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  • m6A | Newswire
    More Tags Claudio Alarcón genetics and genomics Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology m6A microRNA RNA splicing Sohail Tavazoie March 24 2015 Science News Chemical tag marks future microRNAs for processing study shows New research reveals how cells sort out the RNA molecules destined to become gene regulating microRNAs by tagging them Because microRNAs help control processes throughout the body this discovery has wide ranging implications for development health and disease

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/m6a/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Expression of a single gene lets scientists easily grow hepatitis C virus in the lab | Newswire
    t understand about how the virus operates and how it interacts with liver cells and the immune system Scientists have long attempted to understand what makes HCV tick and in 1999 a group of German scientists succeeded in coaxing modified forms of the virus to replicate in cells in the laboratory However it was soon discovered that these forms of the virus were able to replicate because they had acquired certain adaptive mutations This was true for all samples from patients except one and left scientists with a puzzling question for more than a decade what prevents non mutated HCV from replicating in laboratory grown cell lines Rice and colleagues hypothesized that one or more critical elements might be missing in these cell lines To test this idea they screened a library of about 7 000 human genes to look for one whose expression would allow replication of non mutated HCV When the scientists expressed the gene SEC14L2 the virus replicated in its wild type non mutated form Even adding serum samples from HCV infected patients to these engineered cell lines resulted in virus replication Practically speaking this means that if scientists want to study HCV from an infected patient it s now possible to take a blood sample inoculate the engineered cells and grow that patient s form of the virus in the lab says first author Mohsan Saeed a postdoc in Rice s laboratory It s not entirely clear how the protein expressed by SEC14L2 works says Saeed but it appears to inhibit lipids from interacting with dangerous reactive oxygen species a process that prevents HCV replication Recent advances in HCV treatment have made it possible for millions of people to be cured of the virus New therapies however are extremely expensive and not perfect Saeed notes As

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/08/19/expression-of-a-single-gene-lets-scientists-easily-grow-hepatitis-c-virus-in-the-lab-2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • HCV | Newswire
    By Rockefeller University New York Presbyterian and Weill Cornell New York NY Three neighboring New York City medical institutions The Rockefeller University NewYork Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Medical College of Cornell University have jointly established the Center for the Study of Hepatitis C the first major center in the Northeast region devoted specifically to the disease Renowned virologist Charles M Rice Ph D who recently made the first infectious clone

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/hcv/ (2016-02-13)
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  • hepatitis C | Newswire
    infection More Tags hepatitis C National Institutes of Health January 28 2009 Science News Discovery could lead to a new animal model for hepatitis C The hepatitis C virus is interested in only one thing human liver cells That has been one of scientists greatest frustrations in their efforts to study the virus and has hampered the development of useful animal models for the disease But now in a major leap forward scientists have identified a protein that allows this uniquely human pathogen to enter mouse cells a finding that could lead to a vaccine or to new treatments More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C October 30 2008 Science News By imaging living cells researchers show how hepatitis C replicates The hepatitis C virus is a prolific replicator able to produce up to a trillion particles per day in an infected person By using live imaging researchers now know how Their research shows that within an infected cell the virus uses a combination of big viral factories and tiny mobile replication complexes to efficiently churn out copies More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C May 9 2008 Science News New theory suggests how hepatitis C may cause rare immune disease In 1990 researchers observed that most patients with hepatitis C also develop a rare autoimmune disease called mixed cryoglobulinemia a condition that frequently leads to cancer arthritis or both Now scientists at Rockefeller University say that a decade old explanation of how one disease causes the other is likely wrong and instead offer a new albeit controversial theory of their own More Tags Charles M Rice cryoglobulinemia hepatitis C Lynn Dustin April 4 2007 Science News Hepatitis C virus blocks superinfection There s infection and then there s superinfection when a cell already infected by a virus gets a second viral infection But some viruses don t like to share their cells New research from Rockefeller University shows that the hepatitis C virus which infects cells in the liver and can cause chronic liver disease can block other hepatitis C variants from infecting the same cell More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C February 26 2007 Science News Kety protein for Hepatitis C entry identified For as many as 200 million people worldwide infected with hepatitis C a leading cause of chronic liver disease treatment options are only partially effective But new research by Rockefeller University scientists points to a potential new target for better drugs a key protein that resides in human liver cells that hepatitis C requires for entry More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C March 27 2006 Science News Researchers show laboratory hepatitis C strain is also infections in animal models For many years scientists have struggled with an inability to efficiently culture the hepatitis C virus in the laboratory Now researchers at Rockefeller University have overcome several obstacles and successfully shown that a strain of HCV they created in the laboratory which can efficiently be cultured in vitro is also infectious in animals More

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/hepatitis-c/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Mohsan Saeed | Newswire
    lab In devising a method to readily grow hepatitis C in the laboratory scientists might have overcome a major hurdle for basic research into the virus and the disease it causes More Tags Charles Rice HCV hepatitis C immunology microbiology Mohsan Saeed SEC14L2 Virology Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/mohsan-saeed/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Imaging studies open a window on how effective antibodies are formed | Newswire
    had ever observed directly and described the dynamics of this process and little is known about how T cells make their determination http newswire rockefeller edu wp content uploads 2014 09 shulman BTcells mp4 Connecting A time lapse movie shows T cells red and B cells blue making contact green within a mouse germinal center Interaction between the two types of cells drives the process of diversification in which B cells are selected based on the effectiveness of the antibodies they produce Nussenzweig who is Zanvil A Cohn and Ralph M Steinman Professor along with Shulman and their colleagues developed a system in which they could observe the germinal centers directly in live mice under physiological conditions tagging T cells and B cells with separate fluorescent proteins that allowed them to track the movements of the cells in real time They also developed an algorithm that could process the resulting videos and keep precise track of the quantity of contacts between the two cell types as well as the duration of each contact They found that the amount of antigen being picked up by B cells with high affinity antibodies and presented to T cells dictates the duration of interaction between the cells In these contacts the B cells are instructed either to differentiate into antibody secreting cells or to undergo further mutation To test whether the cells were indeed communicating with one another the researchers also visualized the amount of free calcium within the cells They found an increase in intracellular calcium an indicator of signaling events triggered during the T and B cells interactions Furthermore the dynamics of the calcium signaling they observed suggests that not only are T cells telling B cells what to do but that the flow of information is bi directional T cells are

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/09/23/imaging-studies-open-a-window-on-how-effective-antibodies-are-formed/ (2016-02-13)
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  • B cells | Newswire
    system s tag and release team hunting down the invading pathogen with incredible accuracy and labeling it with antibodies that tell other immune cells to destroy it Now Rockefeller University researchers have found a way to peer inside the germinal centers where B cells learn to recognize their prey and discovered that the structures are not closed factories as most scientists previously believed but are open dynamic systems through which B cells continually pass More Tags B cells Michel C Nussenzweig September 5 2003 Science News Measuring early antibody aptituteds For the first time a group of immunologists from the laboratory of Molecular Immunology headed by Michel Nussenzweig Ph D measured the immunity aptitude of developing B cells found in the bone marrow and blood of healthy adults They discovered that between 55 75 of premature B cells are prone to bad behavior or auto reactivity More Tags B cells immunity aptitude Michel C Nussenzweig February 18 2003 Science News Backstage with a command performer Some cells sing with the chorus while others unwittingly achieve fame on their own The immune system s B cell is a true diva that spends its early days preparing for the ultimate audition Its repertoire of possible antibodies to invading microbes totals 50 million For the immune system this repertoire means the difference between destroying a potentially lethal antigen or not More Tags B cells Ezh2 Sasha Tarakhovsky May 3 2002 Science News Good Citizens in the Immune System Carry Out State s Orders The difference between good and evil matters as much in the immune system it turns out as it does to humankind The problem is understanding how the immune system s cells perceive the difference In the April 25 issue of the journal Nature a team of researchers led by Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/b-cells/ (2016-02-13)
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  • fluorescent microscopy | Newswire
    observed how two types of immune cells interact with one another during a critical period following infection in order to prepare the best antibodies and establish long lasting protection More Tags antibodies B cells fluorescent microscopy germinal center immunology Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Michel C Nussenzweig t cells Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/fluorescent-microscopy/ (2016-02-13)
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