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  • Staphylococci | Newswire
    help the microbes by lending them potentially useful genes New research shows Staph bacteria have an immune system capable of distinguishing dangerous invaders from potentially beneficial ones More Tags bacterial immune system CRISPR Gregory Goldberg Luciano Marraffini lysogenic virus lytic virus phages Staphylococci transcription Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/staphylococci/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Researchers master gene editing technique in mosquito that transmits deadly diseases | Newswire
    says Matthews is to learn more about how different genes help the species operate so efficiently as a disease vector and create new ways to control it To understand how the female mosquito actually transmits disease says Matthews you have to learn how she finds humans to bite and how she chooses a source of water to lay her eggs Once you have that information techniques for intervention will come In the study published March 26 in Cell Reports Matthews and research assistant Kathryn E Kistler both in Leslie B Vosshall s Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior adapted the CRISPR Cas9 system to introduce precise mutations in Ae aegypti Previously to create these types of mutations scientists relied on techniques that used engineered proteins to bind to specific segments of DNA they wanted to remove a process that was both expensive and unreliable CRISPR Cas9 in contrast consists of short stretches of RNA that bind to specific regions of the genome where a protein Cas9 cleaves the DNA Scientists have been studying how RNA binds to DNA for decades and the targeting is done with rules that we have a good handle on says Matthews which makes it easy to reprogram CRISPR Cas9 to target any gene This amazing technique has worked in nearly every organism that s been tried says Vosshall who is Robin Chemers Neustein Professor and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator There are lots of interesting animal species out there that could not be studied using genetics prior to CRISPR Cas9 and as a result this technique is already revolutionizing biology This work opens the door to learning more about the role of specific genes the Vosshall lab suspects may help mosquitoes propagate perhaps by finding the perfect spot to lay their eggs Their protocols will

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/03/26/researchers-master-gene-editing-technique-in-mosquito-that-transmits-deadly-diseases/ (2016-02-13)
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  • aedes aegypti | Newswire
    dengue fever More Tags aedes aegypti chikungunya CRISPR CRISPR Cas9 dengue fever gene editing Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Leslie Vosshall mosquitos yellow fever November 12 2014 Science News Research suggests how mosquitoes evolved an attraction to human scent To understand the evolutionary basis of the mosquito s attraction to humans scientists examined the genes that drive preferences of two different subspecies Their findings suggest that Aedes aegypti aegypti acquired a love for human body odor a key step in specializing on people More Tags aedes aegypti evolution Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Leslie Vosshall mosquitoes February 27 2014 Science News Research shows combination of sensory signals draw mosquitoes in for a bite Researchers used a genome editing technique to engineer a mutant version of the Aedes aegypti mosquito which spreads yellow fever The mutant was unable to detect carbon dioxide and studies showed that this hindered its ability to detect a host even in the presence of other sensory cues like heat and odor The results can help inform the design of chemical repellents to block host seeking behavior in both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae which spreads malaria More Tags aedes aegypti

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/aedes-aegypti/ (2016-02-13)
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  • chikungunya | Newswire
    in an important and understudied species the mosquito Aedes aegypti which infects hundreds of millions of people annually with the deadly diseases chikungunya yellow fever and dengue fever More Tags aedes aegypti chikungunya CRISPR CRISPR Cas9 dengue fever gene editing Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Leslie Vosshall mosquitos yellow fever Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/chikungunya/ (2016-02-13)
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  • CRISPR-Cas9 | Newswire
    in an important and understudied species the mosquito Aedes aegypti which infects hundreds of millions of people annually with the deadly diseases chikungunya yellow fever and dengue fever More Tags aedes aegypti chikungunya CRISPR CRISPR Cas9 dengue fever gene editing Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Leslie Vosshall mosquitos yellow fever Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/crispr-cas9/ (2016-02-13)
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  • dengue fever | Newswire
    February 27 2014 Science News Research shows combination of sensory signals draw mosquitoes in for a bite Researchers used a genome editing technique to engineer a mutant version of the Aedes aegypti mosquito which spreads yellow fever The mutant was unable to detect carbon dioxide and studies showed that this hindered its ability to detect a host even in the presence of other sensory cues like heat and odor The

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/dengue-fever/ (2016-02-13)
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  • yellow fever | Newswire
    deadly diseases chikungunya yellow fever and dengue fever More Tags aedes aegypti chikungunya CRISPR CRISPR Cas9 dengue fever gene editing Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior Leslie B Vosshall Leslie Vosshall mosquitos yellow fever February 27 2014 Science News Research shows combination of sensory signals draw mosquitoes in for a bite Researchers used a genome editing technique to engineer a mutant version of the Aedes aegypti mosquito which spreads yellow fever The mutant was unable to detect carbon dioxide and studies showed that this hindered its ability to detect a host even in the presence of other sensory cues like heat and odor The results can help inform the design of chemical repellents to block host seeking behavior in both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae which spreads malaria More Tags aedes aegypti dengue fever Leslie B Vosshall malaria mosquitoes yellow fever June 8 2010 Science News Researchers modify yellow fever vaccine to fight malaria A genetically modified vaccine originally used to eradicate yellow fever could be the key to stopping a mosquito borne scourge that afflicts much of the developing world More Tags Charles M Rice Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease malaria Michel C Nussenzweig yellow

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/yellow-fever/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Virus-cutting enzyme helps bacteria remember a threat | Newswire
    spacers form the memories of past invaders They serve as guides for enzymes encoded by CRISPR associated genes Cas which seek out and destroy those same viruses should they attempt to infect the bacterium again Cas9 s ability to make precision cuts within a genome viral or otherwise has caught the attention of researchers who now use it to alter cells genetics for experimental or therapeutic purposes But it is still not well understood just how this CRISPR system works in its native bacteria Some evidence suggested that other Cas enzymes managed the memory making process on their own without Cas9 But because of the way Cas9 goes about identifying the site at which to make a cut the researchers including co first authors Robert Heler a graduate student and Poulami Samai a postdoc in the lab suspected a role for Cas9 in memory making In addition to matching its CRISPR guide sequence up with the DNA of the virus Cas9 needs to find a second cue nearby a PAM protospacer adjacent motif sequence in the viral DNA This is a crucial step since it is the absence of a PAM sequence that prevents Cas9 from attacking the bacterium s own memory containing DNA Because Cas9 must recognize a PAM sequence before cutting the viral DNA it made sense to us that Cas9 would also recognize the PAM sequence when the system is forming a memory of its first encounter with a virus Heler says This is a new and unexpected role for Cas9 To test their hypothesis Heler swapped the Cas9 enzymes between the immune systems of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus thermophilus each of which recognizes a different PAM sequence As a result the PAM sequences followed swapping between the two bugs evidence that Cas9 is responsible for identifying

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/02/20/virus-cutting-enzyme-helps-bacteria-remember-a-threat/ (2016-02-13)
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