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  • Changes in population growth, consumption and farming begin to return former farmlands to nature | Newswire
    Back to nature An analysis of global land use and population growth has led Rockefeller scientists to conclude that use of land for farming has reached a peak with former farmlands returning to nature Above land that was farmed and grazed in Chile is now returning to forest Photo courtesy of Jesse H Ausubel Ausubel with co authors Paul Waggoner and Iddo K Wernick analyzed factors such as global land use and population growth over the last 50 years Looking at the production index of all crops of the UN s Food and Agriculture Organization they found that from 1961 to 2009 land farmed grew by only 12 percent while the index rose about 300 percent Without lifting crop production per hectare farmers would have needed about 3 billion more hectares about the sum of the United States Canada and China or almost twice South America says Ausubel The expanded cropland would have come at the expense of other covers especially forest and grassland Using China as an example Ausubel and his colleagues show that in 2010 China s maize farmers spared 120 million hectares from the land that would have been required with the yields of 1961 twice the area of France Overall the researchers found producing an equivalent aggregate of crop production in 2009 required only about 35 percent of the land needed in 1961 In addition to improved yields achieved by farmers the researchers credit additional factors leading to peak farmland parents giving birth to fewer children and consumers raising their calorie consumption more slowly than their affluence and moderating their meat eating Our analyses over the past 20 years witness food decoupling from land says Ausubel For millennia food production tended to grow in tandem with land used for crops a fundamental relationship in population and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/12/21/changes-in-population-growth-consumption-and-farming-begin-to-return-former-farmlands-to-nature/ (2016-02-13)
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  • population | Newswire
    use population projections to estimate local needs for things like jobs schools housing and health care but coming up with those projections has been an inexact science A newly developed more precise formula to describe how people move between countries could lead to better use of resources and improved economic conditions More Tags Joel E Cohen migration population December 11 2006 Science News New means of predicting populations more accurately accounts for random influences By studying the ways of little jar bound cannibals tiny flour beetles who like to eat their young scientists at Rockefeller University have created techniques they believe are the best yet to capture how random noise affects the dynamics of a biological population More Tags Joel E Cohen population April 19 2006 Science News Genetic data from an island population proves to be useful tool in understanding disease With fewer than 4 000 residents the genetically isolated Micronesian island of Kosrae in the West Pacific provides an ideal population in which to research heritability of disease Now this data is beginning to yield intriguing results about the genetic basis of complex disease More Tags Jeffrey M Friedman population November 14 2003 Science News By the year 2050 human population could add 2 6 billion people reports Rockefeller scientist Joel E Cohen It took from the beginning of time until 1950 to put the first 2 5 billion people on the planet Yet in the next half century an increase that exceeds the total population of the world in 1950 will occur So writes Joel E Cohen Ph D Dr P H professor and head of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University and Columbia University in a Viewpoint article in the November 14 issue of the journal Science More Tags Joel E Cohen population February

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/population/ (2016-02-13)
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  • The Great Reversal, an increase in forest density worldwide, is under way | Newswire
    emissions Tempering the fifth by slowing or reversing the loss of carbon in forests would be a worthwhile mitigation The great role of density means that not only conservation of forest area but also managing denser healthier forests can mitigate carbon emission says Rautiainen Co author Paul E Waggoner a forestry expert with Connecticut s Agricultural Experiment Station says remote sensing by satellites of the world s forest area brings access to remote places and a uniform method However to speak of carbon we must look beyond measurements of area and apply forestry methods traditionally used to measure timber volumes Forests are like cities they can grow both by spreading and by becoming denser says co author Iddo Wernick of The Rockefeller University s Program for the Human Environment The authors say most regions and almost all temperate nations have stopped losing forest and the study s findings constitute a new signal of what co author Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller calls the Great Reversal under way in global forests after centuries of loss and decline Opportunities to absorb carbon and restore the world s forests can come through increasing density or area or both To examine how changing forest area and density affect timber volume and carbon the study team first focused on the United States where the U S Forest Service has conducted a continuing inventory of forest area timberland area and growing stock since 1953 They found that while U S timberland area grew only 1 percent between 1953 and 2007 the combined national volume of growing stock increased by an impressive 51 percent National forest density increased substantially For an international perspective the research team examined the 2010 Global Forest Resources Assessment compiled by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization FAO which provides consistent figures for the

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/06/06/the-great-reversal-an-increase-in-forest-density-worldwide-is-under-way/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Program for the Human Environment | Newswire
    and Finland challenges measurements of carbon storage based on forest area alone Several national increases of density and or area signal the Great Reversal is under way in forests globally after centuries of loss and decline More Tags Jesse Ausubel Program for the Human Environment April 19 2011 Awards and Honors Jesse Ausubel elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences Ausubel a researcher who studies environmental science and technology and industrial evolution is honored with election to the prestigious independent policy research academy More Tags American Academy of Arts and Sciences Dinochelus ausubeli Jesse Ausubel Program for the Human Environment December 28 2009 Science News DNA barcoding reveals 95 species of life in NYC homes students show Armed with the latest high tech DNA analysis techniques two New York City high school students examined every nook and cranny of their homes and were astonished to discover a veritable zoo of 95 animal species surrounding them in everything from fridges to furniture More Tags DNA barcoding Program for the Human Environment August 19 2008 Science News Intensity of human environmental impact may lessen as incomes rise analysis suggests The richer you are the more of the world s resources you can afford to consume But in many parts of the world rising incomes are not having the proportionate effect on energy consumption croplands and deforestation that one might expect a new 25 year study shows More Tags Jesse Ausubel Program for the Human Environment February 22 2007 Science News DNA barcoding uncovers likely new species of birds and bats In the first effort to ever barcode species on a continental scale scientists have completed a pilot study of U S and Canadian birds that suggests that 15 new genetically distant species have been overlooked in centuries of bird studies The

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/program-for-the-human-environment/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jesse Ausubel elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences | Newswire
    of harmful materials such as cadmium His work in industrial ecology has resulted in analyses of the effects of technology on human population growth death mobility and materials and has proposed innovative solutions to global problems including deforestation carbon emissions and energy distribution More recently he has participated in the development of international programs to assess and explain the diversity distribution and abundance of life in the oceans the Census of Marine Life and on land through the creation of the Encyclopedia of Life a Web site that will catalog all of Earth s 1 8 million known and named species Ausubel who joined Rockefeller in 1989 is also vice president at the Sloan Foundation where he manages grant making programs in the basic sciences Before coming to Rockefeller he worked at the U S National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering where he contributed to several important research projects on climate change including the first comprehensive NAS review of the greenhouse effect published in 1983 A graduate of Harvard and Columbia universities he is an adjunct scientist of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution a University Fellow of Resources for the Future a trustee of the Richard Lounsbery Foundation and the recipient of a 2009 Dalhousie University honorary doctorate and the 2010 Blue Frontier Peter Benchley prize for ocean science He has also had a new species of lobster Dinochelus ausubeli named for him Founded in 1780 by John Adams James Bowdoin John Hancock and other scholar patriots the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has members from diverse industries and disciplines who have made significant contributions in their fields or to society at large Current research interests at the academy include science and global security the humanities and culture social policy and education Previous generations of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/04/19/jesse-ausubel-elected-to-american-academy-of-arts-and-sciences/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Dinochelus ausubeli | Newswire
    Dinochelus ausubeli Jesse Ausubel Program for the Human Environment February 1 2011 Science News Newly discovered deep sea lobster named for Rockefeller s Jesse Ausubel A newly discovered deep sea lobster is one of many species identified for the first time through the Census of Marine Life a decade long project that sponsored 540 expeditions carried out by 2700 researchers from more than 80 countries More Tags Dinochelus ausubeli Jesse

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/dinochelus-ausubeli/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Newly discovered deep sea lobster named for Rockefeller’s Jesse Ausubel | Newswire
    trio of scientists the lobster Dinochelus ausubeli lives in the deep ocean water near the Phillipines The lobster has movable well developed eyestalks and an inverted T plate in front of its mouth But its most striking feature is a mighty claw with a short bulbous palm and extremely long spiny fingers for capturing prey Dinochelus is derived from the Greek words dino meaning terrible and fearful and chelus meaning claw All told the Census of Marine Life sponsored 540 expeditions over 10 years carried out by 2700 researchers from more than 80 countries It was Ausubel says the biggest project in the history of marine biology Like editors of 18th century encyclopedias and almanacs and dictionaries the Census of Marine Life has made much more accessible a lot of preexisting but poorly organized information says Ausubel who is the director of the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller It has also led to the discovery of many new things In addition to the discovery of Dinochelus ausubeli notable contributions from scientists involved in the Census include a diagram correlating the genetic relatedness of 5000 marine species from 10 phyla a map of highways and neighborhoods of about 20 species of top predators in the Pacific revealed from birds fish whales and other animals carrying small tags and unprecedented estimates of deep ocean marine biomass drawing on about 200 studies carried out under the Census that show surprising abundance of seafloor biomass at high latitudes The Census also exposed many gaps in our knowledge of what is known and unknown For example the Arctic Ocean remains strikingly unobserved The Russians may plant a flag but neither they nor anyone else knows what lives near the North Pole says Ausubel Findings from the project are linked to the Barcode of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/02/01/newly-discovered-deep-sea-lobster-named-for-rockefeller%e2%80%99s-jesse-ausubel/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Intensity of human environmental impact may lessen as incomes rise, analysis suggests | Newswire
    toward rising environmental quality The results are published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences For generations people have lightened their environmental impact by multiplying their consumption less than their income says Ausubel director of the Program for the Human Environment We have found encouraging evidence that this trend continues particularly in places like China and India While consumers increase their use of staples more slowly than their affluence grows producers also play a role as access to better technology allows them to get more from less An especially striking example is China Without the dematerialization from 1980 to 2006 by Chinese consumers actual national energy use in 2006 would have been 180 percent greater Ausubel says In India an initial trend toward poorer environmental performance appears to have reversed Meanwhile the effect has also occurred in the United States France and other rich nations In the U S dematerialization progressed steadily at about two percent a year throughout the study period regardless of which political party was in power Other countries however have not shown progress Though positive evidence prevails our analysis reports troubling directions for Brazil and especially Indonesia Ausubel says And in several instances

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2008/08/19/intensity-of-human-environmental-impact-may-lessen-as-incomes-rise-analysis-suggests/ (2016-02-13)
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