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  • Elaine Fuchs to receive Passano Award | Newswire
    of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development is also is an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute She is being recognized for her contributions to our knowledge of skin biology and skin stem cells Her work has provided insights into our understanding of how stem cells of all types are able to rejuvenate tissues throughout life and also repair them after injury Fuchs received her B S in chemistry from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in 1972 and her Ph D in biochemistry in 1977 from Princeton University She was a Damon Runyon postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1977 to 1980 Fuchs was the Amgen Professor of Basic Sciences at The University of Chicago before coming to Rockefeller in 2002 She has been an HHMI investigator since 1988 Fuchs has received a number of honors and awards including the 2010 L Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Prize the 2010 James Madison Medal from Princeton University the 2008 National Medal of Science the Bering Award and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Award for Scientific Excellence in 2006 the Dickson Prize in Medicine in 2004 the Novartis Drew Award in Biomedical Research in 2003 the Cartwright Award from Columbia University in 2002 and the Women in Cell Biology Senior Women s Career Achievement Award in 1997 In 1994 Fuchs was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences NAS and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences The Passano Foundation founded in 1945 is devoted to encouraging medical science and research particularly activities that have broad impact and clinical application More than 20 of the Passano award winners have gone on to win a Nobel Prize Previous Passano Award winners currently at Rockefeller include Jeffrey M Friedman

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/03/11/elaine-fuchs-to-receive-passano-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Passano Award | Newswire
    Awards and Honors Jeffrey Friedman discoverer of leptin receives Gairdner Passano awards Rockefeller University s Jeffrey M Friedman M D Ph D a molecular geneticist whose discovery of the hormone leptin and its role in regulating body weight has changed our understanding of the causes of human obesity has received two prestigious awards for this work the Gairdner Foundation International Award and the Passano Foundation Award More Tags Gairdner Award

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/passano-award/ (2016-02-13)
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  • stem cells | Newswire | Page 2
    the beginning of human embryonic development and serving as a starting point from which to understand their potential therapeutic secrets of human embryonic stem cells More Tags Ali H Brivanlou REUS1 stem cells May 23 2005 Grants and Gifts The Starr Foundation funds tri institution stem cell research Three New York City biomedical research institutions The Rockefeller University Weill Medical College of Cornell University and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center MSKCC will receive 50 million over three years from The Starr Foundation to develop new resources and expertise in stem cell research More Tags Starr Foundation stem cells September 2 2004 Science News Single isolated mouse skin cell can generate into variety of epidermal tissues Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University have isolated stem cells from the skin of a mouse and showed for the first time that an individual stem cell can renew itself in the laboratory and then be used in grafts to produce skin hair and oil glands More Tags Elaine Fuchs skin stem cells August 3 2004 Campus News Rockefeller University establishes stem cell research center With the support of a 5 million endowment donated by New York City philanthropist Harriet Heilbrunn The Rockefeller University has established the Robert and Harriet Heilbrunn Center for Stem Cell Research More Tags Harriet Heilbrunn stem cells January 5 2004 Science News Feeder free system for maintaining embryonic stem cells pioneered at Rockefeller University Rockefeller University researchers in collaboration with two European scientists have devised a system for maintaining human embryonic stem cell lines that excludes the need for troublesome mouse feeder cells More Tags Ali H Brivanlou BIO HESC stem cells December 11 2003 Science News New method identifying and isolating stem cells developed Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/stem-cells/page/2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Odd histone helps suppress jumping genes in stem cells, study says | Newswire
    left behind by ancient viral infections from moving about within the genome says study author C David Allis Joy and Jack Fishman Professor and head of the Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics This discovery is an important addition to our still evolving knowledge of how epigenetics works at the molecular level Histones are proteins that act as spools for the thread that is DNA giving it support and structure Chemical modifications to these histones can change the expression of genes making them more available for expression or silencing them by compacting the DNA protein complex Oddball H3 3 varies from its regular counterpart H3 by only few amino acids Because it is present throughout the animal kingdom however scientists have suspected for some time that H3 3 has a specific biological role Study authors Simon Elsässer and Laura Banaszynski both of whom worked on H3 3 in Allis s lab at Rockefeller but have since moved on to other institutions started by looking at the locations on the mouse genome where H3 3 was deposited in stem cells Elsässer began the project as graduate student in Allis s lab and continued as a postdoc at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in the United Kingdom He is now an assistant professor at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden He had the idea to look for H3 3 at repetitive sequences however repeats are normally filtered out in a genome wide study So Elsasser developed a new approach to capture this information A pattern emerged from the results H3 3 appeared at a certain type of repetitive sequence retrotransposons which are leftovers from ancient viral infections Unlike their ancestral viruses retrotransposons are trapped in the host genome but they can still copy themselves and jump to new locations within it Sometimes evolution finds a use for them For instance retrotransposon derived genes code for proteins necessary for the placenta in mammals But when retrotransposons jump they can also cause harmful mutations For studies like this one which explores chromatin s role regulating gene expression scientists often use mouse embryonic stem cells Stem cells chromatin landscape is more plastic than that of differentiated cells reflecting their capacity to enter any of many gene expression programs that lead to the hundreds of different cell types in an adult organism Once the cells have begun to pick an identity parts of the genome not needed for that identity get closed off forever Prior to the current study scientists knew mouse stem cellskept most of the genome accessible while keeping the lid on retrotransposons by tagging them with chemical markers containing three methyl groups on histone H3 Early experiments done by Banaszynski while a postdoc in Allis s lab suggested that H3 3 is necessary for the placement of these suppressive trimethyl marks By taking away proteins responsible for placing H3 3 into chromatin or eliminating H3 3 completely we confirmed that trimethylation depends on H3 3 says Banaszynski who is currently an assistant professor

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2015/05/04/odd-histone-helps-suppress-jumping-genes-in-stem-cells-study-says/ (2016-02-13)
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  • genome | Newswire
    the genome preventing potentially harmful mutations in mouse embryonic stem cells researchers have found This discovery reveals a basic mechanism for epigenetics or the control of inherited traits through means other than DNA More Tags C David Allis genome H3 3 histones jumping genes Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics Laura Banaszynski retrotransposons Simon Elsässer stem cells Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/genome/ (2016-02-13)
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  • New genetic technique probes the cause of skin cell differentiation in mammals | Newswire
    single layer of symmetrically dividing epidermal progenitor cells But at a certain point cells begin dividing asymmetrically or perpendicular to that layer In asymmetric division one daughter cell stays in the original layer self renews and maintains its progenitor potential the overlying daughter cell differentiates in a process of stratification that produces an effective barrier As more asymmetric divisions occur multiple layers of terminally differentiating cells are produced so that by the time the mouse is born its epidermis displays a self renewing protective skin barrier to keep harmful microbes out and bodily fluids in says Fuchs who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator These findings pointed the way to the latest research Drawing on previous experiments that identified genes involved in asymmetric cell division in the developing neurons of fruit flies the Fuchs team targeted a pathway involving the mouse versions of these genes LGN NuMA and Dctn1 They used a method of RNA interference which is based on the fact that short pieces of RNA called small hairpin RNAs can destroy RNA messages from specific genes thereby preventing the genes from producing proteins The researchers loaded a virus with short RNA bits that target the genes of interest and guided by ultrasound they injected the virus into the amniotic fluid surrounding the embryos in a pregnant mouse The virus infected the outermost layer of the embryos which shortly after gastrulation is the single layered skin This effectively silenced the genes they were targeting at precisely the right time and blocked asymmetric cell divisions The result was that the infected mice s skin failed to develop properly in large part because there were now too few differentiating layers to provide a good skin barrier Looking more closely the scientists also found that silencing the asymmetric cell division

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/03/02/new-genetic-technique-probes-the-cause-of-skin-cell-differentiation-in-mammals/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Geulah Livshits | Newswire
    work with But new research at Rockefeller University has applied the technique of RNA interference to probe the DNA of our fellow mammal the mouse In the process the researchers are uncovering a deeper understanding of cell differentiation in early development and hope to apply the results to cancer research More Tags Elaine Fuchs Geulah Livshits Scott Williams Slobodan Beronja stem cells Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/geulah-livshits/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Research shows when stem cell descendants lose their versatility | Newswire
    Professor and head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development However it is just as important for stem cells to know when to stop the process which is what we ve found here The researchers led by Ya Chieh Hsu a postdoctoral associate in Fuchs lab focused on mouse hair follicles which undergo cyclical bouts of growth destruction and rest a process requiring the activation of stem cells Stem cells are usually inactive at rest in their niche but when activated they proliferate and leave that niche to make new hairs In the new research published last week by Cell the researchers drilled down on this cycle defining the point at which activated stem cells become irreversibly committed to becoming the specialized cells needed to grow hair Through gene expression analysis and experiments designed to test the cells function at different stages in the cycle the researchers show that early stem cell descendents can retain their stemness and return back to their niche when hair growth stops In fact even after their proliferating descendants irreversibly lose their stemness some can still find their way back to the niche where they continue to serve two primary purposes they hold the hairs tightly in place to prevent hair loss and they release inhibitory signals that prevent the stem cells from activating too early This study shows that committed stem cell descendents transmit inhibitory signals back to the stem cells and return them to a dormant state says Fuchs who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Insititute investigator The finding gives us new insights into why our spurts of hair growth are followed by a resting period For many tissues of the body such negative feedback loops could provide the necessary signals to prevent tissue overgrowth These findings is work represents

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/01/18/research-shows-when-stem-cell-descendants-lose-their-versatility/ (2016-02-13)
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