archive-edu.com » EDU » R » ROCKEFELLER.EDU

Total: 1631

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • facial movement | Newswire
    small tareas within their brains that respond to images of faces New research shows these so called face patches also respond selectively to changing expressions and other facial motion More Tags Clark Fisher face patches face processing facial movement Laboratory of Neural Systems motion processing social cues Winrich Freiwald Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/facial-movement/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Winrich Freiwald named Pew Scholar | Newswire
    in public policy solutions public information initiatives and civic life Applicants are nominated by one of the 155 invited institutions and demonstrate excellence and innovation in their research Freiwald head of the Laboratory of Neural Systems is interested in the neural processes that form object representations in the brain as well as those that allow attention to make those representations available for cognition He earned his doctorate at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt Germany and was a research assistant at the Institute for Brain Research at the University of Bremen Starting in 2001 he worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Medical School He joined The Rockefeller University as assistant professor in 2009 He is currently expanding his research by probing the central nervous system to understand how specific cells respond to faces and then relay and integrate their messages to produce social recognition His research addresses questions and mechanisms that are relevant to interpersonal interactions as well as disorders that interfere with basic neural processing skills such as autism Freiwald is one of 21 Pew Scholars named this year Previous Rockefeller awardees include Seth A Darst Nathaniel Heintz Tarun

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/06/18/winrich-freiwald-named-pew-scholar/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Visual neuroscientist named to Rockefeller’s faculty | Newswire
    By using functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI to detect activity changes in the brains of macaque monkeys as well as electrophysiological techniques Freiwald has identified several regions called patches in the brain s temporal lobes that are active during the processing of specific categories of objects In particular Freiwald is interested in the process by which the monkeys recognize faces which is important for social reasons His experiments have shown that neurons in one specific face patch respond whenever a monkey sees a face while neurons in a second face patch respond only when it sees a certain face and neurons in a third face patch respond only when it sees a face in a certain orientation Furthermore Freiwald s research suggests that these face patches are tightly connected to each other and form an entire face processing network with each patch devoted to a unique component of face processing I think the face processing system is just amazing and presents us with a unique opportunity to study brain function You can see it as a little biological machine that s better at face recognition than any technical system to date and you can ask why it is so good You can see it as a model system for understanding object recognition in general You can use it as a model system to understand how different brain regions interact And you can see it as an important building block of the social brain says Freiwald Freiwald is particularly interested in understanding how attention and other cognitive and emotional capacities modify visual processing Our work doesn t stop with the visual aspects of faces says Freiwald Just a few synapses down the road you have areas that are critical to emotional social and mnemonic aspects of brain function Results in one

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/02/11/visual-neuroscientist-named-to-rockefellers-faculty/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Elaine Fuchs | Newswire | Page 2
    Tags ACF7 cell migration Elaine Fuchs March 2 2008 Science News microRNA 203 helps build skin s protective barrier It s a rough world and exposed skin cells weather conditions harsh enough to mutate DNA To keep these mutations from spreading evolution has found a way to keep these cells from proliferating In a series of elegant experiments Rockefeller University researchers have now discovered evolution s solution a tiny strand of RNA But the research s implications go deeper and may also suggest how healthy cells elsewhere in the body can turn cancerous More Tags Elaine Fuchs MicroRNAs February 14 2008 Science News BMP protein maintains crosstalk between cells that control hair growth Every cell has the same set of genes it s the combination of genes that are turned on or off that makes each type unique Now researchers at Rockefeller University have identified a signaling molecule that is critical for a type of skin cell called dermal papilla to ratchet up or clamp down the activity of genes that give them their molecular identity Without these signals these skin cells lose their hair inducing properties findings that may provide a new understanding of how stem cells differentiate More Tags BMP Elaine Fuchs January 24 2008 Science News Protein that controls hair growth also keeps stem cells slumbering By combining clinical and scientific research scientists at Rockefeller University reveal that a protein involved in hair growth also keeps the skin s stem cells from proliferating This research raises questions about what stem cells need in order to maintain their ability to regenerate tissues questions that may be key in developing treatments for patients with thinning hair More Tags Elaine Fuchs stem cells October 22 2007 Science News Balancing act protects vulnerable cells from cancer Tumor suppressing pathways usually suppress tumors That s a good thing Even better When a vital component of the pathway is removed it continues to suppress tumors Research led by Elaine Fuchs at Rockefeller University reveals that when epithelial cells lack a receptor called TβRII the cells hyperproliferate a potentially lethal process balanced by elevated levels of cell death This balancing act occurs in all cells that express a major structural protein called keratin 14 but while some tissues remain healthy for life others spontaneously develop a highly disfiguring and invasive form of skin cancer one of the very few cancers on the rise More Tags Elaine Fuchs tumors August 2 2007 Science News Initial trigger is not enough to determine a cell s fate Research uncovering how a signaling pathway regulates stem cell behavior reveals that adult stem cells continue to respond to their environment even after they are activated and can switch their developmental agenda putting a whole new spin on our understanding of stem cells More Tags BMP Elaine Fuchs February 12 2007 Science News Scientists clone mice from adult skin stem cells The potential of stem cells has so far gone largely untapped despite the great promise that stem cells hold

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/elaine-fuchs/page/2/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Scientists pinpoint molecule that controls stem cell plasticity by boosting gene expression | Newswire
    and hair follicle stem cells cannot survive Sox9 is a type of protein called a transcription factor which can act like a volume dial for genes When a transcription factor binds to a segment of DNA known as an enhancer it cranks up the activity of the associated gene Recently scientists identified a less common but more powerful version the super enhancer Super enhancers are much longer pieces of DNA and host large numbers of cell type specific transcription factors that bind cooperatively Super enhancers also contain histones DNA packaging proteins that harbor specific chemical groups epigenetic marks that make genes they are associated with accessible so they can be expressed Using an epigenetic mark associated specifically with the histones of enhancers first author Rene Adam a graduate student in the lab and colleagues identified 377 of these high powered gene amplifying regions in hair follicle stem cells The majority of these super enhancers were bound by at least five transcription factors often including Sox9 Then they compared the stem cell super enhancers to those of short lived stem cell progeny which have begun to choose a fate and so lost the plasticity of stem cells These two types of cells shared only 32 percent of their super enhancers suggesting these regions played an important role in skin cell identity By switching off super enhancers associated with stem cell genes these genes were silenced while new super enhancers were being activated to turn on hair genes To better understand these dynamics the researchers took a piece of a super enhancer called an epicenter where all the stem cell transcription factors bind and they linked it to a gene that glowed green whenever the transcription factors were present In living mice all the hair follicle stem cells glowed green but surprisingly the green gene turned off when the stem cells were taken from the follicle and placed in culture When they put the cells back into living skin the green glow returned Another clue came from experiments performed by Hanseul Yang another student in the lab By examining the new super enhancers that were gained when the stem cells were cultured they learned that these new super enhancers bound transcription factors that were known to be activated during wound repair When they used one of these epicenters to drive the green gene the green glow appeared in culture but not in skin When they wounded the skin then the green glow switched on We were learning that some super enhancers are specifically activated in the stem cells within their native niche while other super enhancers specifically switch on during injury explained Adam By shifting epicenters you can shift from one cohort of transcription factors to another to adapt to different environments But we still needed to determine what was controlling these shifts The culprit turned out to be Sox9 the only transcription factor expressed in both living tissue and culture Further experiments confirmed Sox9 s importance by showing for example that

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/03/19/scientists-pinpoint-molecule-that-controls-stem-cell-plasticity-by-boosting-gene-expression/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • hair follicle stem cells | Newswire
    The molecule first makes stem cell genes accessible so they can become active then recruits other molecules that promote the expression of these genes in stem cells found at the base of the hair follicle More Tags Elaine Fuchs hair follicle stem cells Hanseul Yang Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development Rene Adam Sox9 stem cell plasticity super enhancers transcription factors Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/hair-follicle-stem-cells/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hanseul Yang | Newswire
    molecule first makes stem cell genes accessible so they can become active then recruits other molecules that promote the expression of these genes in stem cells found at the base of the hair follicle More Tags Elaine Fuchs hair follicle stem cells Hanseul Yang Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development Rene Adam Sox9 stem cell plasticity super enhancers transcription factors Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/hanseul-yang/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sox9 | Newswire
    molecule first makes stem cell genes accessible so they can become active then recruits other molecules that promote the expression of these genes in stem cells found at the base of the hair follicle More Tags Elaine Fuchs hair follicle stem cells Hanseul Yang Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development Rene Adam Sox9 stem cell plasticity super enhancers transcription factors Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/sox9/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive