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  • Charles M. Rice | Newswire
    of Virology and Infectious Disease January 28 2009 Science News Discovery could lead to a new animal model for hepatitis C The hepatitis C virus is interested in only one thing human liver cells That has been one of scientists greatest frustrations in their efforts to study the virus and has hampered the development of useful animal models for the disease But now in a major leap forward scientists have identified a protein that allows this uniquely human pathogen to enter mouse cells a finding that could lead to a vaccine or to new treatments More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C October 30 2008 Science News By imaging living cells researchers show how hepatitis C replicates The hepatitis C virus is a prolific replicator able to produce up to a trillion particles per day in an infected person By using live imaging researchers now know how Their research shows that within an infected cell the virus uses a combination of big viral factories and tiny mobile replication complexes to efficiently churn out copies More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C May 9 2008 Science News New theory suggests how hepatitis C may cause rare immune disease In 1990 researchers observed that most patients with hepatitis C also develop a rare autoimmune disease called mixed cryoglobulinemia a condition that frequently leads to cancer arthritis or both Now scientists at Rockefeller University say that a decade old explanation of how one disease causes the other is likely wrong and instead offer a new albeit controversial theory of their own More Tags Charles M Rice cryoglobulinemia hepatitis C Lynn Dustin April 4 2007 Science News Hepatitis C virus blocks superinfection There s infection and then there s superinfection when a cell already infected by a virus gets a second viral infection But some viruses don t like to share their cells New research from Rockefeller University shows that the hepatitis C virus which infects cells in the liver and can cause chronic liver disease can block other hepatitis C variants from infecting the same cell More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C February 26 2007 Science News Kety protein for Hepatitis C entry identified For as many as 200 million people worldwide infected with hepatitis C a leading cause of chronic liver disease treatment options are only partially effective But new research by Rockefeller University scientists points to a potential new target for better drugs a key protein that resides in human liver cells that hepatitis C requires for entry More Tags Charles M Rice hepatitis C March 27 2006 Science News Researchers show laboratory hepatitis C strain is also infections in animal models For many years scientists have struggled with an inability to efficiently culture the hepatitis C virus in the laboratory Now researchers at Rockefeller University have overcome several obstacles and successfully shown that a strain of HCV they created in the laboratory which can efficiently be cultured in vitro is also infectious in animals More Tags Charles M Rice

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/charles-m-rice/ (2016-02-13)
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  • immune response | Newswire
    Molecular Immunology Michel Nussenzweig June 18 2015 Science News Sequential immunizations could be the key to HIV vaccine Scientists have thought for some time that multiple immunizations each tailored to specific stages of the immune response could be used to generate a special class of HIV fighting antibodies so called broadly neutralizing antibodies These findings provide the first evidence supporting this approach More Tags antigen broadly neutralizing antibodies HIV vaccine immune response Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Lotta von Boehmer Michel Nussenzweig Pia Dosenovic February 12 2015 Science News Key to blocking influenza virus may lie in a cell s own machinery Researchers have found that the immune system fights a flu infection by turning off cellular enzymes the virus needs to put the final touches on new viral particles The unfinished particles cannot spread infection to new cells More Tags Charles M Rice immune response interferon Jean Laurent Casanova Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease Meike Dittmann PAI 1 Paul Bieniasz seasonal flu viral replication May 6 2014 Science News Discovery helps explain how B cells adapt to their targets During an infection the immune system selects B cells that produce antibodies with a high affinity for the pathogen New

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/immune-response/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Meike Dittmann | Newswire
    by turning off cellular enzymes the virus needs to put the final touches on new viral particles The unfinished particles cannot spread infection to new cells More Tags Charles M Rice immune response interferon Jean Laurent Casanova Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease Meike Dittmann PAI 1 Paul Bieniasz seasonal flu viral replication Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/meike-dittmann/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Paul Bieniasz | Newswire
    Laboratory of Retrovirology Paul Bieniasz March 2 2009 Science News Researchers unveil new monkey model for HIV For the first time scientists have succeeded in engineering a strain of HIV 1 that they can study in monkeys Just one gene different from the deadly retrovirus that works all too well in humans the new strain spreads in pig tailed macaques almost as ferociously as it does in humans Researchers at The Rockefeller University have already used it to demonstrate one method for preventing HIV 1 infection With some minor changes it could become a valuable model for vetting vaccine candidates More Tags HIV Paul Bieniasz December 12 2008 Science News Defensive protein killed ancient primate retroviruses research suggests Retroviruses work their way into the DNA of their host organisms and stay on even after they have died Their remnants leave a fossil record in the genomes of the species they infected giving scientists a chance to discover what killed them and potentially find clues for fighting retroviruses like HIV that plague us today Researchers from Rockefeller University have now revived two groups of ancient primate retroviruses and identified their killer as a defensive protein found in humans and other species More Tags Paul Bieniasz July 17 2008 Science News New evidence of battle between humans and ancient virus Human ancestors fought back against an ancient retrovirus with a defense mechanism that our bodies still use today Evidence of this battle has been preserved in our DNA for millions of years More Tags Paul Bieniasz June 2 2008 Campus News Two Rockefeller faculty become new HHMI investigators Two Rockefeller University faculty members Paul D Bieniasz and Leslie B Vosshall have been named HHMI investigators and will receive stable financial support for their research over a period of several years allowing them to conduct high risk research and follow their ideas through to fruition More Tags HHMI Leslie B Vosshall Paul Bieniasz May 25 2008 Science News Scientists image a single HIV particle being born For some the saying seeing is believing has taken on a new meaning In research to be published in the May 25 advance online issue of Nature scientists at Rockefeller University and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center have become the first to see in real time and in plain sight an HIV particle being born The images created using a technique that illuminates only the surface of the cell where the virus assembles have the potential to help researchers develop new treatments for AIDS More Tags HIV Paul Bieniasz Sanford M Simon January 18 2008 Science News Protein discovered that prevents HIV from spreading In a study that could open up a new area of virology scientists have found a molecule that keeps mutant strains of HIV from leaving their host cell This new protein tetherin causes new virus particles to stay stuck to the outer membrane and be reabsorbed by the cell More Tags HIV Paul Bieniasz tetherin December 7 2007 Science News Cells use

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/paul-bieniasz/ (2016-02-13)
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  • viral replication | Newswire
    February 12 2015 Science News Key to blocking influenza virus may lie in a cell s own machinery Researchers have found that the immune system fights a flu infection by turning off cellular enzymes the virus needs to put the final touches on new viral particles The unfinished particles cannot spread infection to new cells More Tags Charles M Rice immune response interferon Jean Laurent Casanova Laboratory of Virology and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/viral-replication/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Single gene links susceptibility to rare infections with predisposition to autoimmune disease | Newswire
    and severe TB related infections it may produce When under attack the immune system releases signaling proteins known as interferons which further activate the body s defenses In previous research Dusan Bogunovic a former postdoc in the lab now an Assistant Professor at the Department of Microbiology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai linked a lack of ISG15 to an unusual vulnerability to infections by mycobacteria a group of common bacteria that include the TB bug He and colleagues found three children one from Turkey two from Iran who became severely ill after receiving the anti tuberculosis BCG vaccine Normally ISG15 protects against infection by mycobacteria by prompting the release of type 2 interferon but all three children had two copies of a defective form of the ISG15 gene and became infected by a TB related component of the vaccine After this discovery ISG15 s story continued to unfold Bogunovic and his colleagues reported this link and then scientists in China reached out saying they had also seen loss of function mutations in three patients all from a single family But none of these three had had unexplained mycobacterial infections such as those caused by the vaccine We asked why were they patients Bogunovic recalls Our Chinese colleagues said these kids had seizures in fact one child had died from them When we looked into their BCG vaccination history we found these children who were born at home in a remote village never received their shots so they never became sick Next we looked back at our first set of patients None of them had ever had seizures but we performed brain scans that found abnormal calcium deposits in a deep part of the brain involved in controlling movement just like the deposits in brains of the Chinese children The researchers recognized the calcium deposits as a feature of a group of autoinflammatory diseases including the neurodevelopmental disorder Aicardi Goutieres syndrome These are thought to occur when type 1 interferon which normally helps fight viral infections runs amok triggering harmful and unnecessary inflammation leading to disease When Bogunovic and his colleagues then looked for evidence something similar was happening to the six patients they found unusually high expression of genes stimulated by type 1 interferon Using cells from the patients the researchers found that when they restored the ISG15 gene the cells became able to resolve the inflammation Further experiments performed in collaboration with Sandra Pellegrini at the Pasteur Institute in Paris France revealed the mechanics that linked a lack of ISG15 with an increase in type 1 interferon signaling Under normal conditions ISG15 prevents the degradation of another protein USP18 which is responsible for turning down the dial on type 1 interferon With no ISG15 and as a result little USP18 interferon becomes too active The six children all showed elevated levels of autoantibodies immune proteins that mistakenly attack the body itself suggesting that in time they will likely develop autoimmune disease However with this knowledge we

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/10/12/single-gene-links-susceptibility-to-rare-infections-with-predisposition-to-autoimmune-disease-2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • autoimmune disease | Newswire
    remission More Tags antibody therapy autoimmune disease interleukin 23 James Krueger Laboratory of Investigative Dermatology psoriasis October 12 2014 Science News Single gene links susceptibility to rare infections with predisposition to autoimmune disease When scientists scanned the brains of patients who lack a particular immune protein they saw calcium deposits linked with certain diseases that occur as a result of harmful and unnecessary inflammation More Tags autoimmune disease Dusan Bogunovic

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/autoimmune-disease/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Dusan Bogunovic | Newswire
    inflammation More Tags autoimmune disease Dusan Bogunovic interferon ISG15 Jean Laurent Casanova mycobacteria August 10 2012 Science News Protein proves vital in immune response to bacteria Research led by Rockefeller University scientists found that a protein once thought to be mainly involved in antiviral immunity is instead vital to fighting a type of bacteria that cause diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy More Tags Dusan Bogunovic ISG15 Jean Laurent Casanova

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/dusan-bogunovic/ (2016-02-13)
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