgenic finches all began to display the behavior disorders associated with Huntington s such as tremors sometimes seen in patients Most of the mutant males the singing sex had problems learning their songs while young and once fully grown produced aberrant songs Liu carefully selected the birds that appeared the most vocally impaired For example some of the birds stuttered Liu says If the normal song was ABCDE these mutant birds could only sing AAAA Using specialized computer software Liu was able to monitor subtle changes in these finches song as their muscular degradation progressed providing detailed records of how vocal patterns were affected This kind of progressive speech impairment is associated with dysfunction in the cortical basal ganglia brain circuit in both humans and songbirds so Liu could make assumptions based on this trial about how the human brain circuit changes His results are the clearest findings to date as to how this kind of neurodegeneration occurs His project builds upon a history of studies of song learning at Rockefeller During more than two decades at Rockefeller Peter Marler a leader in the field examined the interplay between the inborn program for song in young birds and the influence of social factors uncovering parallels to speech acquisition in human babies Meanwhile Nottebohm studied the neural circuits responsible for song

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/10/05/finches-offer-researchers-a-new-tool-to-study-huntingtons-disease/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Fernando Nottebohm | Newswire
    out a method for altering the genes of the zebra finch one of the handful of social animals that learn to speak in a way that is analogous to humans More Tags Fernando Nottebohm Songbirds July 23 2009 Science News Songbirds elaborate cries for food show first signs of vocal learning How a handful of social animals ever learned to actively style their vocal communication is a question that has dogged biologists for generations New research in chipping sparrows suggests that the talent originally appeared in these songbirds as a competition for food among siblings and later evolved into vocal imitation used in territorial defense and courtship More Tags Fernando Nottebohm Songbirds vocal learning October 23 2006 Science News Study of birds suggests method of learning affects how the brain adds neurons By comparing birds raised in isolation with those raised communally Rockefeller University scientists say that learning by improvisation is associated with greater neuronal turnover and more mental flexibility than learning by imitation More Tags cognitive development Fernando Nottebohm March 1 2006 Awards and Honors Rockefeller neurobiologist to receive Benjamin Franklin Medal Rockefeller University s Fernando Nottebohm will receive the 2006 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Life Science The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia announced today The medal recognizes Nottebohm s discovery of neuronal replacement in the adult vertebrate brain and the elaboration of the mechanism and choreography of this phenomenon More Tags Benjamin Franklin Medal Fernando Nottebohm May 24 2005 Science News One gene links newborn neurons with those that die in diseases such as Alzheimer s In certain parts of the brain cells called neurons go through a cycle of death and replenishment New research from Rockefeller University s Fernando Nottebohm Ph D shows that these replaceable neurons share something in common with the neurons that die in people

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/fernando-nottebohm/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Huntington’s disease | Newswire
    can t tell scientists much about speech disorders However a new study shows how songbirds specifically zebra finches may be able to aid research on neurodegenerative disorders that affect speech and vocalization More Tags Fernando Nottebohm Huntington s disease Laboratory of Animal Behavior neurodegeneration neurosciences and behavior Wan chun Liu Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/huntingtons-disease/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Laboratory of Animal Behavior | Newswire
    speech and vocalization More Tags Fernando Nottebohm Huntington s disease Laboratory of Animal Behavior neurodegeneration neurosciences and behavior Wan chun Liu April 11 2011 Awards and Honors Fernando Nottebohm to receive Sackler Prize Rockefeller University s Fernando Nottebohm will receive The Mortimer D Sackler Prize for Distinguished Achievement in Developmental Psychobiology in recognition of his seminal work in songbirds that has led to the discovery of neuronal replacement More Tags

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/laboratory-of-animal-behavior/ (2016-02-13)
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  • neurodegeneration | Newswire
    a protective effect in the set of neurons most affected by this degenerative disease When the activity of these molecules wanes disease sets in This discovery suggests new avenues for preventing or treating Parkinson s More Tags dopamine neurons Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Lars Brichta neurodegeneration Parkinson s disease Paul Greengard SNpc VTA July 28 2014 Science News Discovery of pro metastasis protein reveals mysterious link to neurodegeneration Mice injected with metastatic breast cancer cells showed less metastasis when researchers silenced the protein TARBP2 in these cells TARBP2 appears to promote metastasis in part by blocking suppressor genes including two linked with neurodegeneration More Tags cancer metastasis neurodegeneration RNA Sohail Tavazoie TARBP2 May 24 2005 Science News One gene links newborn neurons with those that die in diseases such as Alzheimer s In certain parts of the brain cells called neurons go through a cycle of death and replenishment New research from Rockefeller University s Fernando Nottebohm Ph D shows that these replaceable neurons share something in common with the neurons that die in people with diseases such as Alzheimer s and Parkinson s both have unusually low levels of a protein called UCHL1 More Tags Alzheimer s disease Fernando Nottebohm neurodegeneration May 3 2002 Science News Leprosy bug provides clues to early nerve degeneration In the May 3 issue of Science scientists at Rockefeller University and New York University School of Medicine report that the nerve damage that leads to a loss of sensation and disability of people with leprosy occurs in the early stages of infection More Tags Anura Rambukkana degeneration leprosy nerve damage neurodegeneration August 20 1997 Science News Mutated Gene Causes Death of Nerves in Brain A gene responsible for the degeneration and death of certain nerve cells in the brain has been cloned

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/neurodegeneration/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Researchers probe the physical forces involved in creating the mitotic spindle | Newswire
    other akin to train tracks they naturally move shift and overlap Around the spindle s center they mostly exist in an anti parallel configuration in which their plus and minus ends point in opposite directions towards its poles the parallel configuration prevails in which their plus and minus ends point in the same direction In order to segregate chromosomes into the two emerging cells the spindle itself needs a bipolar structure and so the microtubules must be sorted to align with the long pole to pole axis of the spindle This job is accomplished by kinesin 5 which can bind to two overlapping microtubules linking them like a bar in the letter H and directing them to the appropriate locations For this study the researchers took a detailed look at the physical forces generated by the motor protein as it helps organize the mitotic spindle To do the sorting kinesin 5 can link two anti parallel microtubules pushing them in opposite directions so their minus ends move away from the spindle s center and toward the spindle s poles The force exerted by kinesin 5 in that process hasn t been previously measured By shining a laser light on a microscopic sized plastic bead attached to a pair of microtubules linked by kinesin 5 molecules the team tracked their activity and discovered that this force is a function of the microtubule overlap the longer the overlap the greater the force This is a way by which the cell can tune the amount of force it needs in order to build a nice balanced spindle structure Forth says Kinesin 5 can also link parallel microtubules and the researchers found that in this case it behaves differently Rather than producing a pushing force it generates a resisting force that can slow down

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/10/02/researchers-probe-the-physical-forces-involved-in-creating-the-mitotic-spindle/ (2016-02-13)
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  • cell division | Newswire
    the decision to divide it faces a formidable task synchronizing the activity of hundreds of genes and proteins so that two daughter cells can be born Now Rockefeller University researchers show that a positive feedback loop helps keep these events in sync a finding that has eluded scientists for decades More Tags cell division Frederick R Cross June 30 2008 Science News Dividing cells find their middle by following a protein contour map Self organization keeps schools of fish flocks of birds and colonies of termites in sync It s also according to new research the way cells regulate the final stage of cell division Scientists at Rockefeller University have shown that a protein chemistry based contour map which helps individual proteins locate the center of their cell without direction from a master organizer is key to ensuring accurate division during mitosis More Tags cell division Tarun Kapoor February 28 2008 Science News Device allows scientists to control gene activity across generations of cells A group of biophysicists at Rockefeller University has developed a new tool that can control and measure more precisely than before the activity of genes and proteins within single budding yeast cells as they divide and multiply The device may yield new insight into the functioning of regulatory networks More Tags cell division Eric Siggia January 18 2008 Science News Mammalian protein plays unexpected role in cell division and perhaps cancer In yeast the protein Tel2 regulates the length of telomeres DNA sequences that protect the ends of linear chromosomes But in humans and mice Tel2 does nothing of the sort Instead researchers at Rockefeller University are the first to show that mammalian Tel2 prevents the degradation of a family of six proteins that primarily regulate cell division and proliferation an unexpected role that may be linked to cancer More Tags cell division telomeres Titia de Lange September 20 2007 Science News Sizing cells up Researchers pinpoint when a cell is ready to reproduce Like people cells must reach a certain size before they can reproduce A collaboration between Rockefeller University biologists physicists and mathematicians shows how and when cells reach this size requirement findings that provide researchers with a new quantitative framework to get to the core mechanisms involved in how a cell monitors its size More Tags cell division Eric Siggia July 30 2007 Science News Chromosomes are responsible for a critical enzyme s activation during cell division The microtubule structures that chromosomes use to migrate to opposite ends of a cell must have impeccable timing They need to materialize when chromosomes are present then dissipate when they re no longer needed Now new research suggests that the enzyme Aurora B is the reason that the microtubules show up on time More Tags cell division Hironori Funabiki January 24 2006 Science News Hitchhiking chromosomes yield new theory of cell division From the moment the cell was discovered scientists have been dissecting the methodical multi step process by which they duplicate themselves This week Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/cell-division/ (2016-02-13)
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  • kinesin-5 | Newswire
    is the molecular machine that divides up genetic material prior to cell division Their work focuses on the motor protein kinesin 5 which helps to organize the spindle s filaments More Tags cell division kinesin 5 Laboratory of Chemistry and Cell Biology mitotic spindle molecular and cell biology Scott Forth Tarun Kapoor Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/kinesin-5/ (2016-02-13)
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