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  • Colorectal cancer | Newswire
    Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology metastasis microRNA Sohail Tavazoie November 11 2009 Science News High fat diet increases inflammation in the mouse colon In mice fed a diet high in fat and low in fiber vitamin D and calcium the so called Western diet expression of a series of genes collectively associated with immune and inflammatory responses was altered The findings show that a Western diet induces oxidative stress and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/colorectal-cancer/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Discovery of pro-metastasis protein reveals mysterious link to neurodegeneration | Newswire
    and co author Saeed Tavazoie a professor at Columbia University to scan both the sequence and shape of RNA molecules in breast cancer cells Only recently have cancer researchers begun to systematically look at the shapes of messenger RNA molecules which encode instructions from DNA It turns out that RNA shape matters because certain shapes offer binding sites for proteins that once bound determine the fate of the RNA molecule These fates can include targeting the RNA molecules for destruction an act that reduces expression of a gene Based on patterns they found in breast cancer cells prone to metastasis including an unusual abundance of hairpin like loops within the RNAs targeted for destruction the researchers homed in on the hairpin loop binding protein TARBP2 In the cancer cells the researchers concluded TARBP2 appears to act as a sort of master regulator by binding to multiple sites on RNA molecules and causing a suite of changes that lead to metastasis including the destruction of RNAs By destroying these RNAs this protein can interfere with the expression of genes and that appears to be TARBP2 s effect on some metastasis suppressing genes Indeed they found TARBP2 is overexpressed in cells prone to metastasizing as well as in metastatic human breast tumors themselves When the researchers looked to see what genes might be turned down in these same cells they found two surprises APP responsible for a protein linked to Alzheimer s disease and ZNF395 which is associated with Huntington s disease In follow up experiments the researchers discovered ZNF395 appears to decrease the expression of genes linked to cancer while a protein segment of APP directly inhibits breast cancer s ability to metastasize It turns out TARBP2 tunes down the expression of both of these metastasis suppressor genes cells prone to

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/07/28/discovery-of-pro-metastasis-protein-reveals-mysterious-link-to-neurodegeneration/ (2016-02-13)
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  • TARBP2 | Newswire
    linked with neurodegeneration More Tags cancer metastasis neurodegeneration RNA Sohail Tavazoie TARBP2 July 9 2014 In the News In the News Daily Mail UK Tavazoie How spread of breast cancer could be stopped Professor Sohail Tavazoie who led the research said If we learn more about how this regulation works we may in the future be able to generate drugs that prevent this protein from More Tags cancer Sohail Tavazoie

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/tarbp2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • In the News – Daily Mail UK – Tavazoie | Newswire
    Tavazoie who led the research said If we learn more about how this regulation works we may in the future be able to generate drugs that prevent this protein from triggering metastatic disease Tags cancer Sohail Tavazoie TARBP2 newswire rockefeller edu In the News In the News Ars Technica 7 11 14 Comments are closed Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/07/09/in-the-news-daily-mail-uk-tavazoie/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Drug is identified that could block the spread of melanoma | Newswire
    That newly identified molecular target is a protein called the liver X beta receptor Although it is named for the organ in which it was first discovered liver X beta is found in the nucleus of cells throughout the body It belongs to a class of receptors that respond to chemical signals called hormones Treatments for some reproductive cancers such as those of the breast and prostate have homed in on similar nuclear hormone receptors but liver X beta is the first such receptor researchers have targeted in the fight against skin cancer Like other nuclear hormone receptors liver X receptors can control the expression of genes In this case the relevant gene codes for a protein known as ApoE which Tavazoie s group had previously discovered to have a potent ability to both suppress cancer cells ability to invade new tissue and the tumors ability to recruit blood vessels cellular processes necessary for metastasis This protein has already received scrutiny from scientists including Rockefeller s Jan Breslow who studied its role in cardiovascular disease and compounds have been developed targeting the liver X pathway to lower cholesterol although they never made it to human efficacy testing In research recently described Cell the researchers treated mice bearing human and mouse melanoma cells with one such drug called GW3965 which is known to increase levels of ApoE They found this drug greatly reduced the progression of metastasis in the lungs and brain but also suppressed the growth of tumors The findings could have a significant impact on survival because the metastatic spread of cancer is the primary determinant of mortality in patients If further testing bears it out this discovery may help fill a deadly gap in the arsenal against melanoma Current therapies either target defects caused by a genetic mutation

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/04/02/drug-is-identified-that-could-block-the-spread-of-melanoma/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Researchers discover unusual genetic mutation linked to adolescent liver cancer | Newswire
    in the bodies of individuals with the gene We discovered chimeric RNAs in the tumor samples made when DNA deletions create unnatural products that can drive cancer says Nicolas Robine co first author and NYGC Computational Biologist This chimera had never been seen before so we believe it will help drive the work of our Rockefeller colleagues and Elana s future It is the NYGC s mission to undertake such collaborative genomic studies that will accelerate medical advances Because of the deletion and then rejoining of the DNA a new gene that was a mixture of two previous genes was created called a chimera says Elana Simon A number of other types of tumors have been shown to be driven by chimeras but this one is unique it codes for a kinase an enzyme that modifies other proteins that has not been identified in cancers Furthermore the researchers found that the kinase was made only in the tumor cells and that it was constantly active They believe that overproduction of this kinase may explain the uncontrolled growth of the tumor These results were extremely encouraging says Sanford Simon the study s senior author and head of Rockefeller s Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics It is uncommon for a genetic screen for a cancer to turn up such a strong candidate mutation and for the mutation to be present in every single patient tested Elana Simon in the Rockefeller University lab where she conducted research on fibrolamellar cancer the same type she was diagnosed with six years ago For Elana Simon who is finishing her senior year in high school and did the work after school and during breaks the results are not only a scientific success but also a profoundly personal one her interest in studying the disease developed after she herself was diagnosed with fibrolamellar six years ago The study was conducted in collaboration with the surgeon who removed her tumor in 2008 Michael P LaQuaglia chief of the Pediatric Surgical Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and her father Sanford Simon as well as the NYGC team The research is also unusual in that it was funded not by a federal grant but largely with private gifts from the Fibrolamellar Cancer Foundation and several individual donors whose lives have been touched by the disease Additional support was also provided by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute the New York Genome Center The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science and by a gift to The Rockefeller University by an anonymous donor The Simon lab is now working on testing the effects of the chimera on human liver cells and in mouse livers to further elucidate its role in the disease If they can understand what s causing the tumors to develop the scientists can work on not only treating them using a genetic target to halt the cancer s growth but also catching them before they even appear The hope is that we d be able to screen

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2014/02/28/researchers-discover-unusual-genetic-mutation-linked-to-adolescent-liver-cancer/ (2016-02-13)
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  • chimera | Newswire
    researchers at The Rockefeller University Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the New York Genome Center an unusual mutation has been found that is strongly linked to one such disease a rare liver cancer that affects teens and young adults More Tags cancer chimera elana simon fibrolamellar liver Memorial Sloan Kettering New York Genome Center Sandy Simon Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/chimera/ (2016-02-13)
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  • elana simon | Newswire
    of researchers at The Rockefeller University Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the New York Genome Center an unusual mutation has been found that is strongly linked to one such disease a rare liver cancer that affects teens and young adults More Tags cancer chimera elana simon fibrolamellar liver Memorial Sloan Kettering New York Genome Center Sandy Simon Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/elana-simon/ (2016-02-13)
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