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  • Ya-Chieh Hsu | Newswire
    the immune system selects B cells that produce antibodies with a high affinity for the pathogen New research helps explain the details of how these cells are selected and amplified More Tags Elaine Fuchs sonic hedgehog stem cells transit amplifying cells Ya Chieh Hsu Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/ya-chieh-hsu/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Elaine Fuchs receives prestigious award from American Association for Cancer Research | Newswire
    the biological basis of normal and abnormal skin development and function Among her important research discoveries was the clarification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of skin stem cells to produce the epidermis and its appendages including hair follicles and sweat and oil glands She has also defined how the normal biology of skin stem cells can be deregulated in skin cancers and other hyperproliferative disorders of the skin Her work has implications for skin related diseases particularly cancers genetic diseases and proinflammatory disorders Dr Fuchs is an exceptional scientist and we are delighted to recognize her pioneering research on the biology of skin stem cells and how they go awry in human diseases of the skin including cancer says Margaret Foti chief executive officer of the AACR Her studies have had a profound impact not only on the field of cancer research but also on the research disciplines of genetics and dermatology The Pezcoller Foundation AACR International Award now in its 17th year recognizes an individual scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic or translational cancer research Fuchs received her bachelor s degree in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and her doctorate at Princeton University Princeton N J and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston Fuchs was the Amgen professor of basic sciences at the University of Chicago before joining Rockefeller University in 2002 Fuchs was named one of the inaugural Fellows of the AACR Academy last year She has received many additional honors throughout her career including the AACR Women in Cancer Research Charlotte Friend Memorial Lectureship the National Medal of Science the Albany Prize in medicine the Kilgman Frost Leadership Award from the Society of Investigative Dermatology L Oreal Unesco Award

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/03/03/elaine-fuchs-receives-prestigious-award-from-american-association-for-cancer-research/ (2016-02-13)
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  • American Association for Cancer Research | Newswire
    award now in its 17th year recognizes an individual scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic or translational cancer research More Tags American Association for Cancer Research Elaine Fuchs Pezcoller April 21 2010 Awards and Honors Titia de Lange receives AACR Clowes Award Titia de Lange is the 50th annual recipient of the American Association of Cancer Research s award to an individual with

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/american-association-for-cancer-research/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Pezcoller | Newswire
    cells and skin related disease Fuchs is highly regarded for her studies using reverse genetics to understand the biological basis of normal and abnormal skin development and function The award now in its 17th year recognizes an individual scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic or translational cancer research More Tags American Association for Cancer Research Elaine Fuchs Pezcoller Search for Categories Science News

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/pezcoller/ (2016-02-13)
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  • New RNA interference technique finds seven genes for head and neck cancer | Newswire
    in the lab which is headed by Rebecca C Lancefield Professor Elaine Fuchs It can take about two years per gene Our method can assess about 300 genes in a single mouse in as little as five weeks The researchers made use of RNA interference a natural process whereby RNA molecules inhibit gene expression They took short pieces of RNA which are able to turn off the function of specific genes attached them to highly concentrated viruses and then using ultrasound to guide the needle without damaging surrounding tissue they injected the viruses into the sacs of mouse embryos The virus is absorbed and integrated into the chromosomes of the single layer of surface cells that cover the tiny embryo explains Fuchs As the embryo develops this layer of cells becomes the skin mammary glands and oral tissue enabling us to efficiently selectively and quickly eliminate the expression of any desired gene in these tissues The non invasive method avoids triggering a wound or inflammatory response that is typically associated with conventional methods to knockdown a gene in cultured cells and then engraft the cells onto a mouse When the mice grew the researchers determined which genes when turned off were promoting tumor growth and what they found was surprising Among the seven novel tumor suppressor genes we found our strongest hit was Myh9 which codes for the protein myosin IIa a motor protein with well known function in cell structure and cell migration says Schramek Through further functional studies we found that myosin IIa is also required for activation of the main guardian of the genome a tumor suppressor protein called p53 The lab showed that when the myosin IIa gene was mutated p53 was not able to build up in the cell nucleus and chaos ensued genes responsible

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/01/23/new-rna-interference-technique-finds-seven-genes-for-head-and-neck-cancer/ (2016-02-13)
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  • head and neck cancer | Newswire
    RNA to highly concentrated viruses and uses ultrasound to inject the viruses into mouse embryos It takes a fraction of the resources and much less time than using knockout mice to conduct genetic screens and can assess about 300 genes in a single mouse in as little as five weeks More Tags cancer Elaine Fuchs head and neck cancer myosin IIa RNA interference Search for Categories Science News Awards and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/head-and-neck-cancer/ (2016-02-13)
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  • myosin IIa | Newswire
    to highly concentrated viruses and uses ultrasound to inject the viruses into mouse embryos It takes a fraction of the resources and much less time than using knockout mice to conduct genetic screens and can assess about 300 genes in a single mouse in as little as five weeks More Tags cancer Elaine Fuchs head and neck cancer myosin IIa RNA interference Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/myosin-iia/ (2016-02-13)
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  • New technique in RNA interference cuts time and cost in genetic screens | Newswire
    are exposed to stress and nonphysiological growth conditions Doing the screen involves using short pieces of RNA called small hairpin RNAs which are inserted into the cell and are able to halt messages from specific genes keeping the genes from making proteins A genetic screen might look at 15 000 genes meaning thousands of petri dishes or fruit flies a task deemed far too large time consuming and costly to do with current mouse knockout technology But researchers led by Slobodan Beronja a former postdoc in Fuchs s Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development created a special method of RNA interference where the small hairpin RNAs are all pooled together and injected into the embryos of pregnant mice using a virus We ve now devised a technology where we can effectively treat the surface of living mouse embryos as a petri dish of cells and carry out genome wide screens on mouse cells in their native environment in vivo says Fuchs Previously genome wide screens were only possible in lower animals such as flies worms and yeast where it is often difficult to assess the relevance to human disorders such as cancer After allowing for normal or pre cancerous tissues to grow the researchers quantified the number of individual small hairpin RNAs in the animals and used it as a measure of their relative importance to the growth process Beronja now an assistant member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center explains The result is the ability to screen more genes with fewer mice The team screened over 16 000 genes using just 100 litters of mice and identified about 200 genes that were uniquely important to oncogenic growth in the skin We wanted to identify new genes that are worthy of creating drugs against in cancer treatment says

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/08/14/new-technique-in-rna-interference-cuts-time-and-cost-in-genetic-screens/ (2016-02-13)
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