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  • immune deficiency | Newswire
    children susceptible to two very different diseases aggravating but treatable fungal infections as well as invasive and potentially fatal bacterial disease This finding suggests a dual role for that gene RORC in human immunity to infection More Tags Candida immune deficiency Janet Markle Jean Laurent Casanova mycobacteria Satoshi Okada St Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/immune-deficiency/ (2016-02-13)
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  • mycobacteria | Newswire
    2014 Science News Single gene links susceptibility to rare infections with predisposition to autoimmune disease When scientists scanned the brains of patients who lack a particular immune protein they saw calcium deposits linked with certain diseases that occur as a result of harmful and unnecessary inflammation More Tags autoimmune disease Dusan Bogunovic interferon ISG15 Jean Laurent Casanova mycobacteria August 10 2012 Science News Protein proves vital in immune response to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/mycobacteria/ (2016-02-13)
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  • In the News – NPR – Casanova | Newswire
    way that people fight off viruses The response to influenza is genetically impaired says Jean Laurent Casanova He s hoping that the study will catch the interest of other pediatricians and lead to more patients offering their genomes for further research Tags flu influenza Jean Laurent Casanova pediatric newswire rockefeller edu Genetic mutation helps explain why in rare cases flu can kill Rockefeller ranks first among global universities in several

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/03/27/in-the-news-npr-casanova/ (2016-02-13)
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  • flu | Newswire
    get so sick with the flu The study helps explain genetic variation changes the way that people fight off viruses The response to influenza is genetically impaired says Jean Laurent Casanova He s hoping More Tags flu influenza Jean Laurent Casanova pediatric Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/flu/ (2016-02-13)
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  • influenza | Newswire
    vaccine If successful this could mean less frequent flu shots that offer broad protection against the many strains of this ever mutating virus More Tags antibodies Fc region influenza Jad Maamary Jeffrey Ravetch Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology Taia Wang universal flu vaccine March 27 2015 In the News In the News NPR Casanova A single gene may determine why some people get so sick with the flu The study helps explain genetic variation changes the way that people fight off viruses The response to influenza is genetically impaired says Jean Laurent Casanova He s hoping More Tags flu influenza Jean Laurent Casanova pediatric March 26 2015 Science News Genetic mutation helps explain why in rare cases flu can kill A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital even while their family and friends recover easily New research from Rockefeller helps explain why a rare genetic mutation that prevents the production of a critical protein interferon that is needed to fight off the virus More Tags infectious disease influenza interferon Jean Laurent Casanova St Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases Search for Categories Science News Awards

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/influenza/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Genetic mutation helps explain why, in rare cases, flu can kill | Newswire
    phenomenon for decades For instance they have discovered genetic differences that help explain why the herpes simplex virus which causes innocuous cold sores in most people can in rare cases lead to potentially fatal infections that spread to the brain Turning their attention to influenza Michael J Ciancanelli a research associate and senior member of Casanova s lab and his colleagues sequenced all genes in the genomes of the young girl who survived her dangerous bout of the flu and her parents looking for mutations that might explain her vulnerability Knowing how rare her reaction to the flu was they narrowed their search to mutations that were unique to her then focused only on those that affected the immune system What emerged from their work was the finding that the girl had inherited two differently mutated copies of the gene IRF7 which encodes a protein that amplifies the production of interferon a critical part of the body s response to viral infections No other mutations could have explained her reaction to the influenza virus says Ciancanelli Each mutation is very uncommon and thus the likelihood of carrying two damaged copies of the gene is extremely rare Indeed when they infected a sample of her blood cells that normally produce interferon plasmacytoid dendritic cells the researchers measured no interferon In contrast blood cells from her parents who each carried only one mutated version of the gene produced healthy amounts of interferon when exposed to influenza That really was definitive proof that a single non mutated copy of this gene is enough to allow people to mount a response to the virus says Ciancanelli The researchers also employed a cutting edge technology developed by their collaborators at Columbia University to reprogram the child s skin cells into early progenitor cells then differentiate

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/03/26/genetic-mutation-helps-explain-why-in-rare-cases-flu-can-kill/ (2016-02-13)
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  • interferon | Newswire
    s own machinery Researchers have found that the immune system fights a flu infection by turning off cellular enzymes the virus needs to put the final touches on new viral particles The unfinished particles cannot spread infection to new cells More Tags Charles M Rice immune response interferon Jean Laurent Casanova Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease Meike Dittmann PAI 1 Paul Bieniasz seasonal flu viral replication October 12 2014

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/interferon/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Key to blocking influenza virus may lie in a cell’s own machinery | Newswire
    1 is best known for inhibiting proteases involved in the break down of blood clots After seeing evidence of a new role for PAI 1 the researchers found that human and mouse cells unable to properly produce it appeared more vulnerable to infection by influenza A In experiments they used the subtype H1N1 a derivative of the 1918 pandemic flu and a member of a large family of flu viruses that include seasonal flu A cell infected by a virus releases chemical signals known as interferons which turn up the volume on a legion of defensive genes The hundreds of host proteins produced by these interferon stimulated genes are like an army We know that together they can effectively defend against a viral infection but we don t know how the individual soldiers fight back particularly those that interfere with later stages of viral replication when the virus exits the cell and spreads the infection says first author Meike Dittmann a postdoc in the lab Previous work here and elsewhere has explored inhibitors of the early stages of viral replication They started out by testing a large suite of genes activated by interferon With help from Paul Bieniasz s Laboratory of Retrovirology at The Rockefeller University and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center they introduced these individual genes into cells then infected the cells with the flu With the knowledge that influenza A s replication cycle takes about eight hours they watched to see which genes blocked the ability of influenza to spread As expected numerous genes inhibited late stages infection but one stood out SERPINE1 the gene that codes for PAI 1 Given what was already known about PAI 1 Dittmann suspected how it might help cells fight flu A virus attacks a cell using fusion proteins and if these don t work properly new virus particles get out of an infected cell just fine but they cannot spread the infection to other cells Proteases activate fusion proteins by clipping them but on its own influenza A doesn t have the gene for the protease it needs As a result the virus relies on the host proteases to do the job Dittmann says Subsequent experiments confirmed PAI 1 did indeed prevent the cutting of the fusion protein known as hemagglutinin and that high levels of PAI 1 prevented the virus from producing particles capable of spreading the infection Furthermore mice that lacked the gene for PAI 1 generally fared worse than their peers when infected with the influenza A virus Experiments conducted by the team s collaborators at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research in London used infected tissues cultured from mice s tracheae to confirm PAI 1 s role in fighting off the infection Human cells were the final step Researchers in Senior Attending Physician and Professor Jean Laurent Casanova s St Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics combed through a database containing genetic information on patients who had suffered from severe infectious disease to find those with

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/02/12/key-to-blocking-influenza-virus-may-lie-in-a-cells-own-machinery/ (2016-02-13)
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