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  • Gene identified that prevents stem cells from turning cancerous | Newswire
    Sept4 gene For several years Garcia Fernandez studied cells that lacked ARTS looking for signs of trouble relating to cell death In mature B and T cells she could not find any however so she began to look at cells earlier and earlier in development until finally she was comparing hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells Here she found crucial differences to be published Friday in Genes and Development Newborn ARTS deprived mice had about twice as many hematopoietic stem cells as their normal ARTS endowed peers and those stem cells were extraordinary in their ability to survive experimentally induced mutations The increase in the number of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in Sept4 deficient mice brings with it the possibility of accelerating the accumulation of mutations in stem cells says Garcia Fernandez They have more stem cells with enhanced resistance to apoptosis In the end that leads to more cells accumulating mutations that cannot be eliminated Indeed the ARTS deprived mice developed spontaneous tumors at about twice the rate of their controls We make a connection between apoptosis stem cells and cancer that has not been made in this way before this pathway is critically important in stem cell death and in reducing tumor risk says Steller who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator The work supports the idea that the stem cell is the seed of the tumor and that the transition from a normal stem cell to a cancer stem cell involves increased resistance to apoptosis ARTS interferes with molecules called inhibitor of apoptosis proteins IAPs which prevent cells from killing themselves By inhibiting these inhibitors under the right circumstances ARTS helps to take the brakes off the process of apoptosis permitting the cell to die on schedule Pharmaceutical companies are working to develop small molecule

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/10/14/gene-identified-that-prevents-stem-cells-from-turning-cancerous/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Maria Garcia-Fernandez | Newswire
    gene that prevents stem cells from turning into tumors in mice by regulating the process of programmed cell death or apoptosis The work is the first to show that interfering with the programmed death of stem cells can have fatal consequences More Tags ARTS Hermann Steller Maria Garcia Fernandez stem cells Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/maria-garcia-fernandez/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology | Newswire
    allow for highly efficient targeted killing of problematic cells such as those that drive the uncontrolled growth of tumors More Tags Cristinel Sandu Hermann Steller Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology October 14 2010 Science News Gene identified that prevents stem cells from turning cancerous Stem cells have tremendous regenerative power but their potency can also be lethal Now researchers have identified a gene that prevents stem cells from

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/strang-laboratory-of-apoptosis-and-cancer-biology/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Elaine Fuchs to receive 2010 L’Oréal-UNESCO prize for women scientists | Newswire
    and its associated human diseases have provided insights into our understanding of how stem cells of all types are able to rejuvenate tissues throughout life and also repair them after injury Fuchs received her B S in chemistry from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign in 1972 and her Ph D in biochemistry in 1977 from Princeton University She was a Damon Runyon postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1977 to 1980 Fuchs was the Amgen Professor of Basic Sciences at The University of Chicago before coming to Rockefeller in 2002 She was named the Rebecca C Lancefield Professor the same year She has been an HHMI investigator since 1988 Fuchs has received a number of honors and awards including the recently announced 2008 National Medal of Science the Bering Award and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Award for Scientific Excellence in 2006 the Dickson Prize in Medicine in 2004 the Novartis Drew Award in Biomedical Research in 2003 the Cartwright Award from Columbia University in 2002 and the Women in Cell Biology Senior Women s Career Achievement Award in 1997 In 1994 Fuchs was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences NAS and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences She was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2005 and the NAS in 1995 In 1985 the White House named Fuchs one of the Nation s Outstanding Scientists She also holds honorary doctorates from the University of Illinois and the Mount Sinai and New York University Schools of Medicine The L Oréal UNESCO award founded 12 years ago recognizes women scientists who have made important contributions to science and who have been a source of support motivation and inspiration for women in science The award is presented

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/10/14/elaine-fuchs-to-receive-2010-loreal-unesco-prize-for-women-scientists/ (2016-02-13)
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  • L’Oréal-UNESCO prize | Newswire
    throughout the world who are working in life and physical sciences More Tags dendritic cells Kayo Inaba L Oréal UNESCO prize Michel C Nussenzweig October 14 2009 Awards and Honors Elaine Fuchs to receive 2010 L Oréal UNESCO prize for women scientists Elaine Fuchs one of five women scientists around the world selected by the L Oréal UNESCO For Women in Science partnership to receive the 2010 L Oréal UNESCO

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/loreal-unesco-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Two proteins enable skin cells to regenerate | Newswire
    in the skin lose their capacity to self renew and replace skin cells that have died says Nguyen who is now an assistant Skin deep In a skin grafting experiment skin with TCF3 and TCF4 top unlike skin without the two proteins bottom can activate epidermal stem cells to replenish skin cells on the surface that have died and flaked off professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Texas We show that the epidermis cannot be maintained long term without these two proteins And that s what we see in the Petri dish as well as our skin grafting experiments The TCF proteins there is a family of four are found in many stem cells of the body Their ability to turn genes on depends on signals they receive from their molecular environment that result in the stabilization of a partner molecule called β catenin Fuchs who is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Rebecca C Lancefield Professor at Rockefeller and Nguyen have now learned that TCF3 and TCF4 can also work in skin stem cells by keeping off genes when nuclear β catenin is not around In the hair follicles TCF3 and TCF4 are required to maintain the stem cells as stem cells when β catenin is not around but when β catenin is there hair growth is activated says Fuchs In the skin epidermis TCF3 and TCF4 apparently maintain the epidermal stem cells all by themselves without β catenin If the TCF proteins always act through β catenin in the skin then you would always see the same failures whenever β catenin or TCF3 and TCF4 are missing says Nguyen But you don t The epidermis seems to rely more on TCF3 and TCF4 while hair follicles require TCF3 and TCF4 and β catenin This means

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/09/03/two-proteins-enable-skin-cells-to-regenerate/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Epigenetic mark guides stem cells toward their destiny | Newswire
    explains Fuchs who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and Rebecca C Lancefield Professor at Rockefeller Clues as to how epidermal stem cells restrict their fate began to emerge when Ezhkova profiled the molecular makeup of the basal layer of the epidermis and compared it to the differentiating layers As the skin stem cells began to differentiate a complex of proteins polycomb repressor complex that restrict access to genes decreased their expression while a transcription factor AP1 which activates genes increased its expression Of the five major proteins that make up the polycomb repressor complex Ezhkova focused on an enzyme called Ezh2 It has long been known that Ezh2 prevents cells from reading segments of chromosomes by adding a small modification that acts as a molecular clamp to the gene and physically blocks transcription factors from gaining access to them Past research had shown that Ezh2 blocked access to skin differentiation genes in embryonic stem cells but its role in skin stem cells had never been explored in a living animal Working with Alexander Tarakhovsky head of the Laboratory of Lymphocyte Signaling Fuchs s team bred mice with and without Ezh2 and found that mice without it were born with thicker skin than their normal counterparts Without Ezh2 to block access to the skin differentiation genes the skin stem cells began to differentiate much earlier As a result extra skin tissue builds up layer after layer Past research has shown that when embryonic stem cells lack Ezh2 genes for many cell differentiation pathways not just the skin lose their molecular clamps and become activated In skin stem cells however these genes also lose these molecular clamps but only the skin differentiation genes become activated To find out why only the skin pathway is switched on when the clamp

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/03/19/epigenetic-mark-guides-stem-cells-toward-their-destiny/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Rockefeller University president applauds new U.S. policy on stem cells | Newswire
    will also help many scientists make better use of limited research dollars by freeing them from the need to carefully separate privately funded experiments on non Registry cell lines from those that are publicly funded Under the old policy scientists wishing to work on certain lines of stem cells were not permitted to use supplies or equipment paid for by federal grant money Human embryonic stem cells which have the unique ability to become any type of cell in the body are of great interest to scientists who hope to someday be able to prod them to repair damaged or diseased organs Though the field holds great promise for treating a wide variety of conditions from diabetes to spinal cord injuries there is still much work to be done before treatments based on stem cells could be widely available Several labs at Rockefeller work with human embryonic stem cells including a line that was derived using funds exclusively from private sources under the old policy When you re dealing with research that may take years to fully mature it s important to have consistent policies in place that allow scientists to work without fear of political restrictions says Nurse In

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2009/03/09/rockefeller-university-president-applauds-new-u-s-policy-on-stem-cells/ (2016-02-13)
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