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  • Rockefeller neurobiology lab is awarded first-round BRAIN initiative grant | Newswire
    one of four federal agencies involved in the BRAIN Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative Following in the ambitious footsteps of the Human Genome Project the BRAIN initiative seeks to create a dynamic map of the brain in action a goal that requires the development of new technologies The BRAIN initiative working group which outlined the broad scope of the ambitious project was co chaired by Rockefeller s Cori Bargmann head of the Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior Stanley s grant for 1 26 million over three years is one of 58 projects to get BRAIN grants the NIH announced The NIH s plan for its part of this national project which has been pitched as America s next moonshot calls for 4 5 billion in federal funds over 12 years BRAIN control The new technology uses radio waves to activate or silence cells remotely The bright spots above represent cells with increased calcium after treatment with radio waves a change that would allow neurons to fire The technology Stanley is developing would enable researchers to manipulate the activity of neurons as well as other cell types in freely moving animals in order to better understand what these cells do Other techniques for controlling selected groups of neurons exist but her new nanoparticle based technique has a unique combination of features that may enable new types of experimentation For instance it would allow researchers to rapidly activate or silence neurons within a small area of the brain or dispersed across a larger region including those in difficult to access locations Stanley also plans to explore the potential this method has for use treating patients Francis Collins director of the NIH has discussed the need for studying the circuitry of the brain which is formed by interconnected neurons Our

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/10/07/rockefeller-neurobiology-lab-is-awarded-first-round-brain-initiative-grant/ (2016-02-13)
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  • radiogenetics | Newswire
    mice More Tags BRAIN Initiative ferritin Jeffrey M Friedman Laboratory of Molecular Genetics magnetic field radio waves radiogenetics remote control Sarah Stanley October 7 2014 Awards and Honors Rockefeller neurobiology lab is awarded first round BRAIN initiative grant Researchers are developing a technology that uses radio waves or magnetic fields to turn neurons on or off remotely This tool may allow them to study the role of neural circuits in

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/radiogenetics/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Sarah Stanley | Newswire
    mice More Tags BRAIN Initiative ferritin Jeffrey M Friedman Laboratory of Molecular Genetics magnetic field radio waves radiogenetics remote control Sarah Stanley October 7 2014 Awards and Honors Rockefeller neurobiology lab is awarded first round BRAIN initiative grant Researchers are developing a technology that uses radio waves or magnetic fields to turn neurons on or off remotely This tool may allow them to study the role of neural circuits in

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/sarah-stanley/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Genetically driven gut feelings help female flies choose a mate | Newswire
    female flies paused in response to a male suitor s dance When the Adb B gene is silenced the female s movement is continuous In choosing their mates male and female flies take part in an elaborate courtship ritual Until recently researchers have primarily focused on the showier behavior of the males who actively court females through pursuit and song extending a single wing and tapping out notes of woo to potential mates Because the male courtship routine was obviously complex it had been thought that the female s role was passive the researchers say But it turns out there is much more going on The Rockefeller team took a detailed look at what constitutes female receptivity First the female fly must slow down periodically to allow the pursuing male to catch up a behavior the researchers called pausing Second she must open the vaginal plates of her exoskeleton to allow access to her genitalia To determine which genes control this behavior the researchers employed a technique called RNA interference they used small segments of RNA to silence individual genes throughout the entire fly genome but did so only in neural cells In silencing a gene researchers can see the effect of that gene on the organism much like flipping the circuit breaker on an unlabeled electrical panel to see which lights turn off in a house Using a strain of fly that allowed them to easily assess neuronal behavior the researchers were able to link Abd B activation to a set of 150 neurons connected primarily to the genitalia and the abdominal ganglion a cluster of nerves found at the bottom of the Drosophila nerve cord which is a structure roughly analogous to the human spinal column These Abd B neurons they found were crucial to the pause response

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/07/08/genetically-driven-gut-feelings-help-female-flies-choose-a-mate/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Drosophila melanogaster | Newswire
    feelings help female flies choose a mate Researchers at Rockefeller University have determined that the Abdominal B Abd B gene previously known as the gene that sculpts the posterior parts of the developing fly is also important for a complex courtship behavior at least in the case of female flies More Tags Drosophila melanogaster Leslie B Vosshall neuroscience RNA interference October 18 2010 Science News New faculty member wants to know how flies make decisions Gaby Maimon who will join the university on January 1 has developed a unique system for studying the neural basis for decision making in fruit flies By using fluorescence microscopy and glass capillaries pulled to ultrafine tips Maimon records the electrical activity of specific neurons in the fly brain as it flies allowing him to understand what s going on as the fly is exposed to and reacts to various stimuli More Tags Drosophila melanogaster Gaby Maimon September 17 2007 Science News New cell death pathway involved in sperm development Good swimmers like healthy sperm are sleek and light They shed extra pounds shape their body and even shave their legs to move efficiently and fast Sperm also remove excess baggage to function optimally and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/drosophila-melanogaster/ (2016-02-13)
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  • RNA interference | Newswire
    Science News New RNA interference technique finds seven genes for head and neck cancer The technique created by scientists in Rockefeller s Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development attaches short pieces of RNA to highly concentrated viruses and uses ultrasound to inject the viruses into mouse embryos It takes a fraction of the resources and much less time than using knockout mice to conduct genetic screens and can assess about 300 genes in a single mouse in as little as five weeks More Tags cancer Elaine Fuchs head and neck cancer myosin IIa RNA interference August 14 2013 Science News New technique in RNA interference cuts time and cost in genetic screens Rockefeller scientists revealed the first genome wide RNA interference screen of a mouse using a new technique that essentially treats the surface of living mouse embryos as a petri dish of cells allowing for in vivo analysis More Tags Elaine Fuchs epidermis mllt6 RNA interference August 30 2012 Science News Researchers demonstrate how interfering RNA can block bacterial evolution Experiments in pneumococcal bacteria show how an RNA interference mechanism known as CRISPR can be used to prevent the uptake of genetic material from the environment Harnessing this

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/rna-interference/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Researchers profile active genes in neurons based on connections | Newswire
    techniques we are now able to take a closer look at the types of cells involved in a particular circuit and what they are doing In the long run these sorts of insights might help explain why some diseases such as Parkinson s Disease afflict particular sets of neurons or someday make it possible to precisely target treatments at a dysfunctional neural circuit rather than bathing the entire brain in drug The researchers modified a technique known as translating ribosome affinity purification TRAP developed at Rockefeller by Nathaniel Heintz Paul Greengard and others to identify gene expression using green fluorescent protein to tag protein assembling machines called ribosomes In research published today in Cell Ekstrand graduate student Alexander Nectow and colleagues describe how they used Retro TRAP to introduce green fluorescent protein to the neuron via a virus that travels backwards from a synapse into the body of a mouse neuron The researchers used a small antibody to link the ribosome with the fluorescent protein Then using these fluorescent tags the researchers pulled out the ribosomes and sequenced the genetic messages passing through them In this way they produced a list of active genes To test their technique the team focused on inputs to a well studied part of the brain the nucleus accumbens which integrates information from throughout the brain including regions involved in executive function memory depression reward related behavior feeding and other functions Nectow says We wanted to target a selected number of inputs into the nucleus accumbens because we figured we might be able to get some molecular clues as to why it is important in regulating so many functions Nectow says Using Retro TRAP they created molecular profiles of neurons extending from the hypothalamus and ventral midbrain that project to the nucleus accumbens The results

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/05/22/researchers-profile-active-genes-in-neurons-based-on-connections/ (2016-02-13)
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  • connectomics | Newswire
    to examine gene expression in neurons that send messages to a synapse A test run examined dopamine neurons that project to the brain region known as the nucleus accumbens More Tags connectomics gene expression Jeffrey M Friedman Neurons neuroscience Retro TRAP TRAP method Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/connectomics/ (2016-02-13)
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