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  • ants | Newswire
    a model organism in order to ask questions about the relationships between genes social behavior and evolution One such question How does the interaction between a larvae s interaction with its caretaker sway the fate of the young animal More Tags ants C Biroi evolution genetics kronauer social evolution Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/ants/ (2016-02-13)
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  • C Biroi | Newswire
    as a model organism in order to ask questions about the relationships between genes social behavior and evolution One such question How does the interaction between a larvae s interaction with its caretaker sway the fate of the young animal More Tags ants C Biroi evolution genetics kronauer social evolution Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/c-biroi/ (2016-02-13)
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  • evolution | Newswire
    help unlock the secrets of larval fate Rockefeller researchers are developing a species of small raider ants as a model organism in order to ask questions about the relationships between genes social behavior and evolution One such question How does the interaction between a larvae s interaction with its caretaker sway the fate of the young animal More Tags ants C Biroi evolution genetics kronauer social evolution October 29 2008 Science News Simulator allows scientists to predict evolution s next best move In evolution even the slightest beginnings can lead to tools as complex as the human eye But how By modeling the steps evolution takes to build from scratch an adaptive biochemical network Rockefeller University scientists have provided a computational answer to one of Darwin s biggest questions More Tags Eric Siggia evolution April 22 2008 Campus News Rockefeller University hosts two day evolution symposium Beginning with the molecular origins of life and culminating with the latest findings on human evolution 18 of the world s leading experts will report on research spanning three billion years of evolution More Tags evolution James E Darnell Jr February 27 2008 Science News Understanding primate evolution could aid HIV research The discovery

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/evolution/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Biostatistics approach to genetics yields new clues to roots of autism | Newswire
    identify previously unknown genetic causes of other diseases even in cases where data has already been exhaustively analyzed The research led by Knut Wittkowski biostatistician in the Center for Clinical and Translational Science at The Rockefeller University Hospital is a twist on a traditional data mining technique known as a genome wide association study By comparing DNA from groups of people with a certain illness to those without it the technique identifies genetic variations that are associated with the disease Conventional analyses look for individual mutations called SNPs single nucleotide polymorphisms But looking for individual blips in the genetic code did not prove a reliable way to identify risk factors for early onset diseases like autism Wittkowski s method looks not just at individual SNPs but at combinations of several SNPs the equivalent of looking at whole words rather than just the single letters that form them Wittkowski applied this multivariate approach to data from studies of autism as well as studies of childhood absence epilepsy a condition that turns out to have a similar genetic profile First looking at a study of 185 cases of childhood epilepsy Wittkowski s team found that mutations in genes that control axonal guidance and calcium signaling both of which are important early in the developing brain when neurons are forming the appropriate connections led to increased chances of having the disorder This prompted the researchers to take a closer look at data from one of the largest studies of autism in the country containing genome sequences of some 2 700 individuals By using their more powerful statistical approach the researchers found clusters of mechanistically related genes where previous studies had merely suggested a few isolated SNPs Their work implicated the Ras pathway a calcium dependent signaling network that spurs neuronal growth as playing

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/01/31/biostatistics-approach-to-genetics-yields-new-clues-to-roots-of-autism/ (2016-02-13)
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  • autism | Newswire
    the disorder that had not been suggested in previous analyses The scientists offer evidence that beginning treatment in infants at the first symptoms could change the course of the disease possibly preventing the permanent pruning of neurons which occurs during the first two years of life from cementing autistic symptoms in place More Tags autism biostatisics genetics hospital Knut M Wittkowski The Rockefeller University Hospital Search for Categories Science News

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/autism/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Knut M. Wittkowski | Newswire
    News Statistical analysis could yield new drug target for MS For years multiple sclerosis researchers have had a database with the disease relevant genes of 13 000 individuals who either have the autoimmune affliction or are closely related to those who do But until now they had been unable to home in with precision on exactly what parts of the genes put those who have them at highest risk for the disorder A new statistical analysis by a biostatistician at Rockefeller University has identified a single amino acid as the most important risk factor for the disease that afflicts 2 5 million people worldwide More Tags Knut M Wittkowski multiple sclerosis August 28 2008 Science News U S and China tie for Olympic glory according to statistician By applying a statistical method originally developed to understand side effects associated with medical treatments scientists have computed an objective score for each country in the Beijing games The result China and the United States are dead even each ranking ahead of 85 other countries More Tags Knut M Wittkowski Olympics August 9 2007 Science News Biostatistics methodology yields an objective Tour de France ranking The problem with ranking cyclists is similar to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/knut-m-wittkowski/ (2016-02-13)
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  • The Rockefeller University Hospital | Newswire
    not been suggested in previous analyses The scientists offer evidence that beginning treatment in infants at the first symptoms could change the course of the disease possibly preventing the permanent pruning of neurons which occurs during the first two years of life from cementing autistic symptoms in place More Tags autism biostatisics genetics hospital Knut M Wittkowski The Rockefeller University Hospital December 5 2013 Science News Large scale survey of clinical research participants shows mostly positive experiences Although many participants gave high marks to the research teams trustworthiness and ability to explain their protocols the survey also revealed that a sizable minority did not feel completely prepared for the study The results suggest aspects of the participant experience that researchers may be able to address More Tags Barry S Coller The Rockefeller University Hospital March 18 2011 Science News University receives accreditation for its human research protection program Rockefeller University receives the gold seal for human subject protection programs which recognizes the institution s commitment to providing strong safeguards on behalf of human research participants More Tags Emil C Gotschlich Inc The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs The Rockefeller University Hospital April 14 2009 Campus News

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/the-rockefeller-university-hospital/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Research hints at why stress is more devastating for some | Newswire
    tight spaces and other conditions mice dislike with the goal of reproducing the sort of stressful experiences thought to be a primary cause of depression in humans Afterward in tests to see if the mice displayed the rodent equivalent of anxiety and depression symptoms they found about 40 percent showed high levels of behaviors that included a preference for a dark compartment over a brightly lit one or a loss of interest in sugar water The remaining 60 percent recovered well from the stress This distinction between the susceptible mice and the resilient ones was so fundamental that it emerged even before the mice were subjected to stress some unstressed mice showed an anxiety like preference for a dark compartment over a lighted one The researchers found that the highly stress susceptible mice had less of an important molecule known as mGlu2 in a stress involved region of the brain known as the hippocampus The mGlu2 decrease they determined resulted from an epigenetic change which affects the expression of genes in this case the gene that codes for mGlu2 If you think of the genetic code as words in a book the book must be opened in order for you to read it These epigenetic changes which affect histone proteins associated with DNA effectively close the book so the code for mGlu2 cannot be read says first author Carla Nasca a postdoc in the lab and a fellow of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Previously she and colleagues implicated mGlu2 in depression when they showed that a promising potential treatment known as acetyl carnitine rapidly alleviated depression like symptoms in rats and mice by reversing these epigenetic changes to mGlu2 and causing its levels to increase Currently depression is diagnosed only by its symptoms Nasca says But these results

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/09/02/discovery-hints-at-why-stress-is-more-devastating-for-some/ (2016-02-13)
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