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  • epidermis | Newswire
    revealed the first genome wide RNA interference screen of a mouse using a new technique that essentially treats the surface of living mouse embryos as a petri dish of cells allowing for in vivo analysis More Tags Elaine Fuchs epidermis mllt6 RNA interference Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/epidermis/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Researchers find molecule that causes sunburn pain | Newswire
    its role in the epidermis with Dr Fuchs only recently Together with colleagues Dr Liedtke and his team first built a mouse model that was missing TRPV4 only in the cells of the epidermis the outermost layer of the skin After exposing their hind paws which most resemble human skin to UVB rays the researchers found that the mutant mice showed little sensitization and tissue injury compared with normal mice Next they used cultured mouse skin cells to dissect the activities of TRPV4 which is an ion channel in the cell membrane Using a device engineered by Nan Marie Jokerst a professor at Duke s Pratt School of Engineering the researchers uncovered the sequence of events in this pain pathway UVB exposure activates TRPV4 which causes the influx of calcium ions into the skin cells which brings in another molecule called endothelin which triggers TRPV4 to send more calcium into the cells Endothelin is known to cause pain in humans and also evokes itching which could explain the urge to scratch sunburned skin To see if they could block the pain pathway the scientists used a pharmaceutical compound called GSK205 that selectively inhibits TRPV4 When applied to the hind paws of normal mice the mice were resistant to the pain inducing and skin disrupting effects of sunburn In mouse skin cells in culture the compound stopped the UV triggered influx of calcium ions into the cells By blocking TRPV4 channels our epidermis can no longer communicate with the sensory neurons in the skin says Fuchs Although this may not protect fully against the damage it eases the pain Our understanding of how mammals respond to harmful UVB rays is altered both at the molecular as well as the cellular level says Dr Liedtke associate professor of neurology and attending physician

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/08/08/researchers-find-molecule-that-causes-sunburn-pain/ (2016-02-13)
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  • skin | Newswire
    by new ones that push their way up to the surface In new research that further dissects how stem cells specialize into tissue cells scientists now show how these new skin cells arise work that may one day hold promise for burn victims More Tags regeneration skin stem cells September 2 2004 Science News Single isolated mouse skin cell can generate into variety of epidermal tissues Researchers at the Howard

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/skin/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Scientists identify gene that regulates stem cell death and skin regeneration | Newswire
    a gene called Sept4 ARTS Earlier research from the Steller lab showed that mice genetically modified to lack Sept4 ARTS have more blood stem cells with enhanced resistance to apoptosis the cell death program that organisms use to pare down unneeded cells The ARTS protein was originally discovered by Sarit Larisch a scientist at Haifa University who is also a visiting professor in the Steller laboratory The normal function of this protein is to interfere with molecules called inhibitor of apoptosis proteins IAPs which prevent cells from killing themselves By inhibiting these inhibitors under the right circumstances ARTS helps to take the brakes off the process of apoptosis permitting the cell to die on schedule One question that remained from the earlier study was whether stem cells resistant to apoptosis could be beneficial for the wound healing process In the new research Yaron Fuchs and his colleagues in the Strang Laboratory and in the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development headed by co senior author Elaine Fuchs decided to use skin as a model to answer this question During the growing stage of the hair follicle stem cells are activated briefly to make a pool of transient intermediates which divide rapidly and then progress to differentiate into hair cells explains Elaine Fuchs who is Rebecca C Lancefield Professor at Rockefeller and an HHMI investigator The intermediates are short lived and when the destructive phase ensues and hair growth grinds to a halt they die by apoptosis By contrast many but not all of the stem cells are spared S ept4 ARTS levels determine whether stem cells will live or die during this period The researchers again using Sept4 ARTS deficient mice found that wound repair in these mice was faster and of higher quality than in their unmodified counterparts

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/06/20/scientists-identify-gene-that-regulates-stem-cell-death-and-skin-regeneration/ (2016-02-13)
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  • ARTS | Newswire
    wound healing regeneration and cancer More Tags ARTS Elaine Fuchs Hermann Steller skin stem cells October 14 2010 Science News Gene identified that prevents stem cells from turning cancerous Stem cells have tremendous regenerative power but their potency can also be lethal Now researchers have identified a gene that prevents stem cells from turning into tumors in mice by regulating the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis The work

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/arts/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Hermann Steller | Newswire
    apoptosis is crucial in early development and in the routine maintenance of life New research conducted in the cells of fruit fly eyes delves into the molecular complexity of the process and returns fresh insights about the proteins that initiate cell death The results suggest a technique that could allow for highly efficient targeted killing of problematic cells such as those that drive the uncontrolled growth of tumors More Tags Cristinel Sandu Hermann Steller Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology October 14 2010 Science News Gene identified that prevents stem cells from turning cancerous Stem cells have tremendous regenerative power but their potency can also be lethal Now researchers have identified a gene that prevents stem cells from turning into tumors in mice by regulating the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis The work is the first to show that interfering with the programmed death of stem cells can have fatal consequences More Tags ARTS Hermann Steller Maria Garcia Fernandez stem cells Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology April 27 2009 Science News Levels of cellular stress determines longevity of retinal cells Scientists expose neurons in the fruit fly retina and other cells to moderate cellular stress and find a protective effect shedding light on potential therapeutic targets that can protect against or delay the onset of neurodegeneration More Tags Hermann Steller retinal cells August 15 2008 Science News By amplifying cell death signals scientists make precancerous cells self destruct On the cellular level death signals can actually be life saving by killing off abnormally dividing cells before they turn cancerous Now Rockefeller University researchers have found a way to amplify these signals by turning a life affirming protein into a killer The findings not only mark a breakthrough in the field but also open the door to a new line of drugs for cancer therapeutics More Tags Hermann Steller IAP RING September 17 2007 Science News New cell death pathway involved in sperm development Good swimmers like healthy sperm are sleek and light They shed extra pounds shape their body and even shave their legs to move efficiently and fast Sperm also remove excess baggage to function optimally and caspases proteins involved in apoptosis or programmed cell death facilitate this process New research from Rockefeller University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute uncovers a new pathway that regulates caspase activity in Drosophila sperm a finding that represents a new and promising drug target for therapeutic purposes More Tags Drosophila melanogaster Hermann Steller programmed cell death December 22 2006 Science News Unfolded proteins may protect cells from dying When proteins are not properly folded cells become stressed to a point where they may die But new research shows that a stress response pathway helps them cope with inhospitable environments and it could lead to new therapies to fight disease More Tags ADRP Hermann Steller unfolded protein January 31 2006 Science News For insect cells like mouse cells one protein decides between life and death Cells are given

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/hermann-steller/ (2016-02-13)
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  • skin stem cells | Newswire
    of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development has revealed a new function for a gene previously shown to prevent stem cells from turning cancerous The gene Sept4 ARTS has now been shown to regulate programmed death in skin stem cells a finding that may have implications for wound healing regeneration and cancer More Tags ARTS Elaine Fuchs Hermann Steller skin stem cells Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/skin-stem-cells/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Elaine Fuchs to receive Pasarow Award | Newswire
    000 to support ongoing research This is the 25th and final year that the Pasarow Awards will be presented the scientists will receive the prize May 10 at the University of Southern California Fuchs s lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of skin stem cells how they make and repair tissues and how cancers develop Her group focuses on the mechanisms that impart skin stem cells with the ability to self renew develop and maintain tissues and how these cells respond to external cues and depart from their niche to accomplish these tasks Fuchs uncovered the genetic basis of blistering skin diseases and deciphered the characteristics of skin stem cells that allow them to develop into distinct tissues and organs She also pioneered the use of reverse genetics which studies protein functions and then determines what diseases occur when the proteins malfunction Fuchs received her B S in chemistry from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in 1972 and her Ph D in biochemistry in 1977 from Princeton University She was a postdoc at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1977 to 1980 Fuchs was the Amgen Professor of Basic Sciences at the University of Chicago before coming to Rockefeller in 2002 She was named the Rebecca C Lancefield Professor the same year She has been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator since 1988 She is the recipient of a number of honors including the 2012 Medal from the New York Academy of Medicine 2012 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology 2011 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research 2011 Passano Prize 2011 Madison Medal 2010 L Oréal UNESCO Award in the Life Sciences 2010 Charlotte Friend Award from the American Association for Cancer Research and the 2009 National Medal of Science Previous Rockefeller recipients of Pasarow awards

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2013/03/18/elaine-fuchs-to-receive-pasarow-award/ (2016-02-13)
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